Skip to main content

Full text of "Manufacturing and mercantile resources and industries of the principal places in Wayne, Henry, Delaware and Randolph counties, Indiana : with a review of their manufacturing, mercantile and general business interests, advantageous location, &c, including a brief historical and statistical sketch of their rise and progress"

See other formats


Gc 

977.2 
M31 

1414538 



M. L 



GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



&EU 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



III 



3 1833 02408 6990 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center 



http://www.archive.org/details/manufacturingmerOOinslsn 



Part V, Resources and Industries of Indiana. 



Manufacturing and Mercantile"' 



Resour ces I Industries 

OF THE PRINCIPAL PLACES IN 

Wayne, Henry, Delaware § Randolph 

COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

REVIEW OF THEIR MANUFACTURING, MERCAN- 
TILE % GENERAL BUSINESS INTERESTS. 
ADVANTAGEOUS LOCATION, &c. 



INCLUDING A BBIEF HISTORICAL AND STATISTICAL SKETCH OF THEIR 



RISE AND PROGRESS 



* 



1884. 



.4 



1414538 



' 



PREFACE. 



In placing this work before the public we desire to express our purpose fully and clearly, 
viz: to publish such portions of the section's history as will be most useful in tracing its growth 
and development, and to so identify the manufacturers and merchants here located with its pres- 
ent condition, that the outside world may form a proper estimate of its importance as a point of 
manufacture and distribution. In detailing so fully the extent and operation of each establish- 
ment here noted, our design is that they may serve as illustrations of all that is claimed for this 
part of the State. That the industries operated here to-day, whether large or small, attest fully 
the advantages held out by this favored section, none can gainsay, and that many of the most 
prominent ones owe a fair measure of their success lo the excellent facilities afforded them of 
all kinds, is beyond question. 

Located as this portion of the state of Indiana is, about midway between the densely- 
populated sections of the country, with prompt and rapid railway communication in all direc- 
tions, it presents attractions for the investment of capital which equal, if they do not surpass, 
those of any other community in the Union. 

We do not believe that one single manufactory in our whole selection has been over-esti- 
mated, nor have we relied upon hercsay or taken a cursory glance over the field; our work has 
been carefully done and much lime and labor expended by our staff in securing details from 
those in charge of all establishments noted, and should any branch of industry appear to receive 
less prominence than deserved it must be remembered that our enterprise was from its very 
nature co-operative, requiring^is it did public approval and support; and the fault cannot be 
justly placed to our account. ^Ve are none the less convinced however, that taken as a whole, 
no single work on this place, ever issued, has contained so much new and valuable information, 
or so entirely supplied an existing want. 

Many things combine to make this an attractive location, but as they will become apparent 
from a glance over these pages, we omit mention of them here. We have been aided in our 
undertaking by the many who kindly gave the information asked, and to whom we extend 
pur thanks. 

THE PUBLISHERS. 



* 
* 

y 



INDEX. 



RICHMOND. 

Albright, J. C &Co, . 

Alexander, W. W., . 

Aider, E. F 

Arlington House, . . 

Arnold, B, . . . . 

Ballard, M. B, . . . 

Barber, J. O., . . . 

Bnrgis, M. E., . . . 

Barnes, G. W 

Bartel, Adam H. & Co., 

Beckwith, J. B, . . . 

Bellis, S., 

Bellinger, Charles, . . 

Benners, Win. J. Ac Son 

Benson Brothers, . . 

Betzold, Mrs. Joseph, . 

Bradbury, Win. & Son, 

Brooks, J. G, . . . 

Brown. Van D., . . 

Bryson House, . . . 

Boppart, Dr. A., . . 

Bowers, D, . . . . 

Buckley, S. M., . . . 

Cain, William, . . . 

CasU-r, C. 

Chambers, C. H., . . 

Champion Roller Skate 
and Wagon Company, 

Chase Piano Company, . 

Coftman, A. J., . . . . 

Cole, Mrs. A. P., . . . 

Crawford, D. B. & Son, . 

Crocker, M. L., . . . . 

Crocker, O. P., . . . . 

Crocker, Peter, . . . . 

Cuamer, Thomas Sc Co., 

Cunningham, J. A. & Son, 

Crume, Dunn & Co., . . 

Cutter, Henrv, . . . . 

Dalley, E. F, . . . . 

Dale "& Homada, . . . 

De Witt, Stokes & Co., . 

Deal, B. B. & Co , . . . 

Dennis, William T., . . 

Dennison, E. P., . . . 

Detch, G. 6i Son, . . . 

Dewker, H. W., . . . 

Dick, William, . . . . 

Dickinson, C. A., . . . 

Dickman, J. H., . . . . 

Dille and McGuire Manu- 
facturing Company, . 

Downing, H. R. & Son, . 

Drake, F. A., . . . . 

Eckel & Co., 

Eggemeyer, George H., . 

Eldorado Laundry and 
Bath Rooms, . . . . 



Eggemeyer, John M., . 
Engelbert, Henry H., . 
Estell Brothers, . . . 
Ezra Smith Manufactu 

ing Association, . . 
Farnham, Charles S., 
Fetta, Harman, . . . 
Flue Thimble Compai 
Flanagan, Patrick, . . 
Foulke, \\ . W. & Co, 

Fox, S, 

Fry Brothers, . . . 
Fulton Boiler and Sheet 

Iron Works, . . . 
Gaar, Scott <x Co., . . 
Getzendanner & Bracke 
Gilbert, J. B, . . . 

Grand Hotel 

Griffin, James F, . . 
Grothaus, F., . . . . 
Hatfield, J. H, . . . 
Havnes, Spencer & Co, 
Hiatt, W. F., .... 
Henlev, John, . . . 

Hill, B. C 

Hollopeter, J. C, . . 
Hofiman, A. J, . . . 
Hoosier Drill Compan 
Hutton, J. M. £ Co, 
Huntington House, . 
Husson, Peter, . . . 
llitT Brothers, . . . 
Johnson & Woodhurst, 
Jordan, J. J., . . . . 
Jones, C. A, . ... 
Kentworthy & Co., . 
Keys, C. A, .... 
Klein, Sol, .... 
Klein, Samuel, . . . 
Knabe's Bazaar, . . . 

Knabe, J. A 

Knollenberg, George II. 
Kreimer, C, .... 
Kreimer, B, . . . . 
Lammert, C, .... 

Larsh, H. C 

Lammert, W. Jr., . . 
Lemon & Clark, . . 
Leonard, L. & Co, . 
Lichtenfels, Peter & Co 
Little, Newton D, . 
Lippincott, S. R, . .. 
LouerA: Co, .... 
Luring, Henrv, . . . 
Luken, A. G.'.S: Co, . 
Lyon & Co, .... 
Mather Brothers, . . 

Marlatt, S. 

Matthews, E.R, . . 



57 
57 
60 

43 
47 
13 
60 

55 

& 

16 

15 

17 
iS 

45 
33 
36 
60 
60 
20 

57 
60 

-4 
53 

60 

ss 

3 J 

33 
47 
4" 

g 

60 
60 
60 
56 
55 
59 
54 
-5 
60 
60 
60 

i! 

60 

60 

t\ 

60 i 

45 

£ 

4s 

CO 

60 

60 
60 

60 I 



Maag, B 

Macke, J. & Son, . . 
Marcus, J, . . . . 
Mashmeyer, G. W. & Co. 
Marchant & Haynes, . 
Mever, A. W, . . . 
Meerhoff, H. H, . . 

Menke, E. H 

Minck's Brewery, . . 
Middleton, W. H. & Co. 
Miller, H. M, . . . 
Moore, J. W. & Co, . 
Moorman, J. H, . . . 
Morris & Hunt, . . . 
Morrow, E. & Sons, . 
Morgan, T. F. & Son, 
McCarthy, John F, . 
McCulloiigh, George C. 
Newman, C. E., . . 
Nicholson & Bro, . . 
Nixon, Thomas . . . 
Nordyke & Hadlev, . 
Nutting, S. F, . * . . 
Nye's China Palace, . 
O'Harra.John, . . . 
Patterson, E. & Co, . 
Pardieck, B. & Sons, . 

Peltz, J. C. 

Peterson, John, . . . 

Pierson, S. M 

Pickens, Thomas, . . 
Pickett, A.J, . . . 
Potts, J & Son, . . . 
Pogue & Miller, . . 
Poundstone, J, . . . 
Price, C. T, Jr., . . 
Provident Life Associat'n 
Quaker Citv Chair Co, 
Quaker Citv Mills, . 
Quaker City Ice Co, . 
Rav & Harvey, . . . 

Reuler.J, 

Reynolds, E. L, . . 
Reed, Irvin & Sons, . 
Richmond Woolen Mills, 
Richmond Roller Skate 

Company, .... 
Richmond" Truck Mann 

facturing Company, 
Richmond Business Col 

lege and Teh-graph In 

stitute, 

Richmond Chair Co, 
Richmond Roller Mills 
Richmond Church Fund 

ture Company, . . 
Richmond Machine W'ks 
Richmond Planing and 

Flooring Mills, . . . 



INDEX. 



Richmond City Mill W'ks 
Richmond National Bank 
Roberts, H. M. & Son, . 
Robinson Machine W'ks, 

Rosa, E. F. 

Ross, W. H., .... 
Roling, John H., . . 
Rogers, S., . . . . 
Runge, Henry II ., . . 
Runge, Louis & Son, 
Russell, G W. cV Co., 
Starr's Cluthing Store, 
Starr, W. C. & Son, . 
Schaefer, Chris. F. & Co 
Schipman, G. \V., . . 
Schmitt, S., . - . • 

Scott, T. B 

Schneider, Philip, . . 
Schooley, W. D., . . 
Sedgwick Brothers, . 
Second National Bank, 
Shofer, Herman, . . 
Shafer & Stranahan, . 
Sinex Plow Company, 
Smith & Dunham, . 

Smith, W.J. 

Snyder, G. II., . . . 
Spinning, Frank W., . 

Stone, C- W 

Slratton S; Gordon, . 
Sudhoff, William H., . 
Swan, William R. & Co 
Tavlor, J. S., Jr., . . 
Temp'.eton, L. J. & Co 
Thompson, W. O., . . 
Thompson, D , . . . 
Thompson & Good, . 
Trindle, William H., . 
Tuch Brothers, . . . 
Vansant, Mrs., . . . 
Vansunfc Samuel, , . 
Vansant, R. R., . . 
Van Uxem, F.& Co., . 
Varlev, James J., . . 
Valley Oil Mills, . . 
Ward, E. J., . . . . 
Wampler. ].,.... 
Warder & Stace, . . 
Wayne Agricultural Co 
Wavne Creamerv Co., 
Werner, J., . *. . . 
White Water Tannery, 

Wilkc, H 

Yohle, C 

Young, P., . . . . 
Zeller & Co., .... 
Zeyen, J. & Bro , . . 

CAMBRIDGE CITY 
Bailey, C. M 



Bailey, J. T, . . 
Bever, August, . 
Bradbury. A. W., 
Callawa'v, M. M., 
Donev, W. & Son, 
Drischel, D., . . 
Dreschel, B. F., . 
Dale.W., . . . 



Ebert, Emil, . . 
Elliott. C B., . . 
First National Bank 
Frohnapfel, T., . 
Fin frock, J. H., . 
Griesinger, J., . 
Hastings, E R. & Son 
Harper, S., . . 
Hollowell, A. C, 
Herrington, S. P., 
Hoshour, S. H., . 
Hatch, Frank, . 
Hotel Kirby, . . 
Ingennan, H., . 
Jenks, A., . . . 
Kepler, John, . . 
Kimmel.J. & D., 
Kimmel Bros., . 
Lackev, C, . . 
Marso'n, J. W., . 
Marson, John, . 
Markle, C, . . 
Myers, L., . . . 
Mosbaugh, F. C, 
Mason i Holderm 
Mvers Bros , . . 
McCarthy, J. J , . 
McCaffrey & Son, 
Pirn, J. & Son, . 
Routh, J. B., . . 
Routh, C. W., . 
Rudy, E. C, . . 
Rumme', F. & Co.. 
Roth & Co., . . ! 
Stahrs Hotel, . - 
Straub, C, . . . 
Shussler, Henry, 
Schafer, Casper, . 
Swiggett, L. & Son 
Shults Roth & Co. 
Trembly, S. A., 
Vinton House, 
Wright, C. T, . 
Weekly, I., . . 
Wheeler, F. L., . 
Western Wayne Bank 

CENTREVIW 

American House, 
Beitzel, M., . . 
Bersh, Mary E., . 
Commons, J., 
Doughty, S. C, 
Dunba-, J A. ic Co 
Edmunds Chair Co. 
First National Bank 
Greene, M. E., . 
Harvey & Squires, 
Johnston, M. T., 
Keys, J. W. & Co. ; 
Leeson, H. C, . 
Mathews, William 
Park Hotel, . . 
Richet & Reed, . 
Rising Sun Mills, 
Shoff, R. S., . . 
Ward, R. Si Son, 
Williams, L. F., . 



HAGERSTOWN. 



Allen & Co., . . 






87 


Backinsioce, C, . . 




89 


Baldwin, Mrs. Lida, 




88 


Beck & Stonebrnker, 




89 


Bowman, E., . . . 




8s 


Chamness, M. E., 






. 88 


Cheesman, I)., . 






87 


Commercial Bank, 






7-' 


Dilling & Co., . 






»S 


Dolley, W. M., . 






89 


Foid, Charles, . 






89 


Funk & Jeinison, 






S 7 


Gebhart, W., . . 






So 


Jenks, F. K., . . 






S9 


Lontz, S., . . . 






89 


Mathews, H. & Son 






85 


Newcomb, F. F., 






S9 


Newcom House, 






8s 


Pierce & Potter, 






89 


Pitman, W. H., . 






87 


Porter & Hughes, 






89 


Potter, William, 






88 


Reedy & Knode, 






89 


Rogers, W., . . 






«9 


Shively & Sons, 






86 


Slifer, D. P., . . 






89 


Starr & Petty, . 






89 


Stonebraker, John, 






89 


Teetor, Daniel W., 






86 


Teetor & Morrison, 




89 


Teetor Machine Work 


s, 


S8 


Walker, A. C, . . 




86 


Wallick. J., . . . 




8p 


Werking & Co., . . 




72 


Williams, T. N., . 




So 


Wimmer's Marble Works, 86 


Wood, W. L. 88 


OVUJLIX. 


Barrett, C. J., . . . . 92 


Burney, John, .... 91 


Crull, S. F., 


92 
92 


Dillon, S. & Son, . . . 


Etlis, IraF., 90 


Fountain, John 90 


Hagaman & McTaggart, 92 


Hicks, W. J., 


91 
91 


Holland & Brown, . . . 


King, E. N., 92 




Pike, Jesse, 90 


Rockafellow.J. V.R., . . 92 


Rowe, J. C, 


92 
91 


Scott, John W., .... 


Smith & Frazee, ... 92 


Swain, C C, .... 92 


Swain, J. G., 92 

White & Maxwell, . . . 91 


BIII^TOJi. 


Bragg it Guv ton, ... 94 


Brown, J. A Son, . . 


• 94 


Callaway, G. W. & Co 


, • 94 


Dorsey Machine Co., . 


• 93 


Grigsby, J. M 


• 95 


Hollowell, C. C, . . 


• 95 


Hoshour, P., . . . 






95 



MDEX. 



Jones, F. M. & Co., 
Jones Sc Gresh, . . 
Leggate, Geoige, , 
Manlove, J. L , . 
Michael, M., . . 
Moore, M. H. Sc Co 
Moore, W. P., . 

-Noll, J 

St. Clair & Bilb\ 
Swope, VV H., ' 
Warren, Peter, 



E. GERMAXTOWX. 



Neff, E. D., . 
Sourbier, H. M. 
Shoff; J. S., . 
Warfel, E., . 
Winter, J. H., 

I.EWISVH.I.E. 

Bartlett, Mrs. Robert, 
Brown Sc Bollmeyer 
Caldwell House, . 
Coltrain ^ Philip 
Fenstamaker, D., 
Guering, T. L., . 
Hool, Benjamin, 
Houston, W. L., 
Hume, G., . . . 
Keller, J. C, . . 
Lewis, W. H., . 
Reyi.olds, William, 
Sanders Sc Chesnut, 
Smith & Son, . . 
Wilson & Hopper, . 

NEW CASTI.E. 

Arcade Billiard Hall, 
Arnold, Samuel, . 
Baldwin, Roberts & Co 
Barr, R. H, . . . 
Bouslog & Ice, . 
Bundy Nou-e, . 
Campbell Bios., . 
Carson, R. B., . 
Citizens' State Ban 
Coffin, H.T., . . 
Colburn, C. C, . 
Cummins, J., . . 
Davis Bros., . . 
Davis, Clinc, . . 
Davis, Mark., . . 
Fairfield Ac Moore. 
First National Bank 
Goodwin, R. [). £ Co 
Gough A: Hernly, 
Gough, J. M., . 
Groves, Wm. A. & So 
Hall & Son, . . 
Harvev A: Davis Bi 
Heirich, M. A- . 
Hillock, W. G., . 
Houck Bros., . . 
Huddleston & Son 
Jennings, S. P., . 
Jordan, T. C, . 
Junction Tavern, 
Kahn.E., . . . 



107 
107 
tog 

1 1 1 
104 
in 
102 
109 
106 
no 
102 
III 
10S 
in 
103 
1 1 1 
1 1 1 
106 
10S 
107 
in 
1 1 1 
10S 
105 
in 
in 



103 

111 



Keiser.J. U., . . . . 
Kinsey Sc Giiffith. . . 
Livezey, John C. & Co., 
Livezev, Natlian, . . 
Mc Bride, J. C, . . . 
Mahin.G. E. & Co., . 
Modlin, W. W, . . . 
Moore, Ernest, . . . 
Mowrer, Jim., . . . 
Mowrer, John M., . . 
Murphey, C. P., . . . 
Murphey, G. R. & W. H 
N'ewCastle Carriage W'k 
New Castle Flour Mills 
New Castle Foundry and 

Pump Company . . . 101 
New Castle Furniture Co. 104 
Needham, C. E., . . . 105 
Needham, L. W.& L. D n in 
Needham, Wint., . . . 107 
Nixon & Son, . . . . m 

Pence, W. M. 106 

Philips, T. W-, . . . .in 
Pitman, I. W. Sc Son., .111 
Rodgers, L., 102 



105 



. 109 



11S 
"7 



Root, G. H 

Schrock Sc Bundy, . . . 
Shriner, John O., . . . 
Shirk, Johnson Sc Fisher, 
Smith, Robert B., . . . 
Smith Sc Shirk, .... 
Vaughan, T. R. & Bro., . 
Waldron & Maxin, . . 
Way man, A. R., 
Wayman,John, . 

KJilGHTSTOWX. 

Addison & White, 
Baer Sc Swaim, . 
Ball, E. S. & Co., 

Bell Sc Co. 11S 

Breckenridge & Co., . . 11S 
Condit, H. H., . . . . n6 
Culbertson, L. M., . . .116 

Dovey, I. C., 115 

Edwards, W. M., . . .118 
Forbes & Applegate, . .114 
Furgason, J. T., .... 118 

Harden, W. H. uS 

Harris, Burt u8 

Haufler & McMurney, . 11S 
Heaton, John, . . . .in; 
Heaton, White, . . . .116 
Heritage, D. L, . . . . 1 iS 

Hiatt Bros., 117 

llittle, Sol., 116 

Hoover, T., 114 

Hubbard, C S., . . . . uS 
Lemmon, C. I., . . . . 11S 
Lowrv, J. W., . . . . 11S 
Lowery, G. S.&J.W., .117 

Mills, James, 113 

Morris, A. O., . . . .114 

Niles, E. B 118 

Overman, R. E., . . . 115 
Pickering & Patterson, . 1 iS 

Pike, J. A., 117 

Power, J. M., 118 I 



Shipman Hotel, . . . 

Thayer, D. W., . . . 

Valley House, . . . 

Wade, N. B, . . . . 
Walling Sc Burke Bros., 

Walling Sc Son, . . . 

Watts, Harrv, . . . 

Watts & Parker, . . 

Watts, Peter 

Weaver, John, . . . 

Weaver, W. S, . . . 

White, Allen S, . . . 

Wilkinson & Peden, . . 

Williams Sc Carroll, . . 

Williams & Hatfield, . . 

MIDDEETOWN. 

Brunk Sc Brattain, . 
Cummins, W. H., . 
Hollowell & Mowrey 
Honey Creek Mills, 
Middletown Mills, . 
Tykle, Fred., . . . 



. 11S 
. 118 
. 116 
. 11S 
. 118 
• "3 



• "3 
. 118 

• "5 
. 118 
. 112 

• "4 

• "3 
. uS 



UQ 

I20 

lig 
120 

120 
120 



MUJJCIE. 

Allen, B. B , . . . . 
Andrews, G. H., . . 
Bandv, P. H., . . . 
Banta, J. E. & Co., . . 
Bower, G. W., . . . 
Boyce & Bufkin, . . 
Boyce, James St Co., . 
Bradbury, R., . . . 
Bratton & Shideler, . 
Brown, F. M., . . . 
Cassadv, J. V., . . . 
Chambers, C. S., . . 
Charman, James, . . 
Coffeen Marble Works, 
Coleman, A. R., . . 
Cornelius Jc Coleman, 
Cox & Seaton, . . . 
Desser Sc Dean, . . . 
Dungan. E , . . . . 
Eisenbrand, L. R., . . 
Elliott, George L., . . 

Ervin, J.R. 

Franklin, C. P., . . . 

Gass, C., 

Gilbert, Web., . . . 
Goddard, Joseph A., . 
Green, C. H., . . . 
Greer & Wilk-'nson, . 
Haines & Mason, . . 
Harper, L. H., . . . 

Hart, S. 

Heath, F. W. & Co., . 

Hill, J. A 

Hoover, C. S 

Hopkins, P. C. & Co., 
Howe & Little, . . . 
Howell, W. P., . . . 
HurTer, D. S., . . . 
Hummel .S: Son . . 
Treland, A. C, . . . 
Johnson, A. L. & Co., 
Kimbrough, C. M., . 
Kirby House, . . . 



12S 
»44 
'44 
J 44 
J 44 
J 44 
> 2 4 
*44 

144 

1+4 
M4 
134 
135 

3 

12S 

'44 

3 

129 

\u 

*33 
131 
144 
135 
•3s 



144 

140 

'44 
144 
l -H 
'44 
136 
M4 
132 
*44 
133 



Klopfer & Bro., . . . 


• '39 


Klopfer, Fred 


140 


Kuechman, M., . . . 


136 


Little, J. W 


144 


Long iV Colling, . . 


144 


Long, J. M., .... 


144 


Long, NT. H., . . . . 


141 


Lyman, A. E., . . . 


'44 


Lynn, \V. & Son, . . 


»44 


Maddy House, . . . 


*4 2 


Mason, J. R, .... 


'41 


Maxwell, G. P., . . . 


'44 


Meeks, R. & I. & Co., 


129 


Miller, J. K., . . . . 


141 


Milligan, A. A., . . . 


1^2 


Mock Bros., .... 


'V 


Mock, M. G, . . . 


140 


Mong, R. H, . . . 


n8 


Muncie Mills, . . . 


M9 


Muncie Steam Laundry 




Neely, Thad. A., . . 


H4 


Nicholls, H C, . . . 




Nickey, J. F., . . . 


H7 


Opera House Grocery, 


i.V 


Perkins, J. W., . . . 


144 


Putnam & Kirby, . . 


'44 


Robbins, H. L., . . . 


'44 


Rosenbush, M., . . . 


r 4 > 


Richey, W. Ed., .' . 


ils 


Rilev.A.J., 




Ritter, J. K., . . . . 


17,2 


Schick, L. & C. A., . 


I44 


Sheperd, J. A., . . . 


'44 


Shirk, W. W, . . . 


'44 


Silverburg, H., . . . 


HP 


Snell, Eph., .... 




Smith, W. R., . . . 


139 


Snell, T. B 


'44 


Snyder, Henrv & Son, 


HI 


Streeter, J. L. & Co., . 


126 


Stuckv, C 


141 


Thomas, Milt., . . . 




Thompson, R., . . . 


127 


Topp & Willson, . . 


144 


Tremont House, . . 


'44 


Truitt, J., 


127 


Vogt, Jacob, .... 


'37 


Wachteli, J. & Co., . 


'44 


Wachtell & March, . 


'44 


Wachteli & Tvner, . 


142 


Weaver & Vaughn, . 


141 


Weller, L. L., . . . 




Wilcoxon, L., . . . 


'4- 


Wildermuth, Charles, 


127 


Williams, Duncan, . . 


ns 


Wright Sc Garrard, . 


130 


Wysor, Haines & Co., 


'44 


Zuber, George, . . . 


H \ 


WINCHESTER. 


< 


Alexander, M. C. & Son 


160 


Ballinger & Winter, . 


161 


Botkin, T. W., . . . . 


163 


Bowser, G. H., . . . . 


163 


Brinkley, A 


162 


Bundy, B. F., . . . . 


iss 


Camneld, A. G., . . . 


'S5 


Carver, A. C, . . . . 


160 



INDEX 

Chapman & Ginn, 
City Hotel, . . 
City Restaurant, 
Clcvenger, Slepher 
Coates, S. D. & So 
Connor, Je>se, . 
Cranor. J. ,£ Co., 
Davis Bros., . . 
Dean, P. H., . . 
Diggs, John W., 
Diggs ii Way, . 
Farmers' and Merc 

Bank, . . . 
Franklin House, 
Gaffev, M. C, . 
Ginger, J. W , . 
Gordan, T. S., . 
Harter, James, . 
Helmes & Bishop, 
Hiatt, A. R., . . 
Hiatt, E. R., . . 
Hinshaw, J. A. & Son 
Hirsch, Adam, . 
Hirsh, J.C., . . 
Hoffman, D. E., 
Hobbick& McConnell 
Irvin House, . . 
Keener, Charles F 
Keller A: Meier, . 
Kemp & Jackson, 
Kizer & Co., . . 
Klamberg, Louis, 
Knecht & Thomas 
Knight A: Hueston 
Litschcrt, R. J., . 
Magee, C E., . 
Manderbach & Geltle 
Meyer, Conrad, . 
Miller & Fudge, 
Miller, Mortimer, 
Monks, C. C, . 
Moore, C. W., . 
Poyner, I. L., . 
Randolph County Bank 
Reed, W. W., . 
Rice, Alfred, . . 
Richardson, John 
Rogers, W. H. & Son 
Snattinger, L., 
Stakebake, J. L. 
Standard Mills, 
Thornburg, R., 
War, Miss Ella 
Williams.J. W., , 
Winchester Tannery, 
Winchester Machine W'k 
Winchester Wagon W'k: 
Winchester Woolen Mill 
Woolverton, C. W., . 



154 
1.S6 
161 

16.; 

■54 
149 
150 
156 
'5- 
158 
'59 

14S 

*l 

156 

163 

153 

163 
163 
156 
'5o 
159 
'5 1 
1 55 
160 

i57 
'63 
'57 

i6i 
158 
'58 

,63 

'53 

160 

'53 
■55 
'59 

161 

■63 
'49 
163 
'54 
'63 
'4§ 
163 
162 

163 
162 

163 
101 
163 
'47 
151 
'5-' 



UNION CITY. 

Adams, A., .... 
Barnes & Hough, , . 

Best, M 

Bran ham Hotel, . . . 
Branham's Hotel and Res- 
taurant, 170 

Buckingham, L. T., . . 170 



I7i 
179 
186 

1S1 



Carter, S. L., .... 
Castle & McDonald, . . 
Chenoweth St Campbell, 
Cincinnati Cheap Stor 
Citizens' Bank, . . 

Clark, R.J 

Commercial Bank, . 
Coons Bros., . . . 
Cowdery.Dr. D. B., 
CowderY, Mrs. D. B. 
Dunkel* A. B., . . 
Ebernez, A. H., . . 
Fisher, S. J., . . . 
Fey, Henry, . . . 
Gordon & Gist, . . 
Grah«, George & Son 
Gross, T. A. & Co.,^ 
Haney & Buffington,' 
Hardy, C. S , . . 
Hommowun, Levi, 
Hook Bros. & Co., 
Hornberger, E., . 
Humrichouse & Bros. 
Hutchinson, A. A., 
J aqua & Hardy, . . 
Keller, W. G., . . 
Kennedy, C. G., . 
Kerr, Miss M., . . 
Kerr, William, . . 
Kirshbaum, R. & Co., 
Knapp, Alex. A. & Co 
Koontz, John, . . 
Kuntz, Peter, . . . 
Lambert, J. W. & Co 
Lambert, Parent & Co 
Lanter, J. D., . . 
Mearick, W. M., . 
Ohio Flouring Mills, 
Orr House, . . . 
Piatt & Bolen, . . 
Prior, Charles, . . 
Proctor, Dr. J. A. & So 
Read, B. H.. .. . . 

Reeves, J. S. & Co., 
Romeiser, Valentine, 
Ross, G. W., . . . 
Schricker, J., . . . 
Shank, J. M., . . . 
Shockney i' Shockne 
Shugars, J. W. & Bro 
Simmons, A. L., . 
Smith Bros., . . . 
Smith, John D., . . 
Smith, W. K., . . 
Snook, J. H., . . . 
Star Liverv Stables, 
Starbuck Bros., . . 
Starbuck, J. S., . . 
Stewart & Wright, . 
Stoner, H., . . . 
Stumpp, G., . . . 
Sutton, Lew., . . . 
Swain Si Birt, . . 
The Winslow, . . 
Thokey, William . 
Turpen & Harris, 169 and 
Tyler, Miss M. E., . . 
Union City Boiler Work 



INDEX. 



Union City Carriage Man 




Hiatt, M. R., . . 


ufacturing Company, 


. 181 


Hiatt, N. B., . 


Union. City Foundry, . 


. !8 4 


Hiller.J. B., . . 


Union City Heat Fende 


r 


Junction Mills, . 


Manufacturing Co., 


• 173 


Kinney, C. D., . 


Vore, Samuel T. & Co., 


. 176 


Kitselman Bros., 


Walden, M. L., . . . 


. 186 


Kitsehnan, H. T. 


Williams, D. A. & Co., 


186 


Lemaux, G., . . 


Witham|<S: Anderson Co 


1S2 


McKew & Edger 


Worthington, W. T., . 


175 


Mann & Scott, . 


Wright i Stoner, . . 


1S6 


Payne, S. B., . . 
Re'tterJ. C, . . 


RIDGEYIIJ.K. 




Ridgeville Bank, 
Ritenour, J. F., . 


Allen, S. R., . 


189 


Seanev, J. W, . 


Barnes & Seaney, . . 


1S8 


Shoemaker, W.J. 


Champe Sisters, . . . 


189 


Siegler, George, . 


Cook, L. N., . . . . 


188 


Starbuck, W. C, 


Cook, Oscar, .... 


192 


Sumption House, 


Cunningham & Boswell 


192 


Wellinger, John, 
Whipple, W. H., 


Gegner, George L., . 


190 


Graham, T. A., . . . 


192 


Wood.A.J., . . 



Co 



192 
192 
192 
190 
192 
192 
191 
192 
192 
189 
190 
192 
187 
192 
[91 
192 
iSS 

191 
191 

19- 
190 

189 



Wood, Mrs. A. J., . . 
FARMI.AM), 



Barker & Mills, . 
Bates, J. C, . . 
Bly A: Thornburg, 
Branson a. Carter, 
Brunclape, S. P., . 
Burns, Dr. E. A., 
Clark, S. S., . . 
Davis, J. S., . . 
Gray, Nathan E , 
Grimes, J. W., . 
Grooms, John H., 
Mark. L. B., . . 
Reeves, John L ., 
Reitenour, J. H., 
Stinson, James H., 
Studebaker, H., . 
Watson, Geo. B., 
Wilson. W. W , . 



7 

192 



'21 

196 

'94 

3 
3 

196 
195 
195 
I9.> 
.96 

195 
.96 

193 

l 9Z 




Wayne County. 



The characteristic topographical fea- 
ture of the county is that of an elevated 
campaign, or table-land which gradually 
slopes from the northern boundary of the 
county to the south-west. The general 
elevation of the north part may he stated 
at 1,200 feet above mean ocean tide, and 
that of the southern part of the county 
at 900 feet. The county is well supplied 
with streams of living water, and the 
large area of level lands are covered with 
a grand forest which includes every va- 
riety of timber that grows in this latitude. 

Wayne County was organized in 1810, 
and was named in honor of General An- 
thony "Wayne. Previous to this time 
there were only three counties in the then 
Territory of Indiana, viz : Knox, Clark 
and Dearborn. "Wayne County was 
formed from a portion of the latter 
county. The early settlers of this county 
were mostly from North Carolina and 
Virginia, and belonged to the society of 
Friends. They were mostly intelligent, 
sober and industrious people. The first 
county seat was called the town of Wayne 
but subsequently Salisbury. The first 
court was held there October 28th, 1811. 
The county seat was removed to Centre- 
ville in 1816, but court was not held there 
until 1818. It remained there until re- 
moved to Richmond the present county 
seat, in 1875. The county taxes for the 
year the first court was held were 8468.40 
and some idea of this primitive period 
may be obtained from the following pro- 
vision price list for the year 1824. . 

Apples, dr. *abu.l.25<fc 1.50 Butter, uc Ih 4 to 5 

Peaches '• " 1.25 & 1.50 Beef, • VA 1 

Potatoes, " 25 Veal, " \% 2 

Com, " 10 15 Sugar, '• 4 5 

Beans, " 25 Tallow, " 5 

Turnips, " 12 Flax, " 8 10 

Flour, per ewt. 1 25 1 50 Chickens, p<-r doz. 50 

Wood, per cord, 37»^ Eggs, " 2 3 

This county is well supplied with rail- 
roads. The Pan-Handle road from Indi- 
anapolis to Pittsburg, follows the course 



of the old National road, passing through 
Dublin, Cambridge City, Germantown, 
Centrcville and Richmond; Fort Wayne 
& Richmond road running through Foun- 
tain City in Garden Township; Chicago 
division Pittsburg, Cincinnati & St. Louis 
road, from Richmond through Washing- 
ton and Hagerstown; Dayton & Rich- 
mond road; Richmond division Cincin- 
nati, Hamilton & Dayton road; Cam- 
bridge City and Columbus road; Fort 
Wayne, Muncie & Cincinnati road runs 
through Cambridge City; "White "Water 
Valley road from Cambridge City to Cin- 
cinnati, along the line of the old canal; 
also, a short line of road from Hagers- 
town to Cambridge City. In addition to 
this very extensive system of railroads 
there are innumerable gravel roads lead- 
ing in and out of all the principal villa- 
ges and towns in the county, so that in re- 
spect to internal improvements that fur- 
nish egress and ingress for travelers and 
commerce, no county in the state except 
Marion, can boast of greater facilities 
There are 88J68 miles of railroad, 12H> 
miles toll roads and turn pikes and 6<*~ 
miles of common road. 

The latest statistics show 252,136 acres 
of land entered for taxation, valued ait 
88,372,690; personal property 86,585,^62. 
In 1880 there was produced 660,195 bus. 
of wheat, 1,975,176 of corn and 287,155 
of oats. There were also 9,091 horse?, 
440 mules, 15,321 head of cattle, 50,433 
hogs and 18,505 sheep. The apple crop 
was worth 8304,289 and peaches 824,085. 

The numerous cities and towns in the 
county call for a large number of mer- 
cantile concerns in every branch of trade 
to supply its large population of over 
40,000 people, which added to the maay 
extensive manufacturing establishing 
conducted therin, combined with the rich 
agricultural country surrounding, mak-e 
it one of the first counties in the state. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 



This city, the largest in Wayne County, 
is among the leading commercial centers 
of the state, and is one of Indiana's finest 
cities. It is substantially built, is sur- 
rounded by one of the richest agricultu- 
ral sections in the Northwest, has ample 
railroad facilities and is enjoying a large 
and healthy commerce. We know of no 
-other town of its class in this part of the 
Union that so impresses the stranger with 
its metropolitan manners or goaheaditive- 
ness, yet it is plain to be seen that busi- 
ness is conducted on a solid, conservative 
basis, which we attribute to the predomi- 
nance of an element composed principally 
of members of the Society of Friends, 
whose antecedents were the original set- 
tlers here. 

EARLY HISTORY. 

It was in the latter part of 1806 that 
the settlement of Richmond was com- 
menced, much of the land in its vicinity 
liaving been taken up in that year. David 
Hoover and his companions are supposed 
to have been the first white men whe ex- 

?lored the territory north of Richmond. 
'he land was settled principally by the 
Friends, from North Carolina, some of 
them from that state direct, others after a 
brief residence in Ohio. John Smith 
-entered on what is now the south side of 
Main Street. Jeremiah Cox purchased 
his quarter section somewhat later, north 
of Main Street. Among the first families 
who settled here were those of Jerry Cox, 
John Smith, Elijah Wright, Frederick 
Hoover, Andrew Hoover, David Hoover, 
Wm. Bulla and John Harvey. John 
Smith commenced a store in a log build- 
ing, with barrels for supports to a counter 
of boards, in 1810. Robert Morrison 
started another store in 1814. Two tan 
yards were established in 1818, one by J. 
Smith for the benefit of Jos. Wilmot and 
the other by Robert Morrison. In 1816 
Smith laid out in town lots the land along 



Front an Pearl streets south of Main. The 
first tavern was a log building put up in 
1816 on lot 6, by Philip Harter. Ezra 
Boswell put up the first brewery about the 
time the town was first incorporated. The 
first post office was established in 1*18. 
Robert Morrison was postmaster and so 
continued up to 1829, the office being in a 
frame building s. w. cor. Main and Fourth 
streets. Joseph McLane had the first 
blacksmith shop. The first new-paper 
was the Richmond Weekly Intelligencer, 
issued in 1821 with Elijah Lacey as edi- 
tor and Joseph Scott as publisher. The 
Messrs. King had a woolen factory previ- 
ous to 1827 and in addition to carding 
and spinning began the manufacture of 
cloth, blankets, jeans, etc. Mr. Smith 
also had a paper mill and Dr. Cushman 
& Co. opened a distillery previous to this. 

THE CITY'S GROWTH. 

The date of the birth of the town is 
generally supposed to have been in 1*16; 
it had no corporate existence however un- 
til after Cox's addition in 1818, which em- 
braced lands north of Main St. and west 
of Marion. In conformity to an act of 
the legislature, the citizens met on Sep- 
tember first of the same year, and unani- 
mously declared themselves in favor of 
the incorporation of the town. Twenty- 
four votes were polled. On the 14th of 
September, at an election held at the same 
place, Ezra Boswell, Thomas Swain, Rob- 
ert Morrison, John McLane and Peter 
Johnson were elected Trustees. The 
authority given to the trustees by the 
general act under which the town was in- 
corporated being deemed inadequate, the 
citizens petitioned the legislature for a 
special charter, which was granted. The 
charter was adopted by a vote of the citi- 
zens, and borough officers elected March 
13th, 1834. Richmond was governed 
under this borough charter until 1S40, 
when it was incorporated as a city under 



10 



STATE QF INDIANA. 



a charter adopted by the citizens, and on 
the 4th of May a mayor and other city 
officers were elected. In 1865 a general 
law was passed authorizing the people of 
any town to establish a city government 
without a special act of the legislature. 
Under this law city officers are elected 
for two years. The city is now divided 
into five wards with two couneilmen from 
each ward It also has a complete fire 
department and a system of fire alarm 
boxes. The population was 200 in 1818; 
824 in 1828; 3,t00 in 1850; 12,743 in 
1880; while at the present time it is fully 
15,000 and rapidly increasing. 

CHURCHES AND SCHOOLS. 

A meeting of the Society of Friends 
was established here as early as 1807. The 
first meeting of the M. E. church was in 
1819, Presbyterian 1837, English Luthe- 
ran 1853, Catholic 1846, Episcopal 183s 
German Evangelical 1845, African M. E. 
1*36. Other denominations here are the 
Baptist, Evangelical, Christian, Sweden- 
borgian and United Presbyterian, which 
are represented by more than 20 different 
congregations, some of whom occupy edi- 
fices that would be a credit to any city. 
The educational advantages of Richmond 
are its pride and boast. A thorough 
graded system lias been adopted, 10 school 
buildings being used and the services of 
over 50 teachers required. Within one 
mile of the city on the National road, 
stands Earlham College, an institution 
owned by the Friends, having 160 acres 
of land in connection with its attractive 
buildings. There are most complete cour- 
ses of study and both sexes are admitted 
to equal privileges and opportunities. 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Robert Morrison, an early settler here 
and one of Richmond's most prominent 
and successful business men, founded the 
finepublic library which bears his name. 
Believing such an institution would con- 
duce to the publi'- good, he purchased a 
lot and erected a fine building containing 
library room, dwelling of librarian, etc. 
The cost of lot and improvements was 
812,500, the total donation however was 
818,000, all of u hich he devised to Wayne 
Township, of Wayne County, Ind., in 
trust, for the benefit of the inhabitants of 



said township forever. It opened in 1864 
with 6,000 volumes which have acace 
been increased to 10,000. 

MANUFACTURING. 

Richmond is indeed a manufacturing 
city and no other place of its size in tdhe 
state contains as many important ircnd 
thriving manufacturing concerns, wftiich 
fact explains its rapid progress. In 1*27 
Geo. B. Rowlett came here from Phila- 
delphia, Pa. This gentleman was in- 
strumental in making one of the fin* at- 
tempts at manufacturing here, which was 
the production of silk from the copoon, 
but he was compelled to abandon ths en- 
terprise. Since then one factory after 
another has been started until to-day we 
find here some of the largest concerns in 
the Union engaged in the manufacture of 
farm implements, mill machinery, coffins, 
school furnitnre, etc. The wholesale and 
jobbing trade is also quite extensive, sev- 
eral large concerns being located feere. 
The shipping facilities are unsurpassed, 
the railroads centering here being the 
Pan Handle, from Pittsburgh to Indian- 
apolis; Grand Rapids & Indiana, from 
Richmond through Ft. Wayne into Mich- 
igan; the Chicago Division of the Pitts- 
burgh, Cincinnati & St. Louis R. R_ and 
the Cincinnati, Richmond & Dayfom R. 
R., giving shippers the benefit of coiapete- 
ing lines north, south, east and west 
In conclusion we can truthfully say that 
that no point in the west offers gneater 
inducements for those seeking a locution 
than does Richmond. 

In the following series of brief descrip- 
tive articles, to which the attention aS. the 
reader is particularly invited, will belbund 
a large amount of useful and practical in- 
formation of the highest value. Through 
the medium of careful and eompete-v.it re- 
porters a detailed review of the manufac- 
turing and mercantile interests of fvich- 
mond has been prepared and dwell upon 
in separate articles, thus more fully reach- 
ing the objects of this work. From these 
much valuable information will fee im- 
parted with reference to this city; nits ad- 
vantages as a market for the purek.se of 
supplies, its opulent and enterprising busi- 
ness concerns (none of which havt been 
willingly omitted) and the striking di- 
versity of its resources. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 



11 



RICHMOND NATIONAL BANK, 
Cor- Fifth and Main Sts. 
Taking rank among the leading banking 
houses of this city and state, the Richmond 
National Bank since its organization has been 
characterized by that conservative and yet at 
the same time progressive policy which has 
contributed to its uniform success and popular 
favor,. This bank justly dates its origin back 
to 1S34, at which time it was established as the 
State Bank of Indiana, with Ach'lles Williams 
as President, Elijah Coffin, Cashier, and 
Charles F. Coffin, Teller, with a charter for 
21 years. Upon the expiration of the charter, 
in 185s, it was organized as a branch of the 
State Bank of Indiana, with Albert C. Blanch- 
ard as President and Charles F. Coffin as 
Cashier. In 1S65 it was again reorganized 
and chartered under the national banking laws 
as the Richmond National, with an authorized 
capital of $230,000, at which time Mr. Charles 
F. Coffin was chosen President and Albert H. 
Blanchard Cashier. In 1S73 Mr. Charles H. 
Coffin was elected Cashier, upon the retire- 
ment of Mr. Blanchard. The present officers 
of the bank are Charles F. Coffin, President, 
and Charles H. Coffin, Cashier. The present 
Board of Directors are Charles F. Coffin, S. 
R. Wiggins, David J. Hoerner, Eiwood Pat- 
terson and Charles H. Coffin. The present 
cash capital of the bank is $250,000 and its 
transactions embrace a legitimate banking 
business in loans, discounts, deposits, collec- 
tions and exchange — embracing the largest 
exchange, discount and collection business oi 
any similar institution in Eastern Indiana. It 
is a noteworthy fact that this institution was 
the last to suspend and the first to resume 
specie payment as the result ot the financial 
panic of the "seventies." Mr. Charles F. Cof- 
fin, the President, is a native of North Caro- 
lina but came to this city in 1S34. He has 
occupied many important positions of trust 
and responsibility in the various benevolent 
institutions of this state and declining to 
accept political preferment. Charles H. Coffin 
is a native of this city and since completing 
his literary education has been chiefly asso- 
ciated with this bank. 

WHITE WATER TANNERY, 

S. R. Wiggins & Son, Proprietors, 
No. 132 Second St. 
The foundations of this enterprise were laid 
as far back as 60 years ago by Mr. Daniel P. 
Wiggins, father of the senior member of the 
present firm, that gentleman having com- 
menced the tanning of leather in this city in 
1823. The business was, of course, rather 
small at the outset, but as energy will always 
tell, so it was in this case, and* the business 
grew steadily from year to year until from a 
small beginning it soon reached huge propor- 
tions v and after seeing it on a prosperous and 
solid basis, Mr. D. P. Wiggins resigned the 
care of it to his three son-, Messrs. S. R., C. 
O. and J. D. Wiggins. These gentlemen con- 



ducted the business for some time, continuing 
to enlarge and improve whenever nece-sarv, 
until finally, in 1S72, the present co-partner- 
ship was formed and has remained ir.tact up 
to the present writing. The White Water 
Tannery is one of the best equipped and most 
complete of the kind in the United Stales, 
with a total capacity of 150 comple'e h:i--s per 
week. The establishment embraces eight 
buildings, located on the south end of S-rcond 
St. and covering an acre of ground. These 
buildings contain 150 vats and the best grades 
of strictly pure oak fanned leather is pro- 
duced, including harness and upper leather, 
kipp and calf of a very superior qualitv. A 
60 horse power engine furnishes the motive 
power of the establishment, while about :6 
hands find steady employment the whole vear 
around. The firm enjoy the reputation of 
tanning the best leather'in the country and 
their trade extends over the entire United 
States. Mr. S. R. Wiggins, the senior —em- 
ber of the firm, was born on Lor.g I-ia-.d, 
N. Y-, and removed to Richmond -rt::h his 
father in 1S23. He acted in the capacity of 
Secretary of the Little Miami Raliro^i dur- 
ing its construction, was City Treasurer for 
the period of seven years and served the city 
in the Council for four terms. He :- a"so one 
of the Board of Directors of the R : c:.~or.d 
National Bank, one of the leading finan :iil 
institutions of the state. Mr. Hugh R. Wig- 
gins, his son, is a native of this city and the 
active member of the firm. Both gentlemen 
are thoroughly conversant with the tanning 
business, having become familiar with it at a 
very early age, and the large extent of their 
operations, together with their enterp.'.-e and 
integrity, is every way worthy the extended 
notice here given in connection with the grow- 
ing industries of the city. 



J. S. TAYLOR, Jr., 

Iron, Hardware, etc., North E St. 

The wholesale trade of the city of Rich- 
mond in nearly every branch of commercial 
activity has within a comparatively few years 
received a fresh impetu- from the* infusi a ot 
new vigor and enterprise into the old e?"ab- 
lished houses and the organization c: new 
ones with a determination to compete with the 
markets of more distant cities and furnish to 
dealers in the interior towns of Eastern Indi- 
ana and Western Ohio opportunities for pro- 
curing their supplies more expeditiouslj cir.d 
at a saving of freight charges and other ex- 
penses. In that special department of cur 
commercial system devoted to trie sa'e of bar 
iron, steel, wagon and carriage hard a ..-. •. j 
stock, etc., the city can offer to manufacturers 
and dealers advantages which car. not be 
readily duplicated in the great ci:ie< East or 
West, as can be easily demonstrated by :n 
inspection of the extensive stock of J. S. Tay- 
lor, Jr., whose warerooms are located ^n North 
E St.. opposite the passenger depot. This 
house was originally started by W. W. Fou'.ke 



12 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



as early as 1S54 as an exclusively retail estab- 
lishment. He was succeeded by the firm of 
A. Bradley & Sons, from whom the present 
proprietor purchased the stock and good will 
in 18S1. Since that time under his judicious 
management the increase in trade has been 
almost phenomenal. Mr. Tajjlor occupies at 
the above named location two entire floors and 
basement, each 25x132 feet in dimensions, of 
the commodious warehouse, where he carries 
a stock valued at about $20.coo, comprising 
iull lines of the best varieties of bar iron and 
steel, carriage and wagon hardware and trim- 
mings, carriage makers' supplies, felloes, hubs, 
shafts, spokes and general wood work in this 
line. He transacts both a wholesale and retail 
business, his annual sales closely approxi- 
mating $$0,000. Three assistants" are regu- 
larly employed and two traveling salesmen 
are constantly on the road in various sections 
of Indiana and Ohio, trom whence his trade is 
principally derived. Mr. Taylor is a native of 
Ohio and was born in 1S4.5. He came to 
this city in 1SS1, at which time he engaged in 
the business which is now occupying his at- 
tention and which has under his energetic 
menagement assumed its present proportions 
and established a claim to recognition as one 
of the leading houses of its class in this section 
of the state. 



RICHMOND CITY MILL WORKS, 

General Mill Machinery, Sixteenth 
and North F Sis. 

Among the notable improvements which 
were invented and brought into use at about 
the time of the adoption of the Federal Con- 
stitution were those of Oliver Evans, of Penn- 
sylvania, in respect to the manufacture of 
flour, the importance of which may perhaps 
be sufficiently indicated by saying that in all 
the subsequent processes of invention no radi- 
cal change has ever been made in the system 
of milling machinery, as Mr. Evans devised 
it, and that it constitutes to-day the mechani- 
cal basis upon which all the extensive flouring 
mills of the United States and Europe are 
operated. As in all other branches of indus- 
trial enterprise in America, important modifi- 
cations and improvements have been intro- 
duced from time to time, notably those known 
in commercial and milling phraseology as the 
"new process," which, while embodying many 
new and valuable ideas, still retains the most 
salient features and essential principles of Mr. 
Evans' early improvements. Utilizing in 
their operations every improvement which 
practical experience and actual tests have 
demonstrated to be of value and introducing 
many specialties of their own invention, the 
Richmond City Mill Works, of this city, stand 
to day among the foremost establishments in 
the United States engaged in the manufacture 
ot flouring mills and mill machinery, ranking 
in the extent of their operations third of this 
class in the Union, and in the general com- 
dleteness of their works, equipment, excel- 

\ 



lence and reliability of their products equal 4© 
any. This important addition to the produc- 
tive industries of Richmond had iis inception 
in 1S76, when a «tock company was organized 
and incorporated under the lawsol the statecof 
Indiana with a capital stock of $75 < 00 and Hie 
present works were erected. Since that time, 
although the nominal capital remains the 
same, the accumulated earnings and surplus 
have been invested in the business*, making 
the actual rapi al employed largelv in excels 
of the original amount. The pi int'ot these ok- 
tensive works, at the corner of Sixteenth and 
North F Sts., covers an area of about fwe 
acre*, upon which is erected numerous sub- 
stantial and conveniently arranged buildings, 
among which may be especially mentioned 
the main structure, containing office- pattern 
rooms, wood working department and ma- 
chine shop, 60x150 feet in size, to which is 
attached a wing or "L" of the same dimen- 
sions. The building used for the stone departt- 
ment is 60x100 feet, the foundry building 
50x60 feet, the blacksmith shop 40x50, and 
the wood working shop, occupied for fee 
manufacture of bolting chests and kindraid 
articles, is 32x200 feet, while in addition tto 
these are numerous smaller buildings, used 
lor a variety of purposes. Owing to Che 
heavy character of the work constructed fierce, 
the mechanical operations are all conducted 
upon the ground floor, the aggregate area cof 
which is not less than 36,000 square feet. 
The processes of manufacture are facilitated 
and expedited by the use of improved special 
machinery in each department, the motive 
force for which is supplied by an So hensse 
power engine, built expressly for this com- 
pany by the well known Buckeye Engine 
Company, of Salem. O. An average force o»f 
125 hands is employed, the greater portion tof 
which are skilled mechanics and practical 
millwrights, and the weekly pay roll readies 
fully $1,300. The facilities enjoyed by ihis 
company as mechanical contractors and manu- 
facturers of mill stones and mill machinery 
and for the construction and thorough equip- 
ment of flouring mills in any section of Ihe 
United States, are not surpassed by those of 
any contemporaneous establishment, whik- a 
prominent specialty is made of remodeling 
old mills and introducing the u nevv proce»s" 
system. The limits allotted in the present 
sketch will not permit a detailed description of 
the various products of these works and euwen 
an attempt at enumeration would fail to <-do 
justice to the subject. Suffice it to say fhat 
the company are fully prepared to funihsh 
estimates and make contracts for the construc- 
tion and equipment of flouring mills in wmj 
part of the country, for remodeling old mills 
entire or in part and also for furnishing amy 
and every article required in the construction 
or repair of milling machinery, from tthe 
heaviest and most complicated device to 'the 
very minutest detail. The company issue a 
finely and elaborately illustrated descriptive 
catalogue and special circulars, giving mill 



14 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



information as to the merits, advantages and 
economy of their products, which will be 
found to be invaluable to millers or those con- 
templating the erection of mills upon either 
the old or new process plans. The original 
officers of the company were Joseph G. Lemon, 
President; N. W. Brings, Secretary and 
Treasurer, and Charles F. Walters, Mechani- 
cal Engineer. The office of Secretary and 
Treasurer was vacated in November, 1S77, by 
the death of Mr. Briggs, and Mr. Leonard T. 
Lemon was elected as his successor. With 
this exception the original board has conducted 
the affairs of the company since its organiza- 
tion, with the most marked and gratifying 
degree of success, the annual transactions at 
the present time amounting to more than 
$300,000, with a demand for their products 
extending to every state in the Union and to 
the Dominion of Canada. The progressive 
policy ol the company since its inception and 
the determination of the officers to excel 
rather than to compete in their chosen field of 
industrial enterprise have made the Richmond 
City Mill Works the leading estiblishment of 
its kind in the state of Indiana and one of the 
most important {actors of our city's commer- 
cial importance and manufacturing thrift. 



WAYNE CREAMERY COMPANY, 
Butter, Cheese, Produce, etc., 32S axd 
330 Maix St. and 2 Fort Wayne Ave. 
Among the largest, thoroughly equipped and 
admirably conducted establishments of this 
class in the United States and the most exten- 
sive one in the state of Indiana is that located 
at 32S, 330 and 334 Main St., Richmond, 
•where, under the designating title of the 
"Wayne Creamery Company," the manufac- 
ture of fine creamery butter is conducted upon 
a scale of magnitude and upon scientific prin- 
ciples which entitles it to prominent recogni- 
tion among the most important industries of 
the state. Although established as recently as 
1SS1, the growth of this business has been 
almost phenomenal. The production of but- 
ter auring the first week of its existence did 
not exceed 150 pounds, while at the present 
time (18S3) they are turning out upon an 
average 15.000 pounds per month and have a 
daily capacity tor manufacturing 1,000 pounds, 
which will undoubtedly be taxed to its fullest 
extent during the current year. The premi- 
ses occupied, which have "been fitted up ex- 
pressly for the business, comprise a large and 
commodious double brick structure, affording 
ample floor space for the various departments, 
and 20 assistants are regularly employed in 
the various processes of manufacture. From 
the comparatively insignificant commence- 
ment of this enterprise, previously noted the, 
business has steadily increased until the annual 
transactions now exceed $75,000. In every 
department of the business as conducted at 
this model establishment, from that of gather- 
ing the material from the farmers to the final 
preparation of the butter for market, there are 
numerous commendable features, a few of 



which may be appropriately mentioned in ffai* 
connection as pertaining to a branch of indus- 
trial enterprise not generally understood or 
appreciated by the community at large. The 
cream used here is gathered fresh every day 
from not less than 500 farm dairies within "a 
radius of about 50 miles, by a number of men, 
who have each an established route. The 
cream is gathered in large tin cans devised 
especially for this purpose and so arranged as 
to show the number of inches of cream con- 
tained therein. All cream bought is measured 
by the inch, one inch in depth and 12 in 
diameter being regarded as equivalent to one 
pound of butter. The large cans contain an 
inner vessel for the reception of the cream, 
this vessel being so arranged as to float in the 
cream in the larger receptacles, thereby pre- 
venting by its easy motion any undue dis- 
turbance or injury to the cream in transit. 
After being brought to the creamery it is 
deposited in specially arranged refrigerating 
vats, where the proper temperature is carefully 
maintained while awaiting the churping pro- 
process, which is done in large wooden cylin- 
ders kept constantly revolving at the desired 
speed by steam power, supplied by one engine 
and boiler. The churning rooms are models 
of neatness, cleanliness and systematic ar- 
rangement. Large quantities of ice are used 
and the purest spring water obtained on the 
premises is employed in the various processes 
of manipulation. The waste water from the 
ice in the refrigerators is utiliz* d for keeping 
the butter milk and sweet milk at the proper 
temperature. A special feature of the busi- 
ness which has also attained considerable pro- 
portions is the furnishing to city patrons pure 
milk, cream, butter-milk, etc., which is fur- 
nished by daily delivery wagons in any desired 
quantity. The butter and fine, cream cheese 
manufai tured are far superior to the ordinary 
home made articles, owing to the facilities 
enjoyed for their production by scientific 
methods, and in addition to a large local de- 
mand, this company ships in large lots to the 
cities of Cincinnati, Philadelphia, Baltimore, 
New York, etc., where the trademark of the 
"Wayne Creamery Company" is regarded as a 
guarantee of excellence and superiority and a 
standard of value with the better class of met- 
ropolitan dealers. The butter is solid, sweet 
and delicious, free from milk or water, and is 
neatly packed in different sized tubs or firkins 
for shipment. The company, in addition to 
the large amount of choice* butter handled, 
also deal extensively in full cream cheese and 
country produce at wholesale, and for refer- 
ence are permitted to quote both the First and 
Second National Banks of this city, as welC as 
the leading merchants and business men. 
The individual members of the firm as at pres- 
ent organized are Messrs. H. T. Burns, J. J. 
Russell, J. G. Chandlee. G. C. Stevens, W. F. 
Hiatt, C. Shute, W. A. Howard. Mr. Stevens, 
upon whom devolves the general management 
of the manufacturing department, has devoted 
more than a quarter of a century to the inwes- 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 



15 



tigation, perfection and development of this 
special branch of industry and to his efforts 
and enterprise is largely due the financial suc- 
cess which has attended the operations of the 
Wayne Creamery Company, and its envi- 
able reputation as one of the most popu- 
lar creameries of the Union. 



FULTON BOILER AND SHEET IRON 
WORKS, 
Jerry Cowhig, Prop., No. 269 Fort 
Wayne Ave., North of Union Depot. 
These widely known works were founded 
by the present proprietor, Mr. Jerry Cowhig, 
in 1S76, and since their first inception the 
business has had a constant and gradual in- 
crease in volume and territory. As an indica- 
tion of the growth of the business it may be 
stated that in the first year of its foundation 
the annual business was but $S,ooo, while its 
transactions for the past year was not less 
than $34,000. Mr. Cowhig occupies for manu- 
facturing; and repairing purposes a building 
35x110 feet in dimensions, which is thoroughly 
equipped with all the necessary modern appli- 
ances for the prosecution of the business, 
including a splendid 12 horse power engine 
and boiler for supplying the motive power. 
An average force of iS skilled workmen here 
find employment in the production of locomo- 
tive or stationary boilers of every description, 
lard and oil tanks and coolers, smoke stacks 
and breechings and plate and sheet iron work 
■of all kinds. The Fulton Boiler and Sheet 
Iron Works enjoy the amplest facilities for 
supplying on liberal terms all orders in any 
■department of the business or doing all 
descriptions of job'work or repairing to order. 
Large contracts have been filled by this house 
for various remote sections of the Union, all of 
■which have secured the fullest approval of the 
parties concerned. Among the number may 
be mentioned Messrs. Black & Clawson, 
manufacturers of portable engines and paper 
mill machinery at Hamilton, O., and the 
Niles Tool Works, of the same place, also for 
J. H. Karrick & Co., manufacturers of millers' 
machinery, at Minneapolis, Minn.; John E. 
Randell & Co., machinists, at Memphis, Tenn., 
and numerous others in various parts of the 
Union. The reputation enjoyed by the Ful- 
ton Boiler Works, of this city, for superior and 
reliable work is not excelled" by any contem- 
poraneous establishment East or West and 
justly commends it to the most favorable con- 
sideration of those interested, at home or 
abroad. Mr. Jerry Cowhig, the proprietor of 
these works, is a native of Ireland, where he 
was born April 14th, 1845. He came to this 
country when but four years of age and after 
learning his trade in this city devoted about 19 
jears to the business in the employ of others, 
much of the time holding the position of fore- 
man of the works in which he was employed. 
Through his spirit of enterprise and the "effi- 
ciency of his work he has now established an 
industry which in all essential respects will 
rank with (heleading boiler works of the West 



ZELLER Sc CO , 

Steam Cracker Bakers and Confec- 
tioners, Nos. 915, 917, 919 and 921 
Main St. 

To the enterprise, energy and business sagac- 
ity of such representative houses as Messrs. 
Zeller Sc Co ., the thriving city of Richmond is 
largely indebted for the evidences of prosperity 
and commercial thrift which on every hand 
confront the visitor, suggestive of the pro- 
gressive spirit of the age and the development 
of the manifold natural and acquired advant- 
ages and resources of our beautiful inland 
metropolis. In no one of our great ind us trial 
enterprises has the march of progress been 
more conspicuously exemplified than in the 
production of the "various kinds of crackers 
which constitute to-day so important an arti- 
cle of traffic, by the means of improved labor 
saving machinery and ingenious devices for 
accellerating their manufacture, improving 
their quality and at the same time lessening 
the cost of production. From the primitive 
processes of manufacturing by hand in neces- 
sarily limited quantities to the introduction of 
cunningly contrived machinery, propelled by 
steam power, with capacity apparently unlim- 
ited, is a very long step indeed. Yet in the 
progress from the first named condition to the 
last in the city of Richmond, scarcely a quar- 
ter of a century has elapsed and the business 
to-day has assumed proportions of immense 
magnitude. Improved machinery and steam 
power were first introduced into this city as a 
factor of the bakery business about the year 
1S60 by Mr. Mark Lewis, and then only upon 
a comparatively limited scale, the resources of 
his factory at that time requiring only the 
assistanceof two or three hands and the diurnal 
consumption ot flour not exceeding four bar- 
rels. After conducting the business for two 
or three years. Mr. Lewis was succeeded by 
Mr. Dewi'tt C. Bowers, who shortly after ward's 
disposed of his interest in the house to the 
firm of Bradbury & Strattan, who were in 
turn succeeded by Mr. D. K. Zeller in :S66, 
the present partnership being formed in 1S74- 
Under the admirable and energetic rr.2r.age- 
ment of Mr. Zeller the business increased to 
such an extent as to necessitate enlarged 
facilities and more commodious quarters, and 
in 1S69 Mr. Zeller erected a new building at 
the present location, three stories in height 
and 41x50 feet in dimensions. Since that time 
another spacious structure 40x120 feet in size 
has been constructed and the large space is 
to-day scarcely adequate for the transacrl^n of 
the extensive and steadily increasing trade of 
this popular house, which now extends to all 
sections of Indiana, Illinois and Ohio, aggre- 
gating more than $125,000 per annum. The 
manufacturing department is supplied with 
the latest improved designs of mac hi n e ry, 
operated by one 40 horse power engine and 
boiler, and an average force of 25 skilled and 
experienced operatives are employed in the 
various departments. This firm manufacture 
a variety of brands of plain and fancy cr-jkers, 



16 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



■which have come to be regarded as standards 
of excellence by the trade, and also carry in 
stock a large and finely selected assortment of 
the choicest varieties of French and American 
confectionery, which they are enabled to offer 
to the trade at prices as low as can be quoted 
by the leading manufacturers of our great 
cities, thus effecting to dealers a great saving 
in freight, as well as facilities for replenishing 
their stock on short notice, which cannot fail 
to be appreciated by close and careful buyers 
in territory contiguous to this desirable mar- 
ket. This is the most extensive house in the 
bakery and confectionery line in the state, not 
excepting any in Indianapolis, and from 50 to 
70 barrels of the choicest flour are daily con- 
sumed in the manufacture of the specialties 
for which they have acquired so widespread 
and deservedly high a reputation. Mr. Daniel 
K. Zeller, the senior member of this firm, is a 
native of Butler County, O., where he was 
born in 1S22. He has resided in Richmond 
since 1S64 and been prominently identified 
with the business interests of the city ever 
since that time, as well as with the growth, 
development and progress of its material wel- 
fare. He has for several terms represented 
his ward in the City Councils and taken an 
active and influential part in all enterprises 
having for their aim and object the best inter- 
ests of the city and the advancement of its 
prosperity. His son and business associate, 
Mr. John G. Zeller, upon whom devolves the 
general management of this extensive estab- 
lishment, is eminently qualified by education 
and experience for the responsible position 
which he so acceptably fills. He came to 
Richmond with his father in 1S64 and has 
been a member of the firm since 1S74. 



W. C. STARR & SON, 

Manufacturers of Every Style of 
Saddlery Chains, Bridle Bits and 
Genuine Root Hames, S. W. Cor. 
Twelfth St. and Railroad. 
This well known manufactory was founded 
as far back as 1S32 by Mr. James Cunning- 
ham, who conducted* it for some time, and 
after other successors came into the possession 
of Messrs. W. C. and Benjamin Starr in 1S66, 
the present firm name then being adopted. 
The premises occupied for manufacturing pur- 
poses embrace two substantial buildings, one 
two and the other one story in height, one be- 
ing 60x74 an ^ tr >e other 58x67 feet in dimen- 
sions, both thoroughly equipped with all the 
latest and most approved machinery and 
appliances for the manufacture of genuine 
Root hames, chains of every description and 
bridle bits. A working force of 60 skilled arti- 
zans are regularly employed and the motive 
power of the establishment is furnished by a 
40 horse power engine and boiler. This is the 
only manufactory of the kind in the state of 
Indiana and is one of the largest and most 
complete of its class in the United States. 
Telephonic connection is enjoyed with all 
parts of this and adjoining cities and towns. 



Its trade is very large and extends to all parte 
of the Union. The high standard of goods- 
here produced, both as to style and quality, 
commands the general approval of both dealere- 
and horsemen. The present individual mem- 
bers of the firm are W. C. Starr and his son, 
Horace C. Starr. Mr. Starr, Sr., is a native ®f 
Pennsylvania but has been a resident of this- 
city for over half a century and has witnessed: 
its growth from a comparitively small village 
to its present populous and flourishing condi- 
tion. Mr. Horace Slnrr was born in Ohio 
and has resided here for the past 20 year*. 
The energetic and efficient business methods 
which have characterized the operations af 
this house have largely contributed to the 
commercial importance and thrift of thl» 
growing municipality and commands the at- 
tention of dealers in various sections of the 
United States. 



FRY BROTHERS, 

Planing Mills, Etc., Nos. 13 and 15 

South Eleventh Street. 
The most extensive and important house he 
this city engaged in the manufacture of door*^ 
sash, blinds, window and door frames, moulfl- 
ings, counters, desks, brackets, newells, stair 
rails, posts, etc., is that of Messrs. Fry Broth- 
ers, located on South Eleventh, near Main St., 
where spacious and conveniently arrangeiL 
buildings, two and three stories in height, cov- 
ering a ground space of 60XS3 feet are occu- 
pied for manufacturing purposes. The works, 
are thoroughly equipped with the most a$> 
proved modern designs of wood working ma- 
chinery, operated by one fifty horse power en- 
gine and boiler, and an average force of iS 
skilled and experienced workmen is regularly 
employed, turning out annually, not less thansi 
$30,000 worth of finished products in the vari- 
ous articles enumerated above. This houfiSi 
was established by its present enterprising; 
proprietors in 1S77, and while their trade fes 
largely of a local character, they have also 
a steadily increasing patronage throughout the 
adjacent counties in Indiana and Ohio. The 
facilities enjoyed by Messers. Fry Brothers for 
procuring their supplies in a rough state, direct 
from the lumber producing and manufacturing^ 
districts, and for the manufacture of the mo*." 
reliable and finely finished articles in their 
line, are not surpassed at any similar establish- 
ment in this section and their prices are uni- 
formly the lowest consistent with first-clans- 
material and workmanship. Their office en- 
joys telephonic communication with city and 
adjacent towns, through which business w3Ii 
receive prompt attention. The members ®f 
the firm are both natives and life long resi- 
dents of Indiana, and in addition to bein.^ 
thoroughly practical and experienced in all the 
dctails of the manufacturing departments they- 
are recognized as among our most energetic:, 
public spirited and reliable business men,., 
whose contracts are always fulfilled to the let- 
ter and whose representations will at all timrs- 
be found to conform strictly with the facts. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 



17 



GAAR, SCOTT & CO., 

Steam and Horse Powers, Threshing 
Machines, Portable and Traction- 
engines, Saw Mills, etc., Cor. Sixth 
and North F Sts. 
The rapidly augmented popula- 
tion of the great West and the 
consequent development of its 
immense natural resources, the 
cultivation of its prolific prairies, 
the preparation of their products 
for the markets of the world, the 
felling of its boundless forests and 
the manufacture of lumber for 
domestic uses and for shipment 
abroad have contributed to the 
demand for new and im [-roved 
devices, stimulated invention and 
necessitated the organization of 
great manufacturing enterprises, 
the wonder and admiration of 
foreigners and one of the most 
important elements of our na- 
tional wealth, progress and pros- 
perity. Among the most exten- 
sive and widely known manu- 
facturing establishments of the 
United States whose products 
have not only acquired a national ^ 
reputation but have been exported 
to various nations ot the old 
world, there is none more worthy 
of conspicuous consideration and 
prominent recognition than the 
old 

ducted 
of Gaar 
mond 
origi 
when 
posed 
ton, " 

Robert Chandler, commenced 
operations in this city as manu- > 
facturers of stoves, etc. This en- r 
terprise, inaugurated nearly half 3 
a century ago upon a necessarily | 
limited scale, was the foundation 3 
upon which has since been built ^ 
the magnificent business of toj ' 
day. In 1S42 this firm, which 
had been superceded by J. M. & 
J. H. Hutton, built the first 
threshing machine, or chaff pilery 
From the primitive machine ot 
that period to the perfected 
"Peerless" Thresher of the pres- 
ent day has been a long stride 
indeed in the history of mechani- 
cal progress and the advances 
which have been made may fur- 
nish an apt illustration of the 
progressive spirit which has char- 
acterized all the operations of 
this great company and their 
growth as an important industry since that 
time. In 1849 the firm of A. Gaar & Co. suc- 
ceeded to the business, the following named 



members constituting the firm at that time: 
James Gaar, Abram Gaar, J. M. Gaar X Wil- 
liam G. Scott. In 1850 the fhanufacture of 
threshing machinery was commenced upon a 
more extensive scale and in 1S70 a s'ock com- 







tf *§ 







$K? 



panv was organized and incorporated ur.der 
the laws of the state of Indiana, at which time 
the present designating title was adopted. 



13 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



The works at the present time (a bird's eye 
view of which accompany this sketch) cover a 
ground space of about 12 acres, upon which 
are erected 15 solid and substantial buildings, 
equipped throughout with the mo-,t perfect 
machinery, especially adapted for the purposes 
for which" it is employed, the propelling force 
of which is supplied by one 250 horse powey 
engine and four large boilers. Throughout the 
entire establishment the most perfect system 
prevail-;, the operations being conducted under 
nine separate sub divisions or departments, 
each under the immediate supervision of ex- 
perienced and efficient foremen. An average 
force of 450 operatives are employed, a large 
proportion of which are skilled artificers, 
necessitating the weekly disbursement of more 
than $5,000 for the item of labor alone. While 
it would be impossible to enter into a detailed 
description of the various products of this 
mammoth manufacturing establishment, a 
brief enumeration of the most important will 
be given: Improved traction engines, with 
iron wheels, rtfver.-e link motion, compensating 
gear and new patent steering attachment; a 
new style high mounted portable engine; side 
mounted circular fire box portable threshing 
engine; the new "Peerless" thresher; vibra- 
ting thresher; "Grand Gold Medal" and 
"New Modern" apron separators; new mount- 
ed adjustable straw stacker; improved clover 
huller and separator; four horse power en- 
gines; pony circular saw mill*; improved 
standard double saw mills; improved portable 
saw mill engines, etc. The company publish 
elaborately illustrated descriptive catalogues, 
containing full information concerning thjeir 
numerous products, testimonials, etc., which 
will be furnished gratuitously to all applicants. 
More than 35.000 ot these catalogues are cir- 
culated annually, reaching all sections of the 
Union, thus aiding materially in disseminating 
the fame of the city of Richmond as a manu- 
facturing metropolis and the site of one of the 
largest manufactories of threshing machinery 
in the world. The machines manufactured 
here are shipped to all sections of the United 
States and territories, to Sweden, Russia and 
other countries of Europe, the annual trans-. 
actions reaching more than $850,000. Messrs. 
Abram Gaar, John M. Gaar and William G. 
Scott, the principal stockholders of the com- 
pany, are skilled practical mechanicians who 
have been identified with this enterprise since 
its inception, and to their skill, sagacity and 
business ability the city of Richmond is in- 
debted for the immense benefits which have 
accrued from the establishment here of the 
mo»t extensive and important iudustry of the 
state and one of the largest manufacturing 
concerns of the Union. 



GETZENDANNER &c BRACKEN, 

Marble Works, 43 North Eighth St. 
Formerly the subject of tombstones was con- 
sidered a very melancholy one and the articles 
themselves bore an Impressive air, suggestive 
of mould, decay and dust. But with the ad- 



vance of art, notably monumental art, th' e 
establishments dealing in these articles 5 s 
brightened by a new and freshened air. Ome 
breathes in an artistic presence inspirations 
which rob the surroundings of their sombre 
hue and give a tone of even pleasure to the 
beholder whilst making selections in remem- 
brance of some loved form which has passed 
to the other shore. These thoughts were 
suggested by a recent visit to the establish- 
ment of Messrs. Getzendanner & Bracken, 
located at No. 43 North Eighth St., where a 
great variety of beautiful and artistic designs 
in monuments and tombstones are constantly 
on exhibition, manufactured from designs pre- 
pared by the enterprising proprietors of the^e 
works, from the finest varieties of American 
and Scotch granite and American and Italian 
marbles and which, as works of art, will com- 
pare favorably with the finest productions of a 
similar character in the most noted cemeteries 
of America. These works were established 
by the present proprietors in November, 1S&;, 
and are the largest and most complete in the 
city. The building in which the business is 
carried on is a large and commodious bricBc 
structure, 20x200 feet in dimensions, in whirih 
six skilled and experienced artizans in marble 
are kept constantly engaged. The stock car- 
ried is a large and valuable one and the firm 
enjoys an extensivejtrade in this city and adja- 
cent territory. Mr. Frank Getzendanner is a. 
native of Hamilton County, O., and was born 
in the year 1S49. Mr. John L. Bracken is a 
native of Indiana and was born in the year 
1S49 also. Both gentlemen are practical mar- 
ble workers, honest and upright in all the-r 
dealings, and among the business men «sff 
Richmond occupy no unenviable position. 



CHRIS. F. SCHAEFER & CO., 

Wholesale Notions, Fancy Gooia*, 
Toys, etc., No. 417 North Eighth St - . 
and 811 North E St. 
Among the representative establishments 
whose efforts to secure and retain the trade <uf 
dealers throughout this section have been re- 
warded with a most encouraging degree of 
success, none are entitled to more favorablle 
consideration than that of Messrs. Chris. ~\ 
Schaefer Al 'Co., dealers in notions, far 
goods, toys, etc. This house was establisl 
in 1877 by the present senior member of t . 
firm. In 1S80 Mr. A. L. McMeans was ad- 
mitted to an interest in the business and the 
present firm name and style adopted. Tflae 
premises occupied at the location above desig- 
nated embrace the entire two floors of tfloe 
substantial brick structure, 22x100 feet in 
dimensions, fronting on North Eighth St., 
with an additional "L" 12x45 feet in size, with 
an entrance on North E St., the entire space 
being utilized for the display of an admira&Iy 
selected assortment of miscellaneous merchan- 
dise pertaining to that comprehensive classifi- 
cation of mercantile pursuits which is .in 
America denominated notions, embracing nn 
almost unlimited variety of useful and orira- 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 



19 



mental small wares, the enumeration of which 
would occupy more space than the limits 
allotted in the present volume would permit. 
The stock also comprises a dazzling and at- 
tractive array of fancy goods, ornaments, toys, 
etc, which the firm is enabled to offer to the 
trade at rates as low as similar articles can be 
purchased in the great metropolitan establish- 
ments East or West, possessing as they do the 
most complete facilities for obtaining goods 
direct from first hands in this and foreign 
countries. The stock carried embraces a large 
variety of goods imported from various for- 
eign countries. This firm are also manufac- 
turers of woolen hosiery of a superior quality 
as compared with similar products of other 
factories. During a successful career of seven 
years the trade of this house has steadily in- 
creased in volume, showing an increase of 
more than 35 per cent over that of 1S77. The 
trade is derived principally from Eastern Indi- 
ana and Western Ohio, although their books 
show that their transactions extend to even 
more remote sections of these and adjacent 
states. Mr. Clu-is. F. Schaeier is a native of 
Wurtemburg, Germany, but has resided in 
this country since iS65*and in Richmond for 
the past 17 years, during which time he has 
been engaged continuously in the notion and 
•dry goods trade. Mr. A. L. McMeans was 
born in Henry County, Ind., and previous to 
the formation of the present partnership had 
been for several years engaged as traveling 
salesman. Few business men in the West are 
better or more favorably known throughout 
this section and it is safe to assert that none 
enjoy a more enviable reputation for probity 
and integrity in all his transactions. The 
house, which we have briefly noticed above, is 
■eminently worthy of that consideration of the 
business world which has been so generously 
accorded to it and is cordially commended as 
a desirable one with which to establish pleasant 
and profitable business relations. 



RAY & HARVEY, 

Wholesale Fancy Grocers, Nos. 419 
North Eighth St. and S09 North E St. 
The leading house making an exclusive 
specialty of handling what is now known in 
mercantile parlance as fancy groceries and 
.grocers' sundries in Eastern Indiana is that of 
Messrs. Ray & Harvey, of Nos. 419 North 
Eighth St. and S09 North E St. This house, 
although established as recently as 1SS2, has 
already secured a trade amounting to not less 
than $200,000 per annum and exhibited unmis- 
takable evidences of its ability to successfully 
compete with similar establishments in the 
great cities of the East and West in supplying 
to the merchants in interior towns ot Indiana 
and Ohio those indispensable articles ot every 
day consumption comprising their stock in 
"trade. The premises occupied for sales and 
storage purposes is a substantial brick struc- 
ture with a frontage on North Eighth St. of 
ao feet and a depth of 130 feet, connecting at 
the rear with an "L " the entrance to which is 



at 809 North E St The stock comprises a 
full and complete assortment of the choicest 
varieties of imported and American fancy 
groceries, fruits, fish, pickles, canned and 
botth d goods, foreign and domestic condi- 
ments, sauces, relishes, etc., and grocers' sun- 
dries generally, selected with great care 
especially to meet the requirements of the 
better class of trade in this section. Tele- 
phonic connection is enjoyed with all parts of 
the city and adjoining towns. Eight -ales- 
men and assistants, in addition to the members 
of the firm, devote their special attention to 
the interests of their numerous customers, 
filling orders, etc., from dealers in various 
portions of Eastern Indiana ar.d Western 
Ohio. Mr. Nathan H. Ray is a native and 
lifelong resident of this state and in his asso- 
ciation with the present enterprise begins a 
commercial career which cannot fail to -ecure 
prominence and success. Mr. William E. 
Harvey, also an Indianaian by birth, has been 
identified with the grocery trade for several 
years, having been, prior to the formation of 
the present partnership, connected with a well 
known wholesale grocery house of this city 
for a period of 10 years, in which he was 
recognized as controlling one of the largest 
annual trades among traveling salesmen in 
this section of the stite, enjoying in the high- 
est degree the confidence and good will of his 
patrons. The members of the firm bring to 
the enterprise in which they have embarked 
under the most auspicious circumstances ripe 
experience, business sagacity of a high order 
and an enviable reputation for integrity, 
prebity and honorable dealings. 



WILLIAM H. MIDDLETON i: CO. 
Manufacturers of Sash, Doors and 
Blinds, etc., Nos. 162 and 1G4 Fort 
Wayne Ave. 

The extensive planing mills conducted br 
William H. Midd'eton & Co., at Nos. 162 and 
164 Fort Wayne Ave., were originally estab- 
lished by William Cain & Sons in 1S71, who 
were succeeded by the firm of Cain JC Bayliss. 
This firm conducted the business until 187$, 
when they were succeeded by the present firm, 
who have* since then continued the business. 
The building occupied is a substantial two 
story brick structure, 40x130 feet in dimen- 
sion's, with basement and ample yard room, 
and is fitted up in the most thorough manner, 
with the latest improved wood working ma-* 
chinery for the rapid manufacture of sash t 
doors, frames, blinds and mouldings, brackets, 
mantles and inside finish. This firm is pre 
pared to fill contracts in this department to 
carpenters and builders or dealers guarantee- 
ing quality of material and lowest standard 
prices, as well as doing all kinds of job work 
pertaining to this department of trade, the 
motive power being furnished by a 40 horse 
power engine and boiler. Twelve .Ail led 
mechanics are employed and the establish- 
ment is one of the largest and most complete 
of its kind in Wayne County, possessing the 



20 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



most ample facilities for supplying the articles 
of manufacture in which they are engaged 
upon as liberal terms as any contemporaneous 
establishment in the state, the annual amount 
of business transacted being about $25,000. 
They enjoy telephonic communications with 
all neighboring cities. Mr. Middleton, the 
senior member of the firm, was for many 
years foreman of the works for the former 
proprietors and it was under his supervision 
that the present buildings were erected. The 
remaining members of the firm are S. B. Wil- 
liamson, H. W. Talhelm and August Kamp, 
all practical artisans in wood and thoroughly 
experienced in the business in which they are 
engaged. 

VAN D. BROWN, 

Grocer, Southwest Cor. Main and 

Ninth Sts. 
Occupying a conspicuous rank among the 
representative merchants of Indiana in this 
distinctive department of commercial enter- 
prise is that of Mr. Van D. Brown, who is 
entitled to special recognition in the present 
historical and statistical review of our inland 
metropolis. His model establishment occu- 
pies the first floor and basement, each 22x90 
feet in dimensions, where is displayed in an 
attractive form a large and comprehensive 
assortment of the finer varieties of staple and 
fancy groceries, choice garden grown teas, 
strictly pure spices and coffees, fruits, canned 
and bottled goods and every variety of culinary 
supplies pertaining to the grocery line. Mr. 
Brown has in successful operation one of 
Burn's Patent Coffee Roasters, the largest and 
most complete apparatus of the kind in East- 
ern Indiana, and transacts an extensive trade in 
roasting coffees for dealers, turning out on an 
average nearly five tons per month. Steam 
power is utilized in this department and the 
result is the most expeditious and satisfactory 
work. Mr. Brown commenced business in 
this city on his own account in 1S74 in a 
smaller building near his present quarters, but 
his rapidly increasing trade necessitated, four 
years later, his removal to more commodious 
quarters and he removed to the spacious 
apartments which he has since occupied. In 
the line of fine fancy imported and Ameri- 
can goods, his stock is as complete and 
varied as that of any in the large seaboard or 
lake cities, great care being exercised to pro- 
cure the best and most reliable brands. Mr. 
Brown is a native and lifelong resident of 
Indiana and was born in Union County in 
1845. He has resided in Richmond since 
1S66 and has been for more than 20 years 
engaged in the grocery business. Devoting 
his undivided personal attention to the man- 
agement of his extensive and popular house, 
he is ably assisted by a competent and effi- 
cient corps of salesmen and assistants, whose 
aim is ever to give the most unqualified satis- 
faction to patrons in quality, quantity and price. 



HAYNES, SPENCER & CO., 

Church, Hall, School and Office 
Furniture, Corner North E and 
Twelfth Sts. 

This enterprise was inaugurated in 1S7S, at 
which time a stock company was organized 
and incorporated under the laws of the state of 
Indiana, with an authorized capital of $75,000, 
which has lately been increased to $125,000, 
all paid in. The company occupy for manu- 
facturing purposes substantial brick buildings, 
with an aggregate floor space of more than 
113,000 square feet, which are equipped 
throughout with the mint approved de-igns 
and devices of labor saving machinery, pro- 
pelled by two steam engines and boilers, with 
a combined force equivalent to 130 horse 
power. An average force of 200 operatives, 
most of whom are skilled laborers, are em- 
ployed in the various departments, necessi- 
tating a weekly disbursement for the item of 
labor alone of more than $2,200. The pro- 
ducts of this company, which have acquired 
a world-wide reputation for their originality 
and beauty of design and reliability of work- 
manship, may be appropriately classified under 
their distinctive heads, the first embracing a 
great variety of 

CHURCH AND HALL FURNITURE, 

including chaste and elegant designs of pul- 
pits, pews, lecturns, chairs, settees, railings, 




panel work, etc., from the most beautiful orna- 
mental woods and in a great variety of pat- 
terns and styles. The company has already 
furnished more than 300 church edifices ir» 
nearly every state of the Union and in the 
District of Columbia, many of which are the 
property of the wealthiest and most aristo- 
cratic congregations in the principal cities 
East and West, North and South. They also 
make a specialty of manufacturing every 
variety of hall, opera house, library, depot, 
bank and court house furniture, tables, book- 
cases, judges' stands, bank counters and fit- 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 



tings, both from original designs and furnished 
drawings. Among the special rarieties and 
designs of 

SCHOOL FLRNITURE 

•may be especially mentioned the "Advance," 




•with all the latest "improvements attached, 
solid curved back and seat, unexcelled for 
comfort and durability, with folding seat 
mounted on the universal screw hinge and 
supplied with special steel spring, the 
"Star" desk, without doubt the finest wood 
desk in the market, recitation seats on iron 
standards, teachers' desks in a variety ot plain 
and ornamental styles, principals', trustees' 
and superintendents' desks, teachers' and prin- 
cipals' chairs, etc. 

OFFICE FURNITURE. 

This is also the headquarters of the Wooton 
Desk Manufacturing Company, manufactur- 




mm 



■ar-gz* 



«rs of the world renowned Wooton Patent 
Cabinet Office Secretaries and Rotary Desks, 
-which are emphatically the most comprehen- 
sive and complete office appliance in the 



world and far excellence "the desk of the age/* 
These beautiful and convenient desks were 
patented and introduced to the public in 1874 
and since that time have found their wav into 
all parts of the civilized globe. Their merits 
are too well known to require 
extended comment at our hands. 
They have already attained a 
large sale in Great Bri'ain, France 
and Germany and orders have 
been filled by this corn pan v for 
them from South America, Mexi- 
co, China, Japan, India, Egypt, 
Turkey, Australia and other re- 
mote sections of the earth where 
civilization has acquired a foot- 
hold. These desks are manufac- 
tured in a variety of sizes, forms 
and styles and recent important 
improvements have added mate- 
rially to their utility and conveni- 
ence. Illustrated catalogues pub- 
lished by this company * are 
furnished gratuitously upon ap- 
plication and will be found to 
convey full and important infor- 
mation to those desiring the most 
serviceable elegant and conveni- 
ent desk in the world. The 
various products of this repre- 
sentative company are all made 
from the best material, thoroughly seasoned, 
elaborately finished in the highest'stvle of art 
and are guaranteed to be exactly as repre- 
sented, even to the most minute detail. This 
is among the largest and most thoroughly 
equipped establishments of its class in the 
United States, and in their specialties of church 
and office furniture the most extensive and 
complete in the world. The products c: the 
company are shipped direct from the factorv to 
every section of the United States and Terri- 
tories, the British possessions, and, in fact, to 
all sections of the world, their annual transac- 
tions closely approximating $300,000. The 
officers of the company as at present organ- 
ized are T. W. Haynes, President; Charles H. 
Coffin, Vice President, and \V. F. Spencer, 
Secretary and Treasurer. 



IRVIN REED & SONS, 

General Hardware, Nos. 631 and 633 
Main St. 

Among the most favorably known houses 
of Richmond extensively engaged in this im- 
portant department of trade is that of Me-srs. 
Irvin Reed & Sons, where may constant; v be 
found a full and comprehensive assortment or 
heavy and shelf hardware, nails, glass, puttv, 
cutlerv, agricultural tools and implements, 
carpenters and mechanics' supplies and the 
great variety of miscellaneous articles legiti- 
mately pertaining to this branch of trade. 
The trade of this house is derived from the 
city and surrounding territory and reaches 
annually the aggregate of more than $100,000- 
The senior member of this representative r.rm. 



22 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



Mr. Irvin Reed, is one of our oldest and most 
enterprising pioneer citizens. He was born at 
Zanesville, O., in 1S10 and came to this 
county when but a young man and has been 
prominently identified with the mercantile 
interests of Richmond for a period of more 
than half a century, having first established 
himself in the drug and book, business in this 
place in 1833 — the first house of its class in 
Wayne County. In 1S56 he laid the founda- 
tion of his present house on the same thor- 
oughfare where it is now established, and upon 
a comparatively small scale. In 1S76 he ad- 
mitted his two sons to an interest in the house. 
Mr. Reed, Sr., has been intimately associated 
with the development of the city's trade and 
growth from its infancy and has been an active 
and influential promoter of many of its most 
important enterprises. He was for several 
years a member of the Town Council prior to 
the adoption of a city charter and was one of 
the originators and most zealous advocates of 
the establishment of a municipal form of gov- 
ernment. He aided by his influence and 
means in projecting and completing the Rich- 
mond & Ft. Wayne Railroad and numerous 
other public enterprises. Messrs. Charles and 
Frank Reed, the junior members of the firm, 
are natives and lifelong residents of Indiana. 
The first named was born in 1S50 and the 
latter in 1S54. They have infused new energy 
and enterprise into the business of this old 
established house, which to-day ranks second 
to none in this line in this section of the state. 



WILLIAM T. DENNIS, 

Solicitor of Patents; Office, 404 

Main St. 
There are few men in civil life today more 
widely known in the state of Indiana in con- 
nection with its industrial and agricultural 
interests than Mr. William T. Dennis, solici- 
tor of patents, whose office is located at No. 
404 Main St., and it is equally true that there 
are none possessing a more thorough and 
intelligent conception of the peculiar workings 
of the patent office and the essential qualifi- 
cations of a successful solicitor and attorney 
in all matters pertaining to the modus operandi 
of securing for inventors their rights and 
privileges under the patent laws of the United 
States. Mr. Dennis has been identified with 
this special professional pursuit for more than 
a quarter of a century, during which period he 
has had occasion to procure from the govern- 
ment many important patents for inventors in 
this section and to prosecute claims of almost 
every description pertaining to patent rights, 
infringements, etc. He was for many years 
an examiner in the Patent Office at Washing- 
ton, D. C, in which responsible position he 
acquired a fund of useful and practical infor- 
mation, which has been of great benefit to 
him in the practice of his profession. He was 
the originator and projector of the first Board 
of Agriculture in the state and to him was 
given the almost exclusive charge of the first 
Agricultural Fair, which was held in the year 



1S52. For nine consecutive terms he occu- 
pied the responsible position of Secretary of 
that board, and upon him devolved the maiiin 
labors of organizing and conducting the affeare 
of that organization. He also setved for a 
considerable period as Chief Clerk in tine 
Department of Agriculture at Washington 
and was the first to introduce many importumt 
improvements in agricultural implements amid 
machinery in this state, notably the Empire 
Plow in 1S50, the first self raker and reaper en 
1S52, the first mowing machine in 1853 amid 
numerous other devices. About the year 
1852 he also introduced improved varieties of 
foreign and American blooded stock, including 
Morgan horses, French Merino sheep amd 
imported short-horns. During the war of the 
rebellion Mr. Dennis rendered most effective 
and valuable aid to the Union cause in fees 
private capacity and in his official position acs 
State Military Agent at Washington, D. €-„ 
which responsible post he held for four yeara, 
and to him the state is largely indebted for the 
effective care in securing the necessities amd 
comforts of the sick and wounded after fine 
battles. Mr. Dennis has not confined bits 
abilities exclusively to any single field «rf 
action, as his contributions to the press haie 
given him a more than local reputation as a 
profound thinker and an earnest and abfe 
writer, possessing literary attainments of & 
high order. 



MARCHANT & HAYNES, 

Manufacturers of Baking Powdeis 
and Dealers in Teas and Fine Ex- 
tracts, No. 1,031 Main St. 
Among the many varieties of baking pow- 
ders now before the public which hawe 
triumphantly stood the test of time and chemii- 
cal analysis and' received a verdict of unquali- 
fied approval from the better and monie 
intelligent class of housekeepers, the cele- 
brated 'White Lily" brand, manufactured few 
Messrs. Marchanl & Haynes, of Richmond, 
Ind., claims prominent recognition and conn- 
spicuous rank. This firm, which has now 
been in existence nearly 12 years, is the onlhy 
one in the city manufacturing baking powders, 
and as absolute purity has ever been the 
desideratum aimed at, in their production thnv 
have established a trade extending throughout 
Indiana, Ohio, Missouri. Kentucky,, Kansas, 
Illinois and other Western States and a repu- 
tation for their products not surpassed by amv 
similar establishment in the Union. In addi- 
tion to their extensive trade in this standard 
article of commerce, Messrs. Marchant ic 
Haynes are large jobbers and wholesale deal- 
ers in fine garden j;rown teas, representing in 
this city many of the most noted importers wf 
New York, Philadelphia, San Francisco ami 
other trade centers of the Union and transact- 
ing a business in this line far in excess of that 
of any contemporaneous house in Eastern 
Indiana. They al>o manufacture pure ex- 
tracts. They occupy for sales and manu- 
facturing purposes three entire floors at tie 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 



23 



location previouslj designated, each 20x50 
feet in dimensions, and transact an annual 
business of more than $50,000. Mr. Joseph 
Marchant is a native ot the old historic town 
of Nantucket, Mass., but has resided in Rich- 
mond for many years and been prominently 
identified with its commercial growth and 
prosperity. Upon him devolves the general 
management of the business in this city, his 
partner and associate in business, Mr. Ira 
Haynes, being at the present time a resident of 
Ohio, of which state he is also a native. 



u 



RICHMOND PLANING AND FLOOR- 
ING MILLS, 
. Russell, Manufacturer Frames, 
ouldings, & General House Work, 
Cor. 12TH St. and Railroad. 
One of the most efficiently conducted enter- 
prises of its class, worthy of special notice in 
a review of the progressive industries of this 
city and eastern Indiana, is the Richmond 
Planing and Flooring Mills, at present con- 
ducted by Mr. J. J. Russell and located at the 
corner of 12th street and railroad. This enter- 
prise had its origin with Messrs. Cary & Row- 
lett, who commenced business in a compara- 
tively small way in 1S67. The buildings then 
occupied were subsequently destroyed by fire, 
after which the operations were again estab- 
lished in the present location, where they con- 
tinued up to January 1SS4, at which time the 
entire machinery and good will of the estab- 
* lishment passed into the hands of its present 
proprietor. The premises occupied embrace 
a general manufacturing department 60x125 
feet, while upon the second floor the bench 
.work department embraces a room 30x60 feet 
with office at south end of main room, enjoy- 
ing telephonic communication with all adjoin- 
ing towns and cities. These works are supplied 
with the latest improved labor-saving machin- 
ery for the prompt and rapid execution of all 
description of frames, mouldings and general 
house work in this department, while contracts 
relating to supplies in this line, for carpenters, 
builders or dealers will be executed upon as 
liberal terms as any contemporaneous house I 
in eastern Indiana. All general job work in 
this line will also receive prompt attention. 
An average force of from S to 12 hands here 
find employment, and the facilities enjoyed by 
the Richmond Planing and Flooring Mills for 
meetiijg the requirements of our progressive 
future are not surpassed by any contempora- 
neous establishment in this section of the state. 
Mr. Russell, the proprietor of these mills, is a 
thorough mechanician and practical business 
man of long experience. He is a native of 
Chester County, Pa., where he was born in 
1831. He learned the trade of cabinet maker 
when quite a young man and for about two 
years held the position of foreman in one of 
the prominent manufacturing concerns of 
Philadelphia, in which employment was given 
to over So hands. He came west to this county- 
over 26 years ago, and has been identified with I 
its progressive industries chieflv, ever since. 



WILLIAM R. SWAN & CO., 

Pianos, Organs, Music and Musical 

Merchandise, 935 Main St. 
It may be safely asserted that in proportion 
to the growth of musical culture and the inter- 
est manifested in the introduction of musical 
instruments into the houses of any given com- 
munity, in that proportion is fixed* the standard 
of aesthetic taste, culture and refinement. In 
this connection the comparatively recent es- 
tablishment of the musical emporium of Wil- 
liam R. Swan & Co. in this city cannot fail to 
exercise an important influence, both in its 
commercial transactions and in the incentive 
to musical culture in this section of the state. 
This house was originally established in this 
city about the 1st of January of the present 
year and located at No. 710 Main St., but for 
the purpose of securing more ample space for 
storage and business purposes was removed 
February mth to their present elegant and 
spacious quarters, at No. 935 Main St. The 
premises occupied embrace a fine business 
room 2S.XS2 feet in dimensions, with basement 
of same size for general storage purposes, in- 
which is carried the largest stock of pianos, 
organs and general musical merchandise to be 
found in any other establishment in Eastern 
Indiana. The stock carried embraces the best 
makes of pianos and organs, a full stock of 
small musical instruments of every class and 
general music. il merchandise. All popular 
and newest sheet music received promptly on 
publication or furnished on short notice to 
order. This hou^e holds the general agency 
for the Mason & Hamlin organs and controls 
the retail trade of the Chase Piano Company, 
ot this city. They also handle the Sohmer 
and Haines pianos and the arrangements en- 
joyed with manufacturers enables them to 
supply any of the above instruments at lowest 
manufacturers' prices. The individual mem- 
bers of this firm are William R. Swan and 
Charles A. Daniell, both of whom have en- 
joyed years of experience in this department 
of trade and who e familiarity with musical 
instruments cannot fail to be of advantage to 
those desiring to make selections for home, 
church or hall purposes. Mr. Swan is a 
native of New York City and soon after com- 
pleting his literary education became identified 
with the music trade and was for a period of 
five years connected with the well known 
house of Brainard's Sons, ot Cleveland, O., 
previous to coming to this city. Mr. Daniell 
is a native of New York and has enjoyed both 
a liberal literary and musical education. For 
a period of 12 years he was associated with the 
house of John Church & Co , of Cincinnati, 
and has been for the past tour years the editor 
and publisher of The Musical People, the lead- 
ing tiade paper of this department, published 
at New York Cit*. Enjoying facilities in this 
department of trace unsurpassed by any con- 
temporaneous establishment in the West, this 
house cannot fail to attract to this city a trade 
which would otherwise have been diverted to 
other points, from the adjoining counties. 



24 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



CHAMPION ROLLER SKATE AND 
WAGON COMPANY, 
Office and Works, 1,122 North E St. 
The Champion Roller Skate and Wagon 
Company was incorporated under the laws of 
the state of Indiana, February 6th, 18S4, with 
a capital stock, of $15,000, with the following 
as the incorporators and Directors: Isaac 
Kinsey, C- W. Ferguson, J. V. Rowlett, J. F." 
Reeves and Burton C. Mitchell. At a subse- 
quent meeting of the Directors the following 
officers were elected: J. F. Reeves, President; 
Reuben Myrick, Secretary and J. V. Rowlett, 
Manager. The specialties manufactured em- 
brace a roller skate, possessing special features 
of excellence, on which one ot the members of 
this company secured letters patent from the 
United States Government, now controlled by 
this company. One or two points of superi- 
ority in this skate is worthy of special men- 
tion as commending it both to the trade and to 
the growing number of those who use this 
class of articles: It is more easily operated 
and simple and easy in its adjustment to the 
feet; it is not only more attractive in appear- 
ance but less likely to get out of order and 
consequently more durable. Possessing these 
advantages over any other roller skate now in 
the market, the products of this company can- 
not fail to elicit the attention of dealers in all 
sections of the Union. Another article of 
unlimited demand engaging the energies of 
this company is the manufacture of childrens' 
■wagons, carriages and buggies and baby vehi- 
cles, on which this company also control 
letters patent, giving to the vehicles manu- 
factured by them the strongest claim to public 
recognition and favor. These features of ex- 
cellence will appear self evident to all who 
inspect these products, and we need only to 
mention the points in which they exist, viz. : 
in the metal hub for wheel and in the attach- 
ment for running gear, securing easy running, 
a minimum of lightness with a maximum of 
strength and durability. They present to 
dealers one most desirable feature in, the ease 
with which they are adjusted for shipment 
•with perfect safety, and in the beauty of finish 
and attractive appearance will be recognized 
as securing the highest perfection yet attained 
in these articles, while the facilities enjoyed 
"by this company in tne production of these 
articles enables them to place them on the 
market at rates which will compare favorably 
•with those of any contemporaneous establish- 
ment in the Union. Employment is given in 
these works to a number of skilled artizans 
and the newest improved labor saving devices 
utilized tor the production of the specialties to 
which they are devoted, which cannot fail to 
elicit correspondence and suggest to dealers 
the propriety of establishing business relations 
with this company. Mr. J. V. Rowlett, the 
manager and patentee of the devices pertaining 
to these articles, is a native of this city and 
has enjoyed a long business experience in 
association >ith its business and commercial 
interests, '/e possesses inventive genius of a 



in <»i 

I 



high order, embracing that peculiar quality of 
adapting his devices to the practical require- 
ments of the times. 



B. C. HILL, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 
All Kinds of Grain, Haxall Flour, 
Mill Feed, Baled Hay and Straw, 
No. 1.014 Main St. 
Mr. B. C. Hill began business as a dealer in 
grain at his present location in 1S71, and dur- 
ing the intervening period has become widely 
and favorably known throughout this section 
of the state. He occupies a storeroom 25x160 
feet in size, in which he carries a large stock of 
grain, flour, mill feed, baled hay and straw. 
He handles large amounts of the'se commodi- 
ties and transacts a yearly business of $25,000. 
He employs two assistants and his trade, which 
is principally local, will compare favorably 
with that of any other of the kind in the city, 
as the above figures will show. Mr. Hill is a 
native of Randolph County, N. C., and has 
been a resident of this city for the past 13 
years. He devotes his entire time and atten- 
tion to the interests of his business, is a 
prompt, reliable and energetic business man 
and has risen to his present prominence in the 
business community through his own unaided 
efforts. 



JAMES J. VARLEY, 

Grocer and Dealer in Country Pro- 
duce, Fruit and Vegetables, Nos. 197 < 
Ft. Wayne Ave. and 412 N. Eighth St. 
Prominent among the leading business 
houses of Richmond engaged in the grocery 
trade is that of Mr. James J. Varley, located at 
Nos. 197 Ft. Wayne Ave. and 412 North 
Eighth St. Mr. Varley established himself at 
the above named location over two years ago, 
succeeding Mr. George B. Dugan, and under 
his efficient management the business trans- 
actions of this house have had a gradual 
growth with each succeeding year. He occu- 
py s a substantial three story brick building, 
20x80 feet in dimensions, the upper portion 
being used as a residence, and carries a large 
stock, valued at about $5,000, consisting of 
choice staple and fancy family groceries and 
provisions, canned goods, flour, sugars, spices, 
teas, coffees, smoked and dried meats, fish, 
fruits, nuts and confectioneries, tobaccos, 
cigars, notions, etc. Employment is given to 
an average of five assistants and a delivery 
wagon for the prompt delivery of goods to 
patrons in all parts of the city, the annual 
transactions reaching about $31,000, with a 
trade extending throughout this city and 
surrounding country and embracing largely 
the better class of citizens. Mr. Varley is a 
native of New York State, where he was born 
in 1S55, but came to this city when a mere 
child, where he has resided for the past 22 
years. Possessing the fullest advantages in 
securing his supplies from producers and the 
best jobbing houses, this house is able to com- 
pete with any of its contemporaries. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 



25 



GEORGE H. KNOLLENBERG, 

Dry Goods, Nos. 809 and 811 Main St. 
Probably in the history of the representa- 
tive merchants and self made men of Rich- 
mond, no more worthy example can be found 
of what may be accomplished by energy, in- 
tegrity and "well directed effort than is so 
strikingly exemplified in the successful career 
of Mr. George H. Knollenberg, to whom may 
be appropriately applied the title of the "Dry 
Goods King of Eastern Indiana." Mr. Knol- 
lenberg in 1866, two years before attaining his 
majority, embarked in the dry goods trade in 




pEPiffifcSr 



pail lyj-.g 




an unpretentions one story frame structure, 
18x24 feet in size . which occupied at that time 
a portion of the site whereon now stands his 
palatial and magnificent temple of trade. His 
stock was necessarily limited and himself and 
one assistant constituted the entire force re- 
quired during the earlier days of his business 
career. Strict application to his business, 
untiring devotion to the wants and require- 
ments of his patrons, aconscientious adherence 
to the principles of mercantile honor and 
integrity, together with a determination to win 
a prominent rank among his contemporaries, 
ensured for him from the very inception of his 
enterprise the confidence of* the community, 
and each succeeding year witnessed a stead v 
growth of trade and a corresponding increase 



in the scope of his operations, necessitating 
removal to more commodious quarters. He 
accordingly leased an adjacent apartment, 
where the business was continued until 1S77, 
when he erected the commodious and elegant 
structure which he now occupies and which U 
at once an ornament to the city and an enduring 
monument to the sagacity and energy of its 
enterprising proprietor. The building, which 
was designed and erected expressly for his 
occupancy, is 36x90 feet in dimensions, the 
side and back walls being substantially con- 
structed of brick, while the front, composed of 
iron, stone and plate glass, is one of the finest 
in the city. The interior arrangements are 
upon a scale of magnificence and refined taste 
corresponding to the imposing/acade and all im- 
provements of modern metropolitan establish- 
ments of this class have been brought into 
requisition to facilitate the transaction of busi- 
ness and the convenience of customers. Mr. 
Knollenberg carries a full line of foreign and 
American dry goods, dress fabrics, domestics, 
white goods, woolens, notions, fancy goods 
and miscellaneous merchandise pertaining to 
this special branch of trade. From 35 to 40 
salesmen and assistants are employed in the 
dry goods house and the annual transactions 
of this representative hive of industry and 
trade will reach $200,000. Mr. George H. 
Knollenberg is a native and lifelong resident 
of Richmond and was born December 7th, 
1S47. Previous to embarking in his present 
enterprise he was employed for three years as 
salesman with the house of Emswiler & 
Crocker, and although yet a voting man, he 
has had an experience of more" than 20 years 
in this special branch of commercial industry. 

THOMPSON & GOOD, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
Wool, Seeds and Groceries, S22 and 
S24 Main St. 
This house dates its origin to 1S7S, at which 
time it was established by Messrs. Benjaman 
& Weaver, who were succeeded bv Mr. C. B. 
Hunt, but shortly afterward the business re- 
verted to the original proprietors, who con- 
ducted it up to November, 1SS2, at which time 
it came into the hands of the present proprie- 
tors. The best class of goods are purchased 
from first hands and a steady and liberal in- 
crease in their annual transactions has resulted, 
until to-day they enjoy, confessedly, the lead- 
ing position in the retail grocery and provision 
trade. As an indication of its growing opera- 
tions, it should be noticed that the annual 
transactions of the house, previous to comino- 
into their control, in no year exceeded $48,000) 
while the present annual transactions will 
reach $70,000. The premises occupied em- 
brace one of the largest as well as one of the 
most elegantly finished and furnished business 
structures in" the state. The main business 
room is 36x152 feet in dimensions, the lofty 
ceiling being supported in the center bv iron 
columns, while it is safe to say that no "estab- 
lishment in this department "of trade in our 



26 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



metropolitan cities can exhibit a higher excel- 
lence and adaptation to the necessities and 
conveniences than is exhibited in the devices 
and furnishings here employed, for taste, 
cleanliness and order. The cash desk occu- 
pies a central position, and like the general 
finish of the room, is finished in black walnut, 
while in the rear is a neatly furnished ladies' 
waiting room, with toilet conveniences, and 
an additional brick building in the rear 
is used for the preservation and storage of 
smoked meats. While the stocks carried em- 
brace everv description of goods pertaining to 
home supplies in this department, carrying 
the largest stocks of any house in this city, a 
specialty is made of goods at wholesale prices, 
in sugar by the barrel, coffee by the bag and 
canned goods by the dozen. In their city 
trade they employ two wagons for the prompt 
delivery of goods to patrons in all parts of the 
city. They also deal largely in wool and seeds 
in their season. The annual transactions in 
wool alone have reached as high as $20,000, 
while in clover, timothy and other varieties of 
field seeds a larger business is done than by 
any other house in Eastern Indiana or West- 
ern Ohio. An average force of from six to 
ten assistants here find employment, while the 
trade embraces both city and country within a 
radius of 30 miles, with trade relations extend- 
ing also into the adjoining counties of Eastern 
Indiana and Western Ohio. The individual 
members of this firm are William M. Thomp- 
son and Lawrence P. Good, both of whom are 
natives of this county and enjoy a wide and 
favorable acquaintance in social, political and 
business circles. As an indication of popular 
favor, it may be mentioned that for two terms 
Mr. Thompson was called upon to fill the 
responsible position of Treasurer of this county, 
the duties of which were performed with credit 
and fidelity. 

ADAM H. BARTEL & CO., 

Wholesale Notions, Fancy Goods, 
etc., No. 210 Fort Wayne Ave. 
One of the leading houses of Richmond 
transacting an exclusively wholesale business 
in notions, fancy goods, small wares and simi- 
lar articles is that of Messrs. Adam H. Bartel 
& Co., located at No. 210 Fort Wayne Ave., 
where two entire floors, each 20x120 feet in 
dimensions, are stocked to their utmost stor- 
age capacity with a large and carefully selected 
assortment of imported and American fancy 
goods, ornaments, toys, notions, etc., which 
for variety, extent and general completeness 
will bear favorable comparison with those of 
similar establishments in the great cities of 
the Union. Purchasing directly from inport- 
ers and manufacturers, this house is prepared 
to duplicate the invoices of New York or 
Philadelphia jobbers, and taking into consid- 
eration the saving in freight charges, it will be 
found that merchants in the interior towns of 
Eastern Indiana and Western Ohio can pro- 
cure their supplies at this house upon more 
advantageous terms and at lower prices than 



from the seaboard cities and equally as well zs- 
at any Western metropolis. This representa- 
tive establishment had its inception in 1S77, 
when it was founded by Bartel & Schaefer 
and then located at No. 243 Main St. In 1S79, 
the partnership was dissolved and Mr. Bartel 
removed to the present location, where subse- 
quently the present firm was formed, the 
individual members of which are Adam H- 
Bartel, John M. Coate and John R. Hawkotte. 
The trade of the house is derived principallv 
from Eastern Indiana and Western Ohio,, 
within a radius of 100 miles in each direction, 
and the annual sales have increased more than 
fourfold during the past four years under the 
energetic, liberal and enterp'rising manage- 
ment of Mr. Bartel and his progressive busi- 
ness associates. Mr. Bartel is a native of 
Germany but has been a resident of this city 
for the past 29 years, during the greater por- 
tion of which time he has devoted his attention 
exclusively to this special department of com- 
mercial enterprise, with all the details of which 
he is thoroughly conversant. Mr. John M. 
Coate is a native of Miami County, O., where- 
he was born in 1S5S. He was raised and edu- 
cated in this county. Since quite a young- 
man he has been identified with commercial 
pursuits and as an employe and partner has 
been associated with this house for over four 
years. Mr. Hawkotte is a native of Cincin- 
nati, O. He was for some time in the employ 
of George H. Knollenberg, subsequently in 
mercantile business on his own account, pre- 
vious to becoming identified with this house,, 
where he was employed as salesman for one 
year, after which he was admitted as a partner. 



POGUE & MILLER, 

Wholesale Hardware, Nos. 900 and 

902 Main St. 
Among the largest and most thoroughly 
stocked establishments in the Eastern portion, 
of the state engaged in the hardware trade, 
is that of Messrs. Pogue & Miller, which 
although founded as recently as 1S81, has 
already acquired an enviable reputation and a 
trade which will compare favorably with that 
of any of its contemporaries. The present 
house was founded in March, 1S81, by Mr. 
Charles H. Pogue, and in June of the same 
year Mr. George W. Miller was admitted as a 
partner. The salesroom, one of the finest in 
the city, occupies a ground space of 50x1150 
feet. The stock is complete in everv depart- 
ment and embraces a full and comprehensive 
assortment of every description of heavy and 
shelf hardware, mechanics' tools/nails, glass, 
builders ( materials, etc. Within the compara- 
tively brief period of its existence, this firm 
has established a trade extending over a 
wide area of territory, embracing this and ad- 
joining states, and amounting to not less than 
$100,000 per annum, with every prospect for 
a steady and gratifying increase. Mr. Charles 
H. Pogue is a native of Woodford Countv, . 
111., and Mr. George W. Miller of Norwalk. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 



27 



Conn. They have both been identified with 
the hardware trade for many years previous 
to the formation of the present partnership. 



RICHMOND MACHINE WORKS, 

Steam Engines, Saw Mills, etc., 
North of Railroad Depot. 
Keeping pace with the progressive spirit of 
the age and with all the modern improve- 
ments in stationary and portable engines, saw 
mills, etc., and adding also to their products 
many valuable and important improvements 
of their own, which actual tests and practical 
experience have demonstrated to possess true 
merit, the Richmond Machine Works claim 
prominent recognition as among the most im- 
portant industrial enterprises of the state. 



ances employed in the various . departments 
are of the most approved construction and 
design, especially adapted to the purposes for 
which they are employed, the motive power 
for which is supplied by one 60 horse power 
engine and boiler. The annual transactions of 
the company are at the present time in exce-s 
of $100,000". The rapid growth and wide- 
spread reputation acquired by this companr 
during the past decade has been d„e to the 
fact that in the construction of portable ar.i 
stationary engines, saw mills, and other special 
machinery, they have embodied every im- 
provement which practical knowledge ard 
long experience have proved to be oi value in 
adaptation to the purposes for which they are 
designed. Objections hitherto existing have 




These works were originally established in 
1S60 upon a comparatively small scale and for 
the first few years of their existence their 
operations were necessarily limited. The 
popularity of their special products and the 
increased demand therefor soon rendered 
necessary increased facilities, and in 1S72 the 
present company was organized and incor- 
porated under the laws of the state of Indiana, 
with a capital stock of $100,000. Since that 
time the dividends or surplus earnings of the 
company have been permitted to accumulate 
and have been added to the working capital, 
which is at the present time fully double the 
original amount. For the purpose of syste- 
matizing the operations of the company, the 
business is conducted under three distinct sub- 
divisions, viz., the machinery, the foundry 
and the wood working departments, each 
under the immediate supervision of experi- 
enced foremen. The machinery and appli- 



been as far as possible obviated and improve- 
ments introduced based on scientific princi- 
ples, many of which to be found in no other 
machines" in use, have been the invention of 
Mr. B. P. Perry, the ingenious and efficient 
President of the company. Worthy of spe- 
cial mention in this connection are the cele 
brated center crank engines, manufactured 
here. These engines are peculiarly adapted to 
saw mills, planing mills, wood working estab- 
lishments, electric lights or any workreq.inr.g 
great speed, and for that purpose excel all 
others. The bed-plate, cylinder, steam chest, 
main boxes and heater are all one solid cast- 
ing, without joints. The cylinder having large 
bore, short stroke and broad bearings, can be 
run smoothly up to its greatest capacity. In 
the manufacture of portable and stationary 
engines this company has introJuced numer- 
ous important features, conspicuous among 
which may be mentioned the patent circular 



28 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



glide-valve, the advantages of which become 
apparent at sight to the practical and expert 
engineer. By its use is ensured a totar absence 
of the enormous pressure noticeable in the 
ordinary style and consequent saving of the 
friction caused by it; a celerity and quickness 
of movement which no other device gives. In- 
stead of requiring a large portion of the steam 
power in the boiler to move the valve, as in 
the old style, the valve is self moving, the 
shape of the grooves being such that the 
instant the steam is admitted it mcves itself, 
the eccentric simply starting, regulating and 
checking it In this valve the arrangement 
for cut-off expansion of the steam while work- 
ing In the cylinder and releasing are so per- 
fect that all the force of the steam in the 
boiler is reserved for labor or duty, the valve 
still forming a direct tube from the boiler to 
the head of the piston in the cylinder, capable 
of being instantaneously shifted many times a 
minute to the other side without any waste of 
power. The induction parts are entirely inde- 
pendent from the exhaust and the area less 
than one-half the size, so that eaftr utilizing 
all of the steam it is freely liberated without 
the excessive back pressure consequent upon all 
engines exhausting through their receiving 
parts, so plainly demonstrated by the loud and 
labored exhaust on slide valve engines. In the 
production of saw mills, these works have also 
attained the highest degree of perfection, and 
in this special department of mechanical pro- 
duct their greatest growth has been developed. 
They manufacture eight different styles and 
sizes, ranging from the small power mill re- 
quiring but eight or ten horse power to the 
ponderous mill requiring 150 horse power, 
with capacity for sending its saw with light- 
ning speed through lumber sic or seven feet 
in diameter. These mammoth mills are fre- 
quently used on the Pacific Coast, and some 
which" have been manufactured here have 
developed a capacity lor sawing 80.000 feet in 
a single day. These works also make a spe- 
cialty of manufacturing boilers from the best 
quality of C. H. No. 1 Charcoal iron, upright 
portable engines, steam jet pumps, lime ex- 
tractors and heaters, patent sawdust grate bars, 
improved automatic mill dogs, patent saw 
swages, head blocks, carriages and mill ma- 
chinery and supplies generally. They also 
furnish the best qualities of leather and gum 
belting at manufacturers' prices, as well as 
wrought iron pipe fittings and brass work of 
every description. The foundry department is 
thoroughly equipped, embracing a large assort- 
ment of patterns, and the most perfect facili- 
ties are enjoyed for turning out every variety 
of light and heavy castings for any desired 
purpose. The officers of the company as at 
present organized are B. P. Perry, President, 
and L. H. Bunyan, Secretary, under whose 
judicious and effective management the works 
have attained their present magnitude and 
efficiency, entitling them to a high rank 
among the best of this class in the Union. 



QUAKER CITY ICE COMPANY, 

Brannon & Hawkins, Propr.'s, t*o. 
272 Ft. Wayne Ave. 
The leading house in the city of Richmewid 
engaged in this department of trade is firaat 
of Brannon & Hawkins, who under the desig- 
nating title of the "Quaker City Ice Cotm- 
pany" are putting up and delivering to city 
customers or wholesale purchasers a superior 
quality of pure spring water ice. The ice ILar- 
vested by this firm is procured from their own 
lakes, two in number, known respectively as 
the "Glen Miller" and the "Thistlethwiit:e" 
lakes, located a few miles from the city lismits 
and covering an aggregate space of about feve 
acres, while their ice houses have a capic :ty 
for holding 8,000 tons. During the winter or 
ice harvesting season about 30 hands are em- 
ployed, while in the summer four wagons sire 
constantly used for delivery purposes in tlhe 
city and from eight to ten assistants are erm- 
ployed. This business was originally estab- 
lished by the present senior member of tihe 
firm in 1S64 and conducted by him until 18*69, 
when Mr. D. Hawkins was admitted ta an 
interest in the business. Mr. \V. J. Brannion 
is a native of Ohio and was born February 
22d, 1S30. He is, however, an old resident of 
Richmond and has been for many years en- 
gaged in active business life. His business 
associate, Mr. D. Hawkins, was born in Rich- 
mond in 1S39 and enjoys a wide circife of 
acquaintances in his native city and adjacent 
towns in this section. As a representative 
firm in this special branch of trade, Messrs. 
Brannon & Hawkins enjoy the fullest comfi- 
dence of the community in which they have 
been so long recognized as honorable a'raf re- 
liable citizens and established a thriving amd 
prosperous business. 



E. F. ROSA, 

Manufacturer and Dealer in Min- 
eral Waters and Bottler of Ao.e, 
Beer, Porter and Cider, 437 Squcth 
Fourth St. 
This well known manufactory was origi- 
nally established by the father of the prestent 
proprietor, Mr. H. W. Rosa, in 1849, ora a 
small scale, near the race, close by where the 
Chase Piano Company are now locorted. 
Here he continued for a period of about tfbur 
years, when he removed to where the busi- 
ness is at present located. In 1S57 Mr. E. F. 
Rosa, his son, was admitted as a partner ;and 
the firm name became H. W. Rosa & Son, 
which continued without interruption until 
1S77, when Mr. H. W. Rosa retired, leaving 
the business under the management of his 
son, where it at present remains. The premi- 
ses occupied consist of two floors and a I irge 
basement, in a fine two story brick buiMiing, 
SSxiSo feet in size, thoroughly equipped with 
all the latest improved machinery and appli- 
ances for the prosecution of the busrness. 
Five assistants are regularly employed amd a 
large and extensive trade is done throughout 
the city and adjacent country. In addition to 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 



the manufacture of soda and mineral waters, 
Mr Rosa is also a bottler of ale, porter, beer 
and cider and sole agent in this city for the 
celebrated Western Brewery beer. He ddes 
the largest amount of business of this kind in 
the city, his sales not falling far short of 
$30,000 per annum. Mr. Rosa was born in 
Germany on the 13th day of May, 1S37, but 
ha* resided in America all his life, coming 
to this country with his parents when but five 
months old. He is an enterprising, public 
spirited citizen and has served the city in the 
Council for a continuous period of 12 years, 
having been first elected in 1873 and re-elected 
five times, thus showing the estimation in 
which he is held. 



W. W. ALEXANDER, 

Manufacturer of Galvanized Iron 
Cornice, Window Caps, Brackets, 
Etc. Roofing of all Kinds, No. 185 
Ft. Wayne Avenue. 
The establishment of Mr. W. W. Alexander 
is the olde>t and best equipped house of the 
kind in Wayne County, having been first 
started more* than 20 years ago by Messrs. 
Ward & Nye, who were succeeded by Ezra 
Nye & Bro. The firm next became Ezra Nye 
& Starr, followed soon after by Nye & Alex- 
■ ander, and Mr. Nye retiring in January, iSSo, 
Mr. Alexander became the sole proprietor, and 
has continued the bush ess alone ever since. 
The building occupied is a two story brick 
structure, 30x100 feet in size, and is very thor- 
oughly equipped with all the latest and best 
machinery and appliances for the manufacture 
of galvanized iron cornice, window caps, brack- 
ets, etc. 12 experienced hands are regularly 
employed, and all kinds of slate, tin and iron 
roofing is done to order. Mr. Alexander is 
also the agent for C. B. Evan's Mantle and 
Grate Company of Cincinnati, O , manufactu- 
rers of marbleized slate and iron mantels and 
combination mantels and grates. He also 
makes a specialty of hot air furnaces, placing 
them in position and guaranteeing satisfaction. 
The trade of the house extends to all parts of 
Indiana, Ohio and Illinois, and amounts to 
about $35,000 per annum. The facilities en- 
joyed by this house for promptly executing all 
contracts in this department are not surpassed 
by any contemporaneous establishment in the 
state. Telephonic communications with all 
adjacent cities. Mr. W. W. Alexander is a 
native of Ohio, where he was born in 1S43. 
He has been a resident of Indiana for the past 
20 years, and upon the breaking out of the Re- 
bellion he was among the very first to respond 
to the call of President Lincoln for three 
months' volunteers, enlisting as he did on the 
13th of April, 1S61, in the 20th O. V. I. At 
the expiration of this term of service he imme- 
diately re-enlisted for the period of three years, 
and was honorably discharged in 1S64, after 
participating In many of the prominent battles 
of the war, among which were the capture of 
" Fort Donaldson." " Pittsburgh Landing," 
"Shiloh " " Atlanta," " Little Rock" and many- 



others of lesser note. He is a practical tin- 
smith, and after the war, came to this city 
where he was in the employ of other parties 
up to the time of commencing business on his 
own account. 



WM.J. BENNERS & SONS, 

Hard Wood Lumber, 1023 North 

East St. 
The advantageous location of the city of 
Richmond, in regard to the hard wood lumber 
producing districts of Indiana and the great 
West together with the facilities enjoyed for 
producing the best varieties of walnut, ash, 
oak, cherry, hickory, poplar and other orna- 
mental woods indigei ous to this section of 
the union, have attracted the attention of man- 
ufacturers and large dealers from the east and 
led to the transaction of an important and 
growing trade in these special articles of com- 
merce. In 1S7S the extensive house of Wm. 
Benners & Sons, whose head-quarters are lo- 
cated on 30th Street, below Market, Philadel- 
phia, established a branch office in this city at 
No. 1023 North East St. for the purpose* of 
purchasing supplies of hard wood lumber and 
, forwarding the same to the main house in 
Philadelphia. This office is under the imme- 
diate charge and supervision of Mr. Joseph J. 
Cushman, who is prepared to purchase or con- 
tract for lumber of any of the above named 
varieties, paying the highest market rates 
therefor. Although the transactions at this 
office are confined almost exclusively to the 
shipment of lumber to Philadelphia its influ- 
ence upon the commercial thrift of the com- 
munity is and has been of a most pronounced 
and beneficial character, and as such, is enti- 
tled to rank among the prominent commercial 
establishments of our thriving municipality. 



EMIL MINCK'S BREWERY, 
Nos. in and 113 Main St. 
This brewery was erected by a Mr. Buhl 
about 40 years ago, during which time it has 
had several owners, Mr. Minck purchasing the 
property in 1S69 and making several valuable 
improvements, which have greatly enlarged 
its capacity and conveniences. Among these 
may be mentioned the large ice house of the 
establishment, 25x65 feet in dimensions and 
capable of holding 400 tons of ice The 
brewery proper is 45x75 feet, with large vaults 
for the storage of beer and furnished through- 
out with all the necessary appliances and 
equipments for conducting the business. In 
addition to those mentioned are numerous 
other buildings, stables, etc., including a sub- 
stantial brick dwelling, in which Mr. Minck 
and his son reside. The brewery is noted for 
the superior quality of the beer produced, the 
demand for which comes mostly from pri- 
vate families, on account of its well known 
purity and freedom from adulteration of every 
kind. It is the only brewery in the city and 
has a large and extensive trade. Three ex- 
perienced hands are kept employed through- 
out the entire year. Mr. Minck contemplates 



30 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



remodeling and rebuilding the establishment, 
so as to increase its producing capacity, and 
when these contemplated improvements are 
made the capacity of the brewery will be 3,000 
barrels. Mr. Minck was born in Germany in 
1832 and emigrated to this country in 1845. 
He is an experienced brewer, having learned 
the trade in the largest establishment in 
Columbus, O., and is ably assisted in the busi- 
ness by his son, Emil Minck, Jr., also an 
experienced and practical brewer and malt- 
ster. Under the continued successful man- 
agement of these gentlemen the brewery is 
destined to rank in the near future among the 
most celebrated establishments of the kind in 
this section. 



ECKEL & CO., 

Manufacturers of Long Eave Gut- 
ters, Main St. 

The improved eave gutters manu- 
factured by Mr. George Eckel & Co. 
possess numerous points of excel- 
lence and superiority which com- 
mend them to the favorable consid- 
eration of builders and property 
owners. These are the longes't 
vi hanging eave gutters manufactured, 
2" and being made from the best 
Z quality of leaded and bright plates 
2 in the most thorough style of work- 
s manship, are the most serviceable 
and desirable. They are formed in 
half circle and beaded on one side 
■j with five-eighth round bead closed 
p to body of trough, so that it can be 
c soldered as strength may require". 
Being made in lenghts of 56 inches 
without a seam, the many joints in 
ordinary styles are obviated, lessen- 
ing by 75 per cent the danger of 
breakage which invariably occurs 
first at the seams. The gutters are 
made in four, five and seven inch 
sizes, suitable for any kind of build- 
ing, and are carefully packed for 
shipment in uniform crates or boxes 
of 252 feet each, ready to be put to- 
gether in any desired length, which 
can be easily done by any practical tinsmith. 
Among the numerous advantages claimed for 
these gutters over any others now in use are 
that, being made from tin manufactured ex- 
pressly for this purpose, they possess extraor- 
dinary strength, make straighter and more 
satisfactory troughs, with less liability to break 
or leak than those made in the ordinary man- 
ner. As an evidence of the appreciation in 
which these improved gutters are held, it may 
be stated that in 18S3 over 350,000 feet were 
made and sold and the indications are that the 
sales for the current year will considerably 
exceed this amount. The demand is not only 
of a local character but extends to all sections 
of the United States, the methods adopted for 
shipment being such as to secure their trans- 
portation and delivery in good order at even 



the most remote points. These gutters are 
the invention of Mr. George Eckel, who has 
for some time been engaged in their manufac- 
ture. In January, iSSi, he disposed of his 
interest in the business to Mr. J. S. Zeller, who 
is now the sole manufacturer, under the firm 
name of Eckel & Co., to whom all orders 
should be addressed. Mr. Zeller is also iden- 
tified with the industrial interests of Richmond 
in other capacities, being at the present time a 
member of the firm of J. C. Albright & Co., a 
notice of which house will be found on an- 
other page. 

WARDER & STACE, 

Monuments and Tombstones, No. 1,121 
Main St. 

Of the various industrial enterprises of the 
present age requiring a high standard of artistic 
ability and skilled labor and one which, rising 
above the mere power of mechanical skill and 
verging into the artistic, is that of the manu- 
facture of monumental work and sculpture. 
The various cemeteries throughout the Union 
have become attractive to visitors by reason 
of the admirable taste displayed by our arti- 
zans in the chaste and elegant designs of their 
monuments and headstones, and those around 
Richmond will not suffer by comparison with 
those in other sections of the Union. One of 
the leading establishments of Eastern Indiana 
whose handiwork has largely contributed to 
the attractions of our "cities of the dead" is 
that of Messrs. Warder & Stace, whose office, 
studio and works are located at No. 1,121 
Main St., occupying an area of 20x120 feet, 
where are exhibited numerous fine specimens 
of monumental work in American and Scotch 
granite shafts, monuments and obelisks, tomb- 
stones in Vermont, Tennessee and Italian 
marble, urns, vases and sculptured designs, 
counter and furniture tops and a fine variety 
of the choicest and most desirable grades of 
granite and marble. This well known house 
was established by Mr.^Peter Ritter in 1866 
and two years later the firm name and style 
became Ritter & Vickery, by whom the busi- 
ness was continued until the death of the lat- 
ter, which occurred in 1S77. The following 
year Mr. Noah E. Warder, who had been for 
several years previously connected with the 
house in the capacity of salesman, became a 
partner, and the style became Ritter & War- 
der. The present partnership was formed in 
1SS1, and under the new administration the 
reputation acquired by the old house has been 
maintained and the scope of its operations 
been materially enlarged. Many of the finest 
specimens of monumental art in the ceme- 
teries of Eastern Indiana and Western Ohio 
have been designed and manufactured here, 
the prices ranging from $50 to $50x3. The 
firm has ample facilities and resources for the 
construction and erection of any style or size 
of monument or obelisk that may be required 
and are competent to successfully compete 
with any similar establishment East or West. 
They also deal extensively in the best varieties 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 



31 



of imported and American marbles, granites, 
etc- In the line of statuary and ornamental 
designs for cemeteries, parks, lawns, etc., they 
carry a desirable stock and exhibit some 
artistic views of fine work of their own design, 
as well as the most elaborate conceptions of 
American and foreign artists and sculptors. 
Mr. Noah E. Warder is a native of West Vir- 
ginia, in which state he was born in 1S36. He 
has been a resident of this city for the past 13 
years and during the greater portion of this 
time identified with the house of which he is 
now the senior member. Mr. Geering Stace 
was born in Ohio in 1S49 and came to Rich- 
mond in 1870. He is a practical designer and 
stone cutter, who has been engaged in this 
special department of industrial art for the 
past iS years, and upon him devolves the gen- 
eral supervis ; on of the artistic and mechanical 
departments. 



J. M. HUTTON be CO., 

Wood Burial Cases and Caskets, 
Cor. Twelfth and North E Sts. 
Among the diversified industrial pursuits 
■which have been inaugurated and pushed to 
an ultimate triumphant success in this city, no 
one is worthy of more conspicuous recogni- 
tion in the present review than the manufac- 
ture of coffins, caskets and burial cases upon 
an extensive scale, as conducted by the enter- 
prising firm of J. M. Hutton & Co., whose 
offices and works are located at the corner of 
Twelfth and North E Scs. and whose trade 
relations extends to all sections of the Union. 
The present extensive business had its incep- 
tion as early as 1866, having been inaugurated 
originally by Mr. Hutton as a manufactory for 
doors, sash, blinds, etc. Two years later,"per- 
ceiving with almost prophetic eye the immense 
field offered for establishing a central supply 
depot for undertakers' materials, from whence 
coffins, caskets and burial cases could be fur- 
nished at much lower rates than they could be 
made singly and by hand, and recognizing the 
advantageous location of Richmond with 
reference to its proximity to the lumber pro- 
ducing regions and its facilities for intercom- 
munication and cheap transportation to all 
sections of the republic, it was resolved to 
abandon the above named branches of industry 
and engage exclusively in the manufacture of 
coffins for the trade." The most gratifying 
•degree of success attended this new departure, 
and in 1S70, more extended facilities being 
demanded for their steadily increasing trade, a 
stock company was formed. The original 
capital stock of $100,000 was subsequently in- 
creased to $200,000, of which amount $160,- 
000 is now paid in and employed in the 
operations of the company. The original 
building, erected in 1S66 "at the corner of 
Twelfth and North E Sts., was three stories 
in height and 45x105 feet in size. To this 
additions have been made at different times, 
giving an increased area of floor space of more 
than 10,000 square feet, and other buildings 
have also been erected, including two sub- 



stantial four story brick structure*, each 
25x100 feet in dimensions, one four story 
brick building 50x65 feet in size and another 
four story building 50x50 feet. The office, 
trimming and shipping departments occupy 
a two story building iSxSo feet in dimensions. 
The manufacturing department is equipped 
throughout with the most approved styles of 
labor saving machinery, propelled by one 60 
horse power engine and boiler, and erery 
branch of the business is systematized and 
conducted upon the most economical prir.ci- 
ciples. An average force of no skilled 
mechanics are employed in the various depart- 
ments and the pay roll amounts to more than 
$4,000 per month. The material used :u the 
manufacture of coffins is the best obtainable 
and more than 2,000,000 feet of lumber are 
annually consumed, while an equal amount is 
kept constantly on hand in their yards or 
undergoing the requisite seasoning process 
preparatory to its use, and the annual capacity 
of the works is not less than 50,000 corr.ns or 
caskets. From 10,000 to 12,000 finished cof- 
fins are kept constantly in stock, embracingan 
almost endless variety of styles and patterns, 
from the plainest of ordinary wood coffins to 
the most elegant and elaborately trimmed 
cloth covered caskets. The company also 
carries in stock complete and comprehensive 
lines of undertakers' hardware, trimmings and 
supplies, which they offer to the trade at 
manufacturers' prices. The annual transac- 
tions of the company at the present time 
exceed $250,000 and the demand for their pro- 
ducts extends to all sections of the Union. 
This is the largest establishment of its class in 
Indiana and ranks second to none in th# 
United States in the thorough and compVte 
equipment of its works and the variety and 
reliability of its products. The officers of the 
company as at present organized are J. M. 
Hutton," President; M. H. Dill, Secretary, and 
W. P. Hutton, Treasurer. Mr. J. M. Hutton 
is a native of Maryland but has resided in 
Richmond since 1S36. He has been curing 
the greater portion of this time prominently 
identified with the industrial interests of the 
city. As the projector also of the exten- 
sive works with which he is now actively 
associated, he has accomplished much in the 
development and growth of our inland city 
and the success of one of its most important 
industries. Mr. M. H. Dill is a native and 
lifelong resident of Wayne County and has 
resided in Richmond for the past 30 years. 
Previous to accepting his present position he 
was engaged in the undertaking business, with 
all the details of which he is thoroughly and 
practically conversant. Mr. William P. Hut- 
ton, also a native of this county, has occupied 
the responsible position of Treasurer of the 
company since its organization, an office for 
which by education and the possession l :' rare 
executive and administrative abilities he is 
eminently qualified. This important industry 
has not only proved a gratifying financial suc- 
cess but has also been of incalculable benefit 



32 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



to the city and state as an Important factor of 
its commercial and manufacturing resources. 

SEDGWICK BROS., 

Wire Net Work Fences and Gates, 
No. 1517 North F St. 
Woven wire net possesses greater advanta- 
ges than anything else in use as a material for 
fences and gates. The only objection hitherto 
urged against the use of this style of fence has 
" been the ex- 













- ;>- > ... 



pense of man- 
ufacturing by 
hand. This 
objection has 
been obviated 
to a great ex- 
tent by the en- 
terprising firm 
of Sedgwick 
Bros., of Rich- 
mond, which 
has in success- 
ful operation 
at their exten- 
sive works in 
this city spe- 
cial machin- 
ery for the pro- 
duction of a 
superior qual- 
ity of wire net, 
the invention 
of Mr. Isham 
Sedgwick, a 
member of the 
firm, and in 
use at no other 
establshme n t 
in the world. 
By means of 
this machin- 
ery, wire of 
any desirable 
size can be rapidly woven into a double twist 
net work of diamond shaped mesh, which is 
conceded by experts and scientists to be the 
most desirable and economical manner in 
which steel or iron can be utilized to insure 
the greatest strength and durability. The 
Sedgwick steel wire fence is also highly orna- 
mented and is especially desirable for enclos- 
ing public or private parks, lawns, cemeteries, 
gardens, farm yards, etc., while for ordinary 
farm purposes it has no equal. The wire used 
is of the best annealed steel, either galvanized 
or painted, as desired. For the latter variety 
a superior quality of rust proof paint is used, 
which is warranted to last for many years. 
This is also applied by a process peculiarly 
their own, immense rolls of the wire being 
lowered by pulleys into a large wooden tank 
containing the paint, through which it re- 
volves and becomes completely and thor- 
oughly covered. Owing to its peculiar 
construction upon scientific principles, this 
fence is not affected bv heat, cold or other cli- 



matic influences, allowing contraction and 
taking up expansion. By the use of the spe- 
cial machinery employed by this firm, the 
cost of construction has been greatly reduced 
and the best fence in the world has been 
placed within the reach of every farmer and 
property owner in the Union. This firm also 
make a specialty of manufacturing improved 
styles of garden, lawn, cemetery and automatic 
self-opening gates and also every variety of 
small mesh nettings for office railings and 
similar purposes. During the five years of its 
existence the business of this firm has in- 
creased more than six-fold, the annual trans- 
actions at the present time aggregating over 
$100,000, with a trade extending to all sections 
of the United States. An average force of 
25 skilled and experienced mechanics are 
regularly employed and the works have a 
daily capacity tor turning out 10,000 feet of the 
best quality of double twisted woven wire an- 
nealed steel fencing. Five looms are in con- 
stant use and the machinery employed is 
propelled by an improved 20 horse power 
oscillating engine, built expressly for this firm. 
Messrs. Sedgwick Bros, issue an elaborately 
illustrated descriptive catalogue and price list, 
which is furnished free upon application. The 
individual members are Richard and Isham 
Sedgwick. 



ELDORADO STEAM LAUNDRY AND 
BATH ROOMS, 

Theo. McClellan, Prop., No. 10 North 

Eighth St. 
To Mr. Theo. McClellan, the enterprising 
proprietor of the Eldorado Steam Laundry 
and Bath Rooms, must be accorded a con- 
spicuous position in the present work, as his 
is the only establishment of its class in the 
city or county. The premises occupied for 
laundry and bath purposes, at No. 10 North 
Eighth St., comprise two floors, each 1SXS5 
feet in dimensions, fitted up in the most ap- 
proved modern metropolitan style expressly 
for the purposes for which they are used. Six 
spacious and well arranged bath rooms are 
supplied with hot and cold water, for plunge 
and shower baths, and are kept at all times in 
the most perfect condition. The laundry 
department is furuished with improved appli- 
ances and machinery, operated by one steam 
engine and suitable boilers, and the facilities 
for the expeditious execution of all varieties of 
laundrv work are first class in every particu- 
lar. The collar and cuff machine, which is 
similar to those used in the celebrated Troy 
laundries, has a capacity of 50 dozen per hour 
and all work turned out at the establishment 
presents a beautiful appearance. Mr. McClel- 
lan devotes his personal attention to the man- 
agement of his establishment and employs 10 
assistants in the various departments. His 
trade is derived from the city and surrounding 
territory and amounts to not less than $6,000 
per annum. Mr. McClellan is a native of 
Preble County, O., but has resided in this 
state for the past seven years. He inaugurated 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 



his present successful enterprise in January, 
1880, and has reaped the reward of energy and 
faithful attention to his business in a satisfac- 
tory and steadily increasing trade with each 
succeeding year. 

HUNTINGTON HOUSE AND GRAND 
HOTEL, 
J. H. Philbrook, Prop., Main St. 
The community that appreciates and sup- 
ports a first class and well conducted hotel 
stamps that city as on the high road to solid 
and substantial prosperity and establishes for 
It a reputation for enterprise and thrift among 
the traveling public. 

THE HUNTINGTON* HOUSK, 

located at the corner of Main and Seventh 
Sts., claims prominent recognition among the 
leading first class hotels of the West and is 
an institution which in its management and 
appointments reflects credit upon the city. 
The "Huntington" was first opened to the 
public more than 30 years ago by Mr. Oren 
Huntington (from whom the house derived its 
name) and remained under his management 
and control until his death, which occurred in 
1879, when it was leased by Mr. Robert F. 
Jones. The house was at that time thoroughly 
renovated, modernized and refitted and its sub- 
sequent management has been such as to 
warrant the assertion that it stands second to 
none in the West as a desirable and well con- 
ducted hotel. The building, which is a fine 
four story brick structure 100x140 feet in 
dimensions, is centrally and eligibly located in 
the heart of the business portion of the city, 
with street cars passing its doors to all sections 
of the city and suburbs. On the first floor are 
the spacious and conveniently arranged offices, 
reading and writing rooms, with floors of 
ornamental mosaic tile, a commodious and 
well lighted dining room, with seating capacity 
for more than 150 guests at one time, large 
sample rooms for the use of commercial trav- 
elers, finely furnished parlors and reception 
rooms, also the kitchen and culinary depart- 
ments, which are presided over by an accom- 
plished cook and caterer. The remaining 
floors are devoted to guest chambers and 
sleeping apartments, 60 in number, single and 
en suite, well lighted and furnished with all 
the modern conveniences, including gas and 
water. The appointments of the Hunting- 
ton throughout are first class in every particu- 
lar; the cuisine is in charge of competent and 
experienced hands; the table is all that could 
be desired by the most fastidious and the office 
is presided over by courteous and genial gen- 
tlemen, who spare no pains or efforts to make 
pleasant and satisfactory the stay of transient 
guests or regular boarders. 

THE GRAND HOTEL, 

under the same control and management as 
the Huntington, is located on the same square, 
fronting on Main St., between Sixth and Sev- 
enth, and was formerly known as the "Githens 
House." It is also a fine four story brick 
building, 50x150 feet In size, and has recently 



received a thorough renovation, remodeling- 
and new furnishment to meet the require- 
ments of the better class of the traveling pub- 
lic which the Huntington had not the capacity 
to furnish. The offices, reading and writing 
rooms, parlors and reception rooms of the 
Grand are fitted up in the most unexception- 
able style with all the modern conveniences, 
including telephonic communications; and the 
sleeping apartments are large, airy and luxu- 
rious. These rooms, 54 in number, have been 
newly furnished in the most approved style to 
meet the requirements of the better c!a\s of 
the traveling public. As now conducted, the 
Grand is an annex to the Huntington, meals 
for guests at the former being supplied at the 
latter house. Notwithstanding the fact that 
these hotels are first class in every respect, the 
rates have been reduced to the popular prices 
of $2.00 per day. Mr. J. H. Philbrook, the 
popular and efficient manager of these two- 
houses, is a native of the state of Maine, but 
has resided in Indiana for many years and 
been prominently identified with' hotel inter- 
ests in Richmond and other portions of the 
state. He is widely known and deservedly 
popular throughout this section, and the 
Huntington and Grand are the recognized 
headquarters in this city for the better cia»s of 
the traveling public. 



SECOND NATIONAL BANK, 
Cor. Eighth and Main Sts. 

Among the many contemporaneous institu- 
tions of a financial and fiduciary character in 
the state of Indiana, the Second National 
Bank of Richmond has, since its establish- 
ment, May 2Sth, 1S72, maintained a position of 
undoubted consideration. Founded in com- 
pliance with the requirements of the national 
banking system, this bank commenced opera- 
tions July 1st, 1S72, with a capital of $150,000, 
which was increased in September of the same 
year to $200,000, subsequently, in 1SS2, the 
capital was reduced to $150,000. Transacting 
a general bai.king business in all its depart- 
ments, the "Second National" solicits the 
accounts of merchants, corporations and indi- 
viduals and devotes especial attention to collec- 
tions, with correspondents in all the principal 
cities of the Union. The present officers of 
the bank are Andrew T. Scott, President; 
John B. Dougan, Cashier, and the Board of 
Directors is composed of the following well 
known citizens: Andrew F. Scott, William 
G. Scott, John M. Gaar, Abram Gaar, Robert 
Cox, Thomas W. Roberts, Ellis Thomas, 
Howell Graves and John B. Dougan, men of 
established reputation in the community and 
of recognized ability in the careful and suc- 
cessful business management of their own 
affairs and thoroughly conversant with the 
industrial, commercial and financial interests 
of the city and state. Most of these gentle- 
men have been identified with the policy of 
the bank since its inception and through their 
conservative and successful direction the insti- 
tution shows at the present time an accumu- 



34 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



lated surplus fund of $45,000. The policy of 
Us management will be in the future as it* has 
been in the past — to keep fully abreast of the 
times and to grant to its customers, patrons, 
depositors and correspondents as liberal terms 
as will be consistent for such an institution. 

W. W. FOULKE & CO., 

Iron and Steel Springs, Axles, etc., 
208 Ft. Wayne Ave. 

The senior member of the present firm of 
W. W. Foulke & Co. has been identified with 
the business interests of Richmond for more 
than a quarter of a century, having originally 
embarked in commercial pursuits as early a"s 
1854. A few years since he temporarily re- 
tired from participation in active business, but 
in 1SS2, in connection with his brother, Mr. 
John W. Foulke, re-entered the arena in which 
he had spent so many years and in 1SS3 the 
firm removed to their present location, where 
they carry a general line of bar iron and steel 
springs, axles, spokes, hubs, wheels and a 
great variety of iron and wood work for car- 
riage and wagon makers' use and blacksmiths' 
supplies. They also make a specialty of pur- 
chasing in large or small quantities scrap iron, 
wrought and cast, old lead, brass and copper, 
for which they pay in cash the highest market 
rates. They handle annually more than 
400,000 pounds of scrap iron, which they ship 
to manufacturers and dealers in the large cities, 
and transact an annual business of about 
$15,000. Their operations embrace both a 
■wholesale and retail business, in the latter line 
doing a larger amount than any similar estab- 
lishment in this section of the state. Mr. W. 
W. Foulke is a native of Maryland and was 
born in 1825. He came to this city with his 
parents when but six years of age and since 
attaining his majority has been almost unin- 
terruptedly engaged" in mercantile pursuits. 
Mr. John W. Foulke is a native and lifelong 
resident of Richmond and was born in 1S32. 



ROBINSON MACHINE WORKS, 

Manufactlkers of Portable Saw 
Mills, Engines, Threshers, etc. 
These works are the outgrowth of an enter- 
prise inaugurated in 1S42 by Mr. F. W. 
Robinson, who has for nearly half a century 
exercised a controlling interest in the man- 
agement of this extensive business and devoted 
the energies of a busy and studious lifetime to 
the development and perfecting of special 
machinery for saving grain and seeds and to 
the manufacture of improved devices for 
steam engines and general machinery. The" 
result of his experiments, labors and efforts 
has culminated in the perfection of what has 
been not inappropriately designated the '-Four 
Wonders of the Age," viz. : Robinson's Patent 
Bonanza Thresher, Robinson's Patent Auto- 
matic Safety Governor, Robinson's Patent 
Clover Attachment and Robinson's Patent 
Revolving Straw Stacker, each one of which 
presents a combination of ingenious mechani- 
cal principles, which practical experience has 



demonstrated to be the most efficacious fortlhr.e 
purposes for which they are designed. Isn 
1S7S the name and style of the Robinsata 
Machine Works, Robinson & Co., proprietor's, 
was adopted, the individual members of the 
firm as at present organized being Mr. F. W, 
Robinson, the founder and projector of tfo.e 
enterprise, and his son, Mr. Henry E. Robin- 
son. These extensive works in Richmond 
require the use of five commodious and sub- 
stantial buildings, with an aggregate grouird 
and floor area of more than $53,000 square 
feet, with ample yard space for storage pur- 
poses, etc. The various departments are sup- 
plied with the latest improved designs amid 
styles of special machinery, the motive power 
for which is furnished by one 50 horse power 
engine and boiler. An average force of abotnt 
75 skilled mechanics are employed, at a 
monthly expense of more than $2,500, and tike 
annual transactions of the company exceed 
$15,000, with a demand for their products ex- 
tending over the Middle and Western States 
and even to more remote sections of the Uniorr.. 
Among the specialties manufactured at thiis 
establishment are Robinson's Patent Bonanza 
Grain aud Flax Thresher, with clover hulltsr 
attachment and patent straw stacker, portable 
traction steam engines of any required power-, 
improved mounted farm engines, standard 
double circular saw mills, Robinson's patennt 
automatic safety governor, which is applied fee 




all engines manufactured by the company arn.d 
which is pronounced by practical engineers 
and experts to be "perfect in action and a mar- 
vel of accuracy and sensitiveness; the Eureka 
revolving and folding stacker, which fill*- a 
want hitherto unsupplied and which caniuot 
fail to be appreciated by farmers and thresbrar 
men everywhere; Robinson's patent doner 
huller attachment, although but about two 
years before the public, has met with the raa St 
unequivocal success and is fully warranted to 
be superior to any other huller in use; Robim- 
son's improved apron thresher and separalajr 



1414538 







« 



V 



Ifer?— ? 

OT|H , 

Sftw ft 







36 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



with measuring, registering and sacking appa- 
ratus, to which was awarded a gold medal at 
the Indiana State Fair for its fast theshingand 
grain saving qualities; Robinson's patent 
Sweepstakes drag saw, arranged for steam or 
horse power; feed mills, corn and cob mills, 
etc. In addition to the articles above enumer- 
ated this company has uneqalled facilities for 
the manufacture'of horse powers of any de- 
scription, line shafting, with hangers or box- 
ing, pulleys of any size or weight, steam 
pumps, inspirators, injectors, belting, saws, 
brass fittings, and in fact any article usually 
found in a first class machine shop. The 
company publishes an attractire illustrated 
pamphlet and price list, which will be for- 
warded to any address upon application and 
which will be found to contain matter inter- 
esting and important to farmers and mechan- 
ics. Mr. F. W. Robinson, the founder of these 
works, is a native of Baltimore, Md., where he 
was born December 9th, 1810. He has re- 
sided in Richmond for more than half a cen- 
tury and been in active business life for more 
than 50 years, the greater portion of which 
period has been devoted to the manufacture of 
farm machinery, engines, etc. He has made 
many important improvements and as a skill- 
ful mechanic and ingenious inventor is entitled 
to prominent rank among the representative 
benefactors of his time. His son and business 
associate, Mr. Henry E. Robinson, is a native 
and lifelong resident of Richmond, where he 
was born October 10th, 1S39. He, like his 
father, has devoted the greater portion of his 
life to this special branch of industry and upon 
him at the present time devolves the manage- 
ment and control of the office business and the 
financial details of the extensive business of 
the company. 



RICHMOMD WOOLEN MILLS, 

W. Test & Bros., Propr.'s; Richmond 

AND HaGERSTOWX. 

The first woolen mill of any magnitude in 
Wayne County was erected in 1S55 by Mr. 
Alpheus Test, who conducted the business 
successfully until October, 1859, when the 
mill with its machinery was destroyed by fire. 
Mr. Test rebuilt his works in December of 
the same year and continued the manufacture 
of yarns until 1S65, when he disposed of his 
interest to a firm consisting of William, Rufus 
and Oliver Test. November 29th, 1S66, the 
buildings were again destroyed by fire, but 
reconstructed the following spring with in- 
creased facilities- The bu-iness continuing to 
expand, a new building was added in 1873, 
devoted especially to the manufacture of yarns. 
The building, which is 50x100 feet in dimen- 
sions, is substantially built of stone, with metal 
roof and cement floors, and is practically fire 
proof. The original building is a substantial 
.two and one-half story structure 30x61 feet in 
size. The machinery employed is first class 
in every respect and embraces two sets of 48 
inch cards, two 240 spindle jacks and other 
special devices, propelled by water power sup- 



plied from the White Water River and by one- 
20 horse power engine and boiler of improved! 
construction for the drying and coloring de- 
partment. These mills are very complete andi 
use annually from 75,000 to 85,000 pounds- 
of wool, transacting a business of more than 
$30,000 per year. From 15 to 20 hands are 
employed and the Richmond Mills have be- 
come famous throughout the country for their 
superior products. The sale of yarns extends 
to all sections of the Union, the' principal de- 
mand being from hosiery manufacturers in the 
large cities. During the past two seasons this 
house has furnished to the Soldiers' Home, of 
Dayton, O., about 25,000 pounds of yarn and 
large orders are being received from various 
parts of the United States. In 1SS1 Mr. Oli- 
ver Test withdrew from the firm and the busi- 
ness since that time has been conducted by 
Messrs. William and Rufus Test, who are 
natives of Union County and have had a life- 
long experience in this branch of industrial 
enterprise. Telephonic communications are 
enjoyed with this and adjacent towns and cities. 

THE WHITE BRANCH WOOLEN MILLS, 

at Hagerstown, are also owned and controlled, 
by this firm, the operations there being under 
the management of Rufus Test. These mills- 
have been in the control of the present firm 
since 1884. It was formerly devoted to the 
manufacture of yarns and woolen goods, but 
at the present time is chiefly devoted to the 
manutacture of jeans, cassimers, sattinetts, 
blankets and flannels, with a local trade in 
yarns, etc. The operations of this house alone 
have a local trade of about 25/^00 to 3o,ocx> 
pounds of wool annually and its trade is chiefly 
derived trom adjacent towns and country. 

JAMES F. GRIFFIN, 

Plumber, Steam and Gas Fitter, 922 

and 924 Main St. 
To the skill of the plumber in introducing 
water into our homes and places of business- 
and in arranging our sewerage system on 
scientific principles, our cities at the present 
day are highly indebted for their improved, 
condition, while the artistic ability displayed 
in the gas and steam fixtures, which are 
now such important adjuncts of civilization, 
adds largely to the adornment of our rooms- 
and to our comfort and convenience as well. 
For these reasons the avocation of the plumber,, 
gas and steam fitter is an important one, which 
cannot be overlooked in a review of the indus- 
tries of this city. The leading artizan in this 
branch of business in Richmond is Mr. James- 
F. GrirTin, located in a large and commodious 
salesroom, 44x100 teet in size, at Nos. 922 and 
924 Main i>f., where he carries a large and 
comprehensive stock of articles pertaining to 
this line, such as plumbers' supplies, gas,, 
steam and water pipe, chandeliers, brackets 
and gas stoves, and is prepared to contract for 
work in either department of his business at 
the lowest rates consistent with reliable, first 
class and conscientious fulfillment of obliga- 
tions. Three experienced assistants are regu- 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 



S7 



larly employed and all work is fully guaran- 
teed. Prior to the establishment of his present 
house, in 1873, he filled the responsible posi- 
tion of superintendent of the Gas Works. 



NICHOLSON & BRO, 

Booksellers and Stationers, Odd 
Fellows Building and Nos. 12, 14 
and 16 South Eighth St, 
This house stands confessedly at the head 
of all similar establishments in Wayne County 
and ranks among the first and most important 
of its class in the state of Indiana. Estab- 
lished as early as 1S60, the business has now 
been conducted under the same firm name 
and style for a period closely approximating a 
quarter of a century and from its very incep- 
tion its career has been characterized by a 
steady and marked increase of annual trans- 
actions. The business is conducted in three 
distinct departments, the sub-divisions being 
as follows: the book and stationery depart- 
ment, on the first floor, at 729 Main St., is 
23x100 feet in dimensions and stocked with a 
complete and comprehensive assortment of 
merchandise in this line. The wall paper and 
shade department is on the second floor, where 
may be lbund in stock the common grades as 
well as the most expensive and elegant styles 
of wall papers and decorations, the latest 
designs and novelties being received and dis- 
played here simultaneously with their appear- 
ance in the Eastern cities. Their book bindery 
and paper box manufactory occupies two 
rooms, each 40x60 feet in size, equipped with 
the most approved devices of machinery and 
appliances and furnishing steady employment 
to a force of 12 to 15 skilled operative* in their 
respective departments. From the bindery is 
turned out elegant specimens of blank books 
for a variety of purposes, which will not suffer 
by comparison with those manufactured at the 
most famous establishments East or West, 
and to the work of this department the special 
attention of banks, insurance companies and 
merchants is particularly invited. Mr. Tim- 
othy Nicholson, the senior member of this 
representative firm, is a native of North Caro- 
lina but has resided in Richmond since 1S61 
and has been for more than 20 years promi- 
nently identified with the busines's interests of 
the city and with the literary and educational 
institutions of the state. " He occupied for 
nearly 10 years a responsible position as a 
member of the Board of Trustees of the Suite 
Normal School, at Terre Haute, and has also 
served in the capacity of Trustee of Earlham 
College for about 19 years and is at the pres- 
ent time Secretary of the Morrison Library. 
Mr. J. H. Nicholson, also a native of North 
Carolina, was born in 1S57 but has been a resi- 
dent of Richmond since 1S61. He has the 
general superintendent of the book bindery 
and has been connected with that department 
of the business since 1S76. The trade ot the 
house is both wholesale and retail and extends 
to various sections of this and adjacent counties. 



C. A. DICKINSON, 

Jkweler, No. 712 Main Street. 
In Richmond the name of C. A. Dickinson 
and jewelry are inseparable, and have long 
since become synonymous, in consequence of 
the lengthy and intimate association of this 
enterprising merchant with the jewelry trade 
of this section, his operations in this line ex- 
tending over a full half century, with but a 
few unimportant interruptions. Mr. Dickin- 
son was born on the 15th of April, 1812, in 
Philadelphia, and came to Richmond in 1S22, 
where he married his present wife in 1S34. 
The store occupied by him is 22x110 feet in 
dimensions, and is located in the Vaughan 
block, the most attractive business structure 
in the city. His handsomely appointed and 
thoroughly stocked salesroom constitutes one 
of the most attractive features of our principal 
business thoroughfare, and his elegant plate 
glass cases are filled with a valuable and care- 
fully selected stock of fine foreign and Ameri- 
can watches in gold and silver cases, elegant 
articles of jewelery in chaste and artistic de- 
signs, solid silver and fine plated ware, and 
all articles pertaining to this branch of trade. 
He is ably assisted by is son, Mr. H. C. 
Dickinson, whose special department is fine 
watch, clock ard jewelery repairing, which is 
made a prominent feature of the business. 
Both Mr. Dickinson and his son are practical 
watch makers, and are thoroughly conversant 
with the delicate mechanism of" the various 
makes of American and foreign watches. 



QJJAKER CITY MILLS, 

F. H. Stafford, Prop., North End of 
Twelfth St. 
The Quaker City Flouring Mills, at the 
northern extremity "of Twelfth St., on a tribu- 
tary of the White' Water River, although not 
the largest, are undoubtedly the finest and 
most thoroughly equipped mills of the kind in 
this section of the state and are erected upon 
the site of the oldest flouring mills in Wayne 
County, which were established upon a primi- 
tive scale as early as in 1S15 in a small build- 
ing containing a single run of stone, propelled 
by the old style overshot water wheel. Mr. 
Charles Moffitt, one of the early pioneers in. 
this part of the state, was the original proprie- 
tor and the business was conducted by him for 
a period of 30 years, when, in 1S45, he was 
succeeded by his son, Mr. Hugh Moffitt. In 
1S50 the mills passed into the possession of 
Benjamin Ful^hum, who was succeeded suc- 
cessively by Hill & Wethrall, Hill ^ Hill, 
Hill & Stafford and F. H. Stafford Si Co , by 
whom the mill was operated until April. iSSj, 
when it was destroyed by fire. Mr. F. H. 
Stafford, the senior member of the last named 
firm and the present proprietor, immediately 
commenced the work of reconstruction and 
the result of his enterprise is seen in the 
model structure, with its admirable equip- 
ment, which has taken the place of the old 
mills on this site. The present building is a 
substantial three and one-half story brick 



38 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



structure 36x40 feet in dimensions, containing 
two run of stones, the motive power for which 
is furnished by water from the never failing 
stream above noticed, employing two 42 inch 
American turbine wheels. The oid process 
sjstem, which is so favorably regarded in this 
section, has been retained, all the recent 
modern improvements in machinery and 
methods being introduced, and the capacity of 
the mill is 75 barrels every 24 hours. The 
various brands manufactured here rank de- 
servedly high in the home markets, as well as 
in the 'East, and a large amount of custom 
work is performed. Mr. F. H. Stafford is- a 
native of Pennsylvania but has been a resi- 
dent of Richmond for the past 17 years and 
during this entire period has been prominently 
identified with the milling interests of the city. 
He is a practical miller of more than 20 years 
experience. 

RICHMOND ROLLER SKATE CO., 
Marchant, Phillips & Co., Propr.'s, 
No. 1,031 North E St. 
This company was organized June 26th, 
1883, for the purpose of manufacturing and 
placing upon the market a specially improved 
roller skate, on which, since that time, an 
additional improvement has been made and 
patented February 5th, 1SS4. The improved 
roller skate now manufactured by this com- 
pany holds a strong claim to unlimited public 
favor in the following points of excellence: 
1st — Because it is not spoiled in any attempt 
to make it cheap. 2d — Because it can be used 
by professionals and amateurs, and for rink 
and fancy skating it has no equal. 3d — It 
has the largest wheels ever put on a roller 
skate and can be turned in a 30 inch circle 
with all wheels resting upon the Soor. 4th — 
Because the wheels are of finest Turkish box- 
wood. 5th — Because the castings are of the 
best malleable iron, light and durable, as well 
as of most handsome construction and appear- 
ance. 6th — Because these and other features 
of superiority are so self evident to ail who 
examine them and the fact that they are 
always in order; it is no trouble for the dealers 
to sell or customers to use. It may also be 
noted here that the inventive genius and 
ability associated with this company presents 
the assurance of the highest excellence in the 
products of this house, and if the possibilities 
of further improvements lie hidden in the im- 
mediate future, this establishment will not be 
found taking a second place in the advance. 
This firm are prepared to fill orders from all 
sections of the Union in large or small quanti- 
ties, to the trade, and are constantly improving 
their facilities to meet the growing demand 
upon their works. Mr. Joseph Marchant, the 
senior member of this firm, is a native of 
Massachusetts and came to this city in 1S54, 
since which time he has been prominently 
identified with manufacturing and commercial 
enterprises and is at the present time asso- 
ciated with Mr. Ira Haynes under the firm 
name of Marchant, Haynes & Co., manufac- 



turers of "White Lily" baking powder and 
fine extracts, noticed elsewhere in this work. 
Mr. EKvood C. Phillips is a native of this 
county and was formerly employed at his 
trade for some years, that of carriage body 
maker. He possesses inventive genius of a 
high order, and besides being the patentee of 
the improvements here introduced in the roller 
skate, he has at various times secured 12 dif- 
ferent patents from the United States Govern- 
ment for valuable inventions, some of which 
are now largely handled by other houses. 



STARR'S NEW CLOTHING STORE, 
Strictly One Price; No. 620 Maim 
St., Opp. Grand Hotel. 
The clothing business and its associated in- 
terests is one of the most important of our 
industrial and commercial enterprises and is 
controlled by our most reliable and energetic 
merchants. Enjoving the fullest advantages 
to be secured in this department of trade" is 
"Starr's New Clothing Store," now located at 
620 Main St., opposite the Grand Hotel, and it 
is safe to assert that not only in the superior 
excellence of stocks carried, but in the judi- 
cious business policy which characterizes its 
operations, is this house entitled to the leading 
position it occupies among its contemporaries 
in Eastern Indiana. The premises occupied 
embrace a fine business room i6xioS feet in 
dimensions, which is not only fitted up in 
metropolitan style but completely stocked in 
every department with a new and comprehen- 
sive line of ready made and custom made 
clothing from the choicest fabrics of both for- 
eign and American looms, for men, youth, 
boys and children's wear, hats, caps, trunks 
and valises, besides a full stock and newest 
designs of gentlemen's furnishing goods. 
Special attention is paid to securing styli-h 
and durable garments, manufactured espe- 
cially for their own trade, while in other 
departments their goods are secured direct 
from manufacturers and first hands, thus 
securing every possible advantage in prices 
known to the trade and their ability to com- 
pete in prices with the largest and most relia- 
ble houses of any of our metropolitan cities. 
No other house in this or any other depart- 
ment of trade in this city has evinced a more 
intelligent conception of the requirements of 
trade nor exhibited more liberal spirit of enter- 
prise in the successful effort to draw trade to 
this market which would otherwise have 
sought other trade centers. Messrs. Starr & 
Co. are believers in the efficacy of printers' 
ink, judiciously distributed, and in addition to 
being liberal patrons of the local press, pub- 
lish an interesting and ably conducted monthly 
paper, devoted to the interests of trade, with "a 
guaranteed circulation of 6000, which is often 
increased to 7,000, and is gratuitously dis- 
tributed throughout this and adjoining coun- 
ties. This paper is under the editorial 
management of O. D. Starr, who has through 
this medium largely contributed to the promo- 
tion of the commercial enterprises of this city. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 



3$ 



WILLIAM CAIN, 

Lumber, S. E. Cor. Eleventh and 

Main Sts. 
Among the more substantial and reliable of 
our representative merchants will be found the 
names ot many engaged in this department of 
commercial enterprise ;ind none more worthily 
entitled to favorable consideration than that of 
Mr. William Cain, whose offices and princi- 
pal yards are located at the southeast corner 
of Eleventh and Main Sts., where he occupies 
commodious quarters for the storage of sea- 
soned stock and manufactured materials for 
building purposes, such as doors, sash, blinds, 
weather-boarding, window and door frames, 
flooring, etc. An adjacent lot on Eleventh 
St., with an area of 100x150 feet, is also used 
for the storage of hard and soft wood lumber, 
thus furnishing the amplest facilities for the 
transaction of his extensive business Sup- 
plies are received direct from manufacturers, 
with whom in various sections of this and 
adjoining states Mr. Cain has perfected satis- 
factory and advantageous arrangements, and 
parties purchasing for shipment or for building 
purposes can procure at all times any desired 
dimensions, either in carload quantities or 
small lots, at the most favorable rates. Mr. 
Cain became proprietor of these yards in 1S78, 
succeeding Mr. W. I. Dulin, who established 
the business at this location six years pre- 
viously, and it is safe to assert that no house 
in this branch of business in this section of the 
state can boast of a more extensive and satis- 
factory trade than that which forms the subject 
of the present sketch. Mr. William Cain is a 
native of Ohio and was born at Chillicothe, 
Ross County, in 1S41. He has resided in 
Richmond for nearly a quarter of a century 
and been engaged in the lumber trade since 
1S61 at other locations, previous to assuming 
the control of his present establishment. His 
uniformly honorable and conscientious meth 
ods of transacting business have ensured for 
him a large and prosperous trade as well as 
the highest confidence and respect of all with 
whom for the past 20 years he has enjoved 
business relations. 



R. R. VANSANT, 

Wholesale and Retail Confectioner, 

No. 711 Main St. 
This house makes a specialty of handling 
the finest varieties both of French and Ameri- 
can candies. It is the recognized headquar- 
ters in Richmond for the wholesale and retail 
trade and its transactions embrace not only the 
better class of city patronage but aNo an ex- 
tended area of territory contiguous to and 
dependent upon Richmond as a base of sup- 
plies. The present house was established by 
Mr. Vansant in 18S0, although he had indi- 
vidually and as a member of the firm of Van- 
sant & Davis been previously identified for 
several years with this special branch of in- 
dustry and commerce in this qjty. His sales- 
room, which is i6xSo feet in dimensions, is 
eligibly located, tastefully fitted up and ar- 



ranged and stocked with a choice and carefully 
selected assortment of the finest varieties of 
imported and domestic confectionery in its 
most attractive forms, which he is enabled to 
offer to the trade or to purchasers at retail at 
prices as low as similar articles can be ob- 
tained in metropolitan establishments. Abso- 
lute purity of material and freedom from all 
deleterious admixtures are guaranteed by Mr. 
Vansant, who devotes his personal attention 
to the selection of stock, his practical experi- 
ence as a manufacturer enabling him to detect 
the slightest traces of adulteration, thus ensur- 
ing to his patrons that most important defed- 
eration in these days of terra alba and glucose, 
pure and reliable articles in everv department. 
Three salesmen and assistants 'are regularlv 
emploved and all representations made by 
them will be found to accord strictly with 
facts. Mr. Richard R. Vansant, the proprie- 
tor of this representative house, is a native of 
Wayne County and was born in Richmond in 
1S40. From a comparatively small beginning 
he has succeeded, by enterprise and honorable 
dealing, in establishing a trade which now 
amounts to more than $10,000 per annum and 
which is steadily increasing. 

NORDYKE & HADLEY, 

Dealers in New and Second-Hand 
Furniture, House Furnishing Goods, 
Etc., 416 Main St. 
This enterprising firm established them- 
selves at their present location in 1SS2, and the 
house is the largest of the kind in the city. 
The business is located in a fine business struc- 
ture, the entire three floors and basement of 
which is occupied in the storage of goods, each 
floor being 27x190 feet in dimensions, with a 
workshop in the rear where goods are repaired. 
T%vo salesmen are employed, in addition to the- 
members of the firm, and the mammoth stock 
carried embraces a general assortment of sec- 
ond-hand goods, most of which is nearly new, 
having been but little used, new and second- 
hand furniture, general house furnishing goods, 
stove«, ranges, carpenters and other toois, etc. 
The firm pay the highest price for all kinds of 
second-hand goods, and receive and deliver 
goods in any part of the city and vicinity, be- 
sides having ample facilities for storing stoves 
and household furniture at reasonable rates. 
The individual members of the firm are David 
Nordyke and John C. Hadlev, both natives of 
Ohio, Mr Nordyke having been horn in 1S15 
and Mr. Hadley in 1S14. Mr. Nordyke has 
been a resident of Richmond for thirty-five 
years, and previous to entering into the pres- 
ent copartnership was engaged in the same 
line of business for nine years, during which 
time he controlled a largeand lucrative trade, 
having a thorough and practical knowledge of 
the business. Mr. Hadley is also an old resi- 
dent of Richmond, and tor the past 20 years 
has been identified with the insurance busi- 
ness, filling the office of Secretary of the Rich- 
mond Board of Underwriters ever since that 
organization was founded. He has also filled 



40 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



the office of Township Trustee In a most ac- 
ceptable manner for a number of years. Mr. 
Clark H. Hadley, his son, is also identified 
with the firm, and was born in Ohio in 1849. 
He has been a resident of Richmond for 39 
years. 

J. C ALBRIGHT & CO., 

Tinsmiths, Galvanized Iron Work, 
Slate and Iron Roofing and Gen- 
eral Jobbing, No. 22 North Ninth St. 
This house was founded in 1SS0 by the 
present senior member of the firm, who con- 
ducted the business in his own name until 
January, 1883, when the present partnership 
was formed by the admission of Mr. J. S. Zel- 
ler to an interest in the business. The premi- 
ses occupied for sales and storage purposes, at 
No. 22 North Ninth St., are 18x119 feet in 
dimensions and the most approved devices for 
tin, copper and sheet iron work in their 
various branches are employed. Five assist- 
ants are engaged in the manufacturing depart- 
ment, turning out a great variety of articles, 
including tin, copper, zinc and sheet iron ware, 
galvanized iron work of every description, 
guttering and spouting and to general 
job work in all its ramifications and depart- 
ments, special attention being given to slate, 
tin and iron roofing. In this branch of indus- 
try this house stands especially prominent in 
this and surrounding counties. The facilities 
enjoyed by this firm are not surpassed by 
those of any contemporaneous establishment 
and their transactions will compare favorably 
with those of any similar house in the city. 
Mr. J. C. Albright is a practical tin and sheet 
iron worker who has had many years experi- 
ence in this special branch of industry and is 
thoroughly familiar with all its details and 
requirements. He is a native of Ohio, where 
he was born in 1S52, but has resided in Indi- 
ana since 1S56. Mr. J. S. Zeller is a native of 
Ohio, born in 1S41, and has resided in Rich- 
mond since 1S65. In addition to his interest 
in the above named firm he is also engaged in 
the manufacture of an improved eave gutter, 
noticed in anothes portion of the present work 
under its appropriate head. 

ILIFF BROTHERS, 

Toys, Notions and Fancy Goods, No. 

53S Main Street. 
The shelves, counters and cases of this 
model establishment are filled to repletion with 
a choice and beautiful assortment of imported 
and American toys, musical merchandise, no- 
tions, fancy goods, baby carriages in variety, 
china, glass and parian vases and ornaments 
in antique and modern styles, fancy articles in 
every conceivable variety and seemingly for 
every conceivable purpose, jewelry in great 
profusion and a perfect museum of novelties, 
curiosities and articles of vertu, books, maga- 
zines, novelettes and periodical literature, illus- 
trated story and comic papers and such an 
endless variety of miscellaneous merchandise 
as to defy all attempts at enumeration in the 



limited space allotted in the present volume. 
This is the only house in the city dealing ex- 
clusively In this special line of merchandise 
and consequently purchasers will find here 
more complete and varied assortments in each 
department than are usually kept in smaller 
establishments in which fancy goods and no- 
tions constitute only a minor portion of their 
stock. The present firm, composed of Messrs. 
Will S. and J. E. Iliff, established this business 
upon a comparatively moderate scale in 1866 
and during the past seventeen years have built 
up a prosperous and thriving trade increasing 
in volume each succeeding year. In 18S2 their 
sales amounted In round numbers to about 
$ 18,000 and in 1S83 to more than $20,000, 
while indications point to a still more gratify- 
ing increase in the not tar distant future. The 
premises occupied for the display of their stock 
embraces three entire floors, each 20x60 feet 
in dimensions at the location above designa- 
ted,and three assistants are regularly employed. 
Both members of the firm are natives and life 
long residents of Richmond, and have since 
early manhood been prominently '"dentified 
with the growth and commercial prosperity of 
the city and have acquired an enviable reputa- 
tion as reliable and enterprising merchants. 

H. R. DOWNING ic SON, 

Undertakers, No. 16 North Eighth 

Street. 
The leading establishment in Richmond, 
transacting probably nine-tenths of all the 
business in this line, is the one above noted, 
who occupy one entire floor 16x150 feet in size. 
Owing to the facilities enjoyed by this house 
for procuring caskets and burial cases direct 
from manufacturers located here as required, 
no large stock is carried on hand to become 
soiled or disfigured and tarnished, and the very 
latest and most approved styles are always fur- 
nished to patrons. They are prepared" at all 
times to take entire charge of funerals and by 
the most approved process know to embalm 
bodies for burial or for removal to distant 
points, They have two fine hearses of modern 
style, elegant and chaste in design and supply 
carriages as desired for funeral purposes. This 
house was established by the senior member 
of the present firm in 1S77 and was then loca- 
ted at the corner of Ninth and South A Sts. 
The following year he removed to his present 
eligible location and in 1S80 his son, Henry C. 
Downing, was admitted to an interest in the 
business. Mr. II. R. Downing is a native of 
Pennsylvania but has resided in Richmond 
since 1S37. Previous to embarking in his 
present enterprise he was associated with the 
well known firm of Ezra Smith & Co., coffin 
and casket manufacturers, in charge of the un- 
dertaking department, with all the details of 
which he is thoroughly conversant. His son, 
Mr. H. C Downing, is an Indianian by nativi- 
ty, and was born in this city in 1S57. The firm 
is one of our most reliable and competent ones 
and all business entrusted to them will receive 
prompt, careful and conscientious attention. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 



41 



DILLE & McGUIRE MANUFACTUR- 
ING COMPANY, 
Improved Oscillating Slide-Valve 
Steam Engines and the Richmond 
"Star" Lawn Mower, Cor. North 
Thirteenth St. and Railroad. 
This enterprise was inaugurated in 1S74, at 
■which time the firm of Dille & McGuire was 




formed for the purpose of engaging in the 
manufacture of lawn mowers, reaping ma- 
chine knife grinders, etc. These articles, 
which constituted the principal products of 
the firm for about, seven years, attained a high 
degree of popularity and the trade of the firm 
steadily increased, until 1SS1, at which time 
a stock company was organized under the 
title above given and duly incorporated under 
the state laws. Under the new administration 
the facilities of the works were largely in- 



creased and several new features introduced, 
to which special attention is directed. The 
manufacture of an improved oscillating slide- 
valve steam engine (a cut of which is here 
appended) forms a feature which cannot fail to 
elicit investigation and interest on the part of 
those employing machinery. For compact- 
ness, safety, economy and general utility for 
all practical purposes, this en- 
gine is particularly desirable 
and is meeting with a large sale 
in all parts of the country and 
is destined to displace and super- 
cede the more cumbersome and 
less practical engines in use, for 
which these engines are espe- 
cially adapted. These engines 
will occupy about the same 
space as an ordinary barrel and 
the perfection and ingenuity 
with which they are constructed 
renders them almost noiseless 
in operation, while but little 
fuel is required to run them. 
They range in capacity from 
two to 30 horse power and pre- 
sent many other features of ex- 
cellence and superiority. Their 
manufacture and sale are ex- 
clusively in the control of this 
company and the demand has 
already extended to many re- 
mote sections of the United 
States. The Richmond lawn 
Mower, patented in April, 1SS0, 
is also another popular imple- 
ment manufactured by this 
company, embracing the follow 
ing recommendations to public 
favor: (1.) The high speed of 
reel knives, which are made of 
the best spring steel. (2.) Its 
rear cut and adjustable roller, 
enabling it to be used on un- 
even ground. (3.) Its adjusta- 
ble and floating handle, enabling 
the operator to handle it as -well 
down a terrace as on level 
ground. (4.) The drive wheel 
so arranged, with handle 
pivoted at a point on frame, 
that it is impossible to slip the 
■wheel when mower is at work. 
(5.) The driving wheel can al- 
ways run on the cut, and not 
tread down the standing grass. 
(6.) The Star wheel being nar- 
rower, the mower can be run close to walks, 
walls, fences and foundation of houses. 
(7.) The cutter bar is made of the best cast 
steel and is so arranged with adjusting screws 
that it may always be kept in close contact 
with the revolving cutters. (S.) The mower 
may be turned upside down when being 
moved from place to place. (9.) The small 
pinion is screwed on the cutter spindle and 
cannot come off unless desired. . (10.) The 
ratchet is noiseless, being operated by a series 



«' 



42 



STATE OF INDIANA. 




<SL " -A ; jf 



A I " '<; 



r, 






of inclines, making a positive clutch having no 
springs, (n.) Trie roller arms are so arranged 
that the mower may be raised or lowered, to 
regulate the height of cut. (12.) The mower 
is self-sharpening and is the only one that can 
have the revolving cutter revolved backward 
without removing any part of mower. This 
is effected by inserting small end of wrench 
into hole made in drive wheel, so as to engage 
the gear. (13.) The handle is pivoted at side 
of driving wheel, where the power is both 
applied and generated, causing no side draft 
whatever, also allowing mower to run under 
shrubbery. These products form a considera- 
ble item of the transactions of the establish- 
ment, although comprising many other 
features. The buildings formerly occupied 
were found inadequate to meet the require- 
ments of their growing business, and in Sep- 
tember, 1SS3, the present buildings were 
erected and occupied, embracing a ground 
space of 65X1S0 feet in dimensions, which 
grounds were purchased by the company and 
the buildings erected by them, equipped" with 
special labor saving machinery. An average 
force of from 15 to zo skilled workmen are 
now employed and the annual transactions of 
the company closely approximate S^.ooo. 
The officers of the company as at present or- 
ganized are E. W. McGuire, Sr., President; 
E. W. McGuire, Jr., Secretary and Treasurer, 
and H. H. Di'.le. Superintendent. They are 
all practical and skilled mechanic-- and bring 
to the enterprise in which they are eng 
ripe experience ar.d a thorough con. prehen- 
sion of the requirements of the business. 
Correspondence relating to the products will 
elicit pro:.:pt attention and definite informa- 
tion. Telephonic connection is enjoyed with 
all the principal towns in this section* 



RICHMOND TRUCK MANUFACTUR- 
ING COMPANY, 

Manufacturers of the Richmond 
Binder, Drill and General Purpose 
Truck. 
Among the late inventions in the way of 
agricultural machinery there are none that 
appear to possess more real merit than does 
the above truck, patened January 30th, 1SS3, 
and an examination will fully substantiate the 
manufacturers' claim of the most practical, 
amplest and best truck made. By its use the 
heaviest self-binder can be loaded or unloaded 
in 10 minutes by one man, without any lifting 
whatever. When loaded it can be drawn 
through an eight foot gate or over an ordi- 
narv road as easilv as a road wagon and those 
familiar with binders will admit the necessity 
of some way to remove them from one field or 
farm to another. Aside from this, their front 
truck, when attached to a drill, binder, mower 
or field roller, will take the weight off the 
horses 1 necks and will do away with the "side- 
lash" of the tongue against the horses, which 
is necessarily occasioned by the use of the 
stiff tongue. When attached to a binder, two 
horses will do tiie work as easily as three will 
do it without the tiuck; the amount of it all 
being that it gives a four wheeled drill, roller, 
etc., and in this alone we claim it to save more 
wear of hor-e flesh than any other farm im- 
plement costing five times "the money. At- 
tached to a harrow, the farmer can ride and 
harrow and save the trudging over newly 
ploughed ground; The company will gladly 
furnish anv information desired, and to the 
trade would say that they have- something 'hat 
can be sold or that will sell itself if shown. 
They have ample facilities for the manufac- 



I 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 



43 



ture of the machines and would be glad to 
hear from all interested. The officers of the 
companyare Joseph Henley. President; Robert 
Furnace, Vice President;* David Hill, Treas- 
urer,- and Webster Parry, Secretary. The 
Board of Directors is composed of seven 
members, including the above named gentle- 
men, with Joseph Radcliff Robert Che-ter- 
ville, the patentee, and Henry Hill. Mr. 
Henly, the President, is a native of this county 
and one of Richmond's oldest and most relia- 
ble business men. He is an extensive dealer 
in lumber, sash, doors, etc., with which line of 
trade he has been identified since 1S67. 



D. B. CRAWFORD & SON, 

Dry Goods, Notions, etc., 528 Main St. 
Mr. D. B. Crawford, the senior member of 
the well known rlrm of D. B. Crawford & Son, 
of this city, is a native of Maryland, in which 
state he was born in 1S07. In 1S35 he pur- 
chased a considerable tract of land in this 
county, and though educated to mercantile 
pursuits, he speedily adapted himself to the 
life of the sturdy pioneer. But 2S years of 
age, possessing a vigorous constitution and 
indomitable energy, he labored early and late 
and as a consequent result met with very good 
success in his undertaking within a few years. 
After 10 years time the laborious duties of the 
farm and its attendant hardships began to 
effect his health and he resolved to once more 
embark in mercantile life, and accordingly 
opened a general store, carrying in stock a 
large variety and assortment of miscellaneous 
merchandise. In this line he continued until 
1872, when his son, Mr. John Y. Crawford, 
was admitted to an interest in the business and 
the present firm name and style was adopted. 
With the organization of the new firm the 
business was modernized, the old stock of 
general merchandise was disposed of, various 
lines of goods were dropped entirely and a 
new and desirable stock of dry goods, notions, 
carpets, curtains and similar merchandise per- 
taining to a first class metropolitan establish- 
ment of this character was secured and from 
that time to the present the house has been 
regarded as among the leading ones in this 
line in Wayne County. The building occu- 
pied by the firm was erected by the senior 
member of the firm and is a solid and substan- 
tial brick structure with iron front and is 
20x150 feet in dimensions. The entire build- 
ing is occupied by the firm for the storage ofa 
stock of merchandise which will for extent, 
variety and completeness bear favorable com- 
parison with that of any similar establishment 
in Richmond. In 1 -"50 Mr. D. B. Crawford 
was chosen by the people of Wayne County 
as County Commissioner and so acceptably 
did he discharge the duties devolving upon 
him that he was retained in office for more 
than 15 years and peremptorily declined are- 
election at the end oi that time. During the 
noted John Morgan raid he raised a company 
of volunteers, which were known as "Minute 
Men" and designated as Company I, of the 



6th Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Militia, of 
whice company he was commissioned Captain 
by the Governor of Indiana. Mr. Crawford 
is also at the present time a stockholder in 
the Richmond City Mill Works, no^ed else- 
where, and a member of the Board of Direc- 
tors of the First National Bank. As the 
!. gitimate result of a well spent, prude.it and 
judicious business career, characterized by a 
strict adherence to the principles of integrity 
ana honor, he has amassed a handsome com- 
petency and established a reputation of which 
he may justly feel proud. His son and pres- 
ent business associate, Mr. John Y. Crawford, 
is a native and lifelong resident of Wayne 
County, where he was born in November, 
1S35. He has been thoroughly educated to 
the business in which he is engaged, having 
spent more than 25 years in his father's store 
in the capacity of clerk and partner. 



EZRA SMITH & CO. MANUFACTUR- 
ING ASSOCIATION, 
Richmond Coffin and Casket Works, 
Cor. Ninih and South A Sts. 
This association, now one of the most ex- 
tensive of its class in the West, was formed in 
1S72 with a capital of $50,000, which has since 
increased to $ico,coo. The premises occupied 
for manufacturing purposes comprise three 
spacious and substantial brick buildings, with 
an aggregate floor space of 45,000 teet, and an 
average force of 65 skilled and experienced 
workmen are employed in the different depart- 
ments, necessitating an annual disbursement 
for the item of iabor alone of more than 
Sao.oco. The works are equipped throughout 
with special designs of improved machinery, 
propelled by one 40 horse power engine and 
boiler. The best stock, materials and trim- 
mings are used in the manufacture ot more 
than 30 different styles of fine solid and imita- 
tion walnut and cloth covered caskets, fine 
wood burial cases, etc. This company are 
also exclusive agents in this section for Chap- 
pell, Chase, Maxwell & Co.'s superior cloth 
covered caskets, casket pedestals, etc., and 
carry constantly in stock complete and com- 
prehensive lines of undertakers' hardware, 
trimmings, robe-, linings and general supplies, 
which they are enabled to furnish to the trade 
at rates as low as can beoffered by the leading 
metropolitan establishments East or West. 
Explanatory illustrated circulars are issued by 
ciation, with price lists tbr the trade, 
and will be sent to dealers upon application. 
The demand for their products extends to all 
sections of the Middle, Western ai d So 
states, while the annual transact] >ns .. ex- 
ceed $200,000. The officers ot '..._• association 
a? ..: present organized are Ezra Smith, Presi- 
d James Smith, Secretary and Treas- 
ure'-. These gentlemen art both old residents 
of this state and have been for many years 

smtly identified, with the uevelc 
and advancement of the ind uscrta! resources of 
Richmond. 



44 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



THOMAS NIXON, 

Manufacturer of Manilla and Imi- 
tation Manilla Paper; J. S. Ostran- 
der, Manager. 

Mr. Thomas Nixon, an extensive owner 
and proprietor of paper mills at Dayton, O., 
and this city, has erected and is now conduct- 
ing under the efficient management of Mr. J. 
S. Ostrander a finely appointed factory on the 
banks of the White Water River, a short dis- 
tance from the city limits, for the manufac- 
ture of manilla and imitation manilla paper. 
The mill at this 'ocation was originally built 
many years ago, but was destroyed by fire in 
1871 and rebuilt upon a more extensive scale 
by Mr. Nixon. The plant covers many acres 
and the main building is a three story brick 
structure 25x60 feet in dimensions, with an 
"L" two stories in height and 25x40 feet in 
size. There are two one story brick buildings 
occupied as machine rooms, one being 25x60 
feet and the other 24x100 feet in size. An- 
other three story brick structure, 40x40 feet in 
size, is used for the assorting department. 
Other buildings are occupied as office, boiler 
and engine rooms, stock rooms, etc. Both 
steam and water power are utilized, the com- 
bined force being rn horse power. An aver- 
age force of 2S operatives is employed in the 
various departments, necessitating the dis- 
bursement of nearly $i,coo per month for the 
item of labor alone. The paper manufactured 
here is shipped to headquarters at Dayton, O., 
where it is manufactured into grocers' bags of 
various sizes, from which point it is distributed 
to various sections of the Union. The Rich- 
mond factory is under the control and man- 
agement of Mr. J. S. Ostrander, an experienced 
paper maker, and to his etficient administration 
may be attributed in a large degree the success 
■which has attended this house. 



RICHMOND BUSINESS COLLEGE & 
TELEGRAPH INSTITUTE, 
John K. Beck & Co., Propr.'s; N. E. 
Cor. Main and Seventh Sts. 
The business colleges of the present day, 
■with their comprehensive systems of educa- 
tion, sustain the same relations to the business 
■world that medical colleges do to medicine, 
law schools to modern jurisprudence or theo- 
logical seminaries to the clerical profession. 
Among the most successful and deservedly 
popular educational institutions of Indiana, 
the Richmond Business College and Tele- 
graph Institute claims prominent recognition, 
having, during a career of nearly a quarter of 
a century, educated and fitted for business life 
hundreds of young ladies and gentlemen, now 
occupying responsible positions or engaged in 
business on their own accounts in the princi- 
pal cities of the Union. This institution dates 
its inception from i860, when it was estab- 
lished by William Purdy, who was succeeded 
two years later by the firm ot Hollingsworth 
& Gundry. In 1S76 the control of the college 
passed into the hands of Prof. John K. Beck, 
■who conducted it successfully until 1S82, 



when Prof. O. E. Fulghum, an experienced 
electrician and telegraph operator and instruc- 
tor, was admitted to an interest in the busi- 
ness. The college and institute is pleasantly 
and eligibly located in the business center of 
the city and occupies the greater portion of 
two floors in the commodious brick structure, 
corner of Main and Seventh Sts., where the 
most ample facilities are enjoyed for the ac- 
commodation of 150 students. The course of 
studies in the commercial department em- 
braces thorough and comprehensive theoretical 
as well as practical instruction in the following 
important brinches: book keeping, single and 
double entry, plain and ornamental penman- 
ship, commercial arithmetic, merchandising, 
political economy, actual business, business 
correspondence, commercial law, insurance, 
banking, importing, forwarding, commission, 
domestic and foreign compound company 
business, manufacturing, railroading, steam- 
boating, joint stock accounts. In the Tele- 
graph Institute is taught everything necessary 
to render pupils proficient in this useful art. 
The proper preparation, nature and uses of the 
chemicals employed, the construction and care 
of the batteries, the use of switches, telegraphic 
book-keeping, making out reports, transmitting 
and receiving accurately and expeditiously by 
sound, and in tact the entire routine," the 
theory and practice of the operators' art. Stu- 
dents of the Institute are also taught penman- 
ship at the College free of charge. The 
Institute is at all times open to visitors. Stu- 
dents can enter either department of this 
College or Institute at any time and the period 
required to complete their education is regu- 
lated solely by their application and capacity, 
diplomas being awarded only to those who are 
deemed thoroughly competent to fill the posi- 
tions for which they have been educated. In 
place of the methods in vogue at some col- 
leges of copying exercises from books, students 
are instructed by means of actual business 
transactions, conducted on a veritable money 
basis, and buy, sell, barter, consign, transact a 
general banking business aud are taught the 
entire routine of every branch of actual busi- 
ness by individual experience as merchants, 
bankers, agents, etc. Prof. John K. Beck, 
upon whom devolves the general manage- 
ment of the subordinate teachers and the 
general control of the business college, has 
had a practical experience of many years as 
an instructor in the special branches of pen- 
manship, book-keeping and commercial law 
and thoroughly comprehends the duties of his 
responsible position. He graduated with hon- 
ors at Grundy's Business College, of Cincin- 
nati, and at Dyrenfarth's Business College, of 
Chicago, and since assuming the manage- 
ment of the Richmond College has added 
additional laurels to its reputation as one of 
the most excellent colleges of its class in the 
Union. Mr. O. E. Fulghum, manager of the 
telegraphic department, has been connected 
with some of the most important offices of the 
leading telegraph lines in the United States. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 



45 



As an operator and electrician he is highly 
endorsed by the leading business houses of 
Richmond. 



JOHNSON & WOODHURST, 

Stoves, Tin and Sheet Iron, etc., No. 
810 Main St. 

One of the leading houses engaged in this 
Important line of business is that of Messrs. 
Johnson & Woodhurst, No. Sio Main St., 
which was originally established many years 
ago by Messrs. Woodhurst & Eckel, who con- 
ducted the business up to 1S72, at which time 
the firm became Johnson, Woodhurst & Co., 
under which style the business was conducted 
up to January, 1SS3, at which time the firm 
name became as at present. The premises 
occupied consist of a spacious and commo- 
dious salesroom 1SX70 leet in size, besides a 
shop for manufacturing pueposes, 25x50 feet in 
dimensions. An average force of eight work- 
men and / assistants are regularly employed 
and the operations of this house embrace the 
manufacture of all kinds of tin, copper and 
sheet iron ware, galvanized iron cornice, 
brackets and window caps, besides doing tin, 
slate and iron roofing and general jobbing of 
all kinds. In their salesroom they carry a 
large variety and extensive stock of healing 
and cooking stoves, ranges, furnaces and all 
kinds of ware pertaining to this branch of 
trade, and are the authorized agents for the 
celebrated "Early Breakfast" cook stoves, 
made by Red way & Burton, of Cincinnati, 
and Kohller's hot air furnaces. The indi- 
I vidual members of the firm are Peter Johnson 
and Theodore Woodhurst. Mr. Johnson is a 
native of New York State but has resided in 
this city for a number of years. He was for- 
merly a member of the firm of Nordyke & 
Johnson and has been identified with this 
branch of trade for over 30 years. Mr. Wood- 
hurst was born in Ohio and has also had 
many years experience in the business. 



three skilled workmen in the custom depart- 
ment, to which special attention is given. 
The quality of material used as well as styles 
and workmanship is guaranteed first class, 
while neat and perfect fits are always assured. 
It is conceded that no house in this depart- 
ment of trade in Eastern Indiana enjoys more 
ample facilities for the successful prosecution 
of trade. Mr. Gilbert, the proprietor of this 
house, is a native of Henry County, this state, 
where he was born in 1S40. He has been en- 
j gaged in his present iine of business in this 
city for a period of 24 years. He is a practical 
shoe man. understanding thoroughly all the 
details of the business. 



J. B. GILBERT, 

Boots and Shoes, No. S20 Main St. 
This is one of the leading houses in its line 
here and was originally established by the 
present proprietor over 16 years ago, and since 
its first inception it has enjoyed an established 
and gradually increasing trade, embracing 
among its patrons many of the best families 
in city and country, transacting at present a 
business that is not surpassed by any similar 
establishment in this section of the state and 
extending throughout Wayne, Union, Jay and 
Randolph counties, Ind., and Preble and 
Darke counties, in Ohio. The salesroom oc- 
cupied is 16x116 feet in size, in a substantial 
brick building, and the stock carried embraces 
a full and complete assortment of ladies', gen- 
tlemen's, misses and children's boots and 
shoes, ruhber goods, etc., of newest styles and 
selected from the best and most reliable job- 
bing houses in the country, while the annual 
sales will reach a very large figure. From six 
to eight assistants are employed, including 



SAMUEL VANSANT, 

Confectionery and Fruits, No. 1127 

Main St. 
This house was first established in 1S77 by 
Mr. George Pioneer and was formerly located 
at No. 35 North Eighth St., shortly after 
which the name was changed to Pioneer & 
Brownell, to whom succeeded Mr. Sol. Davis, 
who was succeeded in turn by Mr. D. L. 
Emeric, from which latter gentleman Mr. 
Samuel Vansant purchased the business in 
1SS3 and soon after removed to his present 
location, where he owns the building and 
grounds, and under his able and efficient man- 
agement it has become an established success 
and enjoys a liberal patronage from the best 
class of citizens. The storeroom is 20x160 
feet in dimensions and is fitted up in metropoli- 
tan style, with ice cream parlors in the rear. 
He carries in stock a fine and superior assort- 
ment of pure French and American confec- 
tionery, foreign and domestic fruits and nuts, 
choice Havana and domestic cigars, tobaccos, 
etc., which find liberal and popular recognition 
from the lovers of those articles. Two com- 
petent assistants are employed by Mr. Van- 
sant, and he manufactures large quantities of 
strictly pure confectionery for his own trade. 
The ice cream parlors are handsomeLy and 
tastefully appointed, affording those facilities 
which are not only worthy of liberal public 
consideration but also the full and extended 
notice here accorded. He also keeps one of 
the fine Arctic soda fountains for supplying 
this delicious beverage during the summer 
months. Mr. Vansant was born in Richmond 
in 1S41 and has been engaged in mercantile 
pursuits for over 20 years. As a business 
man he has secured in a large degree the pub- 
lic confidence. 



NEWTON D. LITTLE, 

Contractor and Builder. 

Among the various industries which have a 
a direct bearing upon the prosperity and pro- 
gressive operations of the country, the occu- 
pation of carpenter and builder holds a 
prominent position. Mr. Newton D. Little is 
a native of Washington County, O., but came 
to this state about four years ago. He learned 
his trade in this city and commenced business 
on his own account in tS$3. He is a prac- 



46 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



tical carpenter and builder and is prepared to 
take contracts for every description of work in 
this line and also does all kinds of job work'in 
this department, guaranteeing promptness and 
efficiency. H\> facilities enable him to com- 
pete with any house in the city in quality of 
work and prices. 



A. J. PICKETT, 

Real Estate and Loan' Bro"ker, No. 4 

South Eighth St. 
Mr. Pickett is a native of this city and was 
born here in 1S40. His early life was spent in 
agricultural pursuits, which he subsequently 
abandoned to engage in his present business, 
which he established in this city in connection 
with Mr. Peter P. Kirn, the present County 
Treasurer, in 1S79. At the election of Mr. 
Kirn he established an office on his own ac- 
count in his present location, where his trans- 
actions have gradually grown in magnitude 
and scope until the amount of business trans- 
acted will aggregate between $500,000 and 
$600,000 annually, including the value of 
property and real estate handled. He controls 
the sa'e of valuable farms in this and other 
states, town lots, etc., and gives special atten- 
tion to rent collections, the payment of taxes 
for non-residents and to loans upon real estate 
security. He occupies a commodious and 
tastefully furnished office, located at No. 4 
South Eighth St., and his many years of ex- 
perience in ihis branch of business cannot fail 
to secure for him liberal public consideration 
for those interested in buying or selling real 
estate, desiring to negotiate loans or to avail 
themselves of the facilities he enjoys in other 
departments of his business. Mr. Pickett's 
father, Benjamin Picketts, came to this 
county from North Carolina, January 1st, 1S0S. 
At that time there was but one place where 
goods were sold, by old John Smith, 
whose store was a little low cabin and 
the counter was boards on barrels. Mr. P. 
resided in this county up to the time of his 
death, in his ySth year. 

G. W. RUSSELL & CO., 

Livery and Boarding Stable, Nos. 15 

and 17 South Ninth St. 
This well known and popular establishment 
was inaugurated in the year 1870 by Mr. T. B. 
French and in the course of time passed into 
the hands of Mr. Henry Hiatt, to whom suc- 
ceeded the present firm in 1SS0. The building 
occupied is a fine two story structure, 47x154 
feet in dimensions, can accommodate 60 horses 
at one time and is one of the n.ost perfectly 
arranged stables in the state. Besides a 
general office on the south side.it has a ladies' 
waiting room on the north side. The present 
firm, since taking possession, has made many 
remarkable improvements, until at the present 
the stable is one of the leading institutions of 
the kind in Eastern Indiana. Ten horses, all 
first class roadsters, besides a number ot fine 
top and open single and double buggies and 
carriages, are kept for livery purposes, together 



with a select variety of fine carriages, which 
can be had at any hour of the day or night. 
Four experienced hands are regularly em- 
ployed and horses are boarded at the" most 
reasonable rates, the best of care and attention 
being paid to them, Mr. Russell giving his 
personal supervision to this department of the 
business. Carriages are supplied for parties, 
festivals or funeral occasions and traveling 
men conveyed to distant points on reasonable 
terms. The stables are among the largest in 
the city and the liberal patronage thev enjoy 
will aggregate about $i2,coo. Mr. Russell, 
the senior member of the firm, is an experi- 
enced horseiran and was born in Chester 
County, Pa., in 1S2S, coming to this citv in 1S5S. 



J. A. CUNNINGHAM & SON. 

Boots and Shoes, No. 529 Main St. 
There is no house in the city in this line 
that has established a better record, either as 
to quality or price, than that of Mr. J. A. Cun- 
ningham, located at No. 529 Main St. Mr. 
Cunningham has been engaged in this trade 
since 1S6S and in his present commodious and 
centrally located quarters since 1S75, and dur- 
ing the long intervening period since that 
date has enjoyed a very successful and lucra- 
tive trade, his aggregate sales at present aver- 
aging from $25,000 to $50,000. Mr. Cunning- 
ham conducted the business alone up to 
January 1st, 1SS4, at which time his son, 
Joseph \V. Cunningham, was admitted to 
partnership and the present firm name adopted. 
The premises occupied embrace a fine business 
room 23x125 feet in dimensions, in which is 
carried a large and extensive stock of the best 
styles and makes of boots and shoes for ladies, 
gentlemen and children's wear. His facilities 
for securing his supplies from the best and 
most reliable manufacturers and jobbers in 
the country is not surpassed by any contem- 
poraneous house East or West. From two to 
four assistants are employed and the trans- 
actions of this house will "bear favorable com- 
parison in amount with any similar house in 
this section ot the state. Mr. J. A. Cunning- 
ham, the proprietor of this house, is a native 
of England, where he was born in 1S33. He 
was formerly engaged in busines in this city 
with other parties. The honorable and 
straightforward policy which characterizes the 
business operations of this house, as well as 
the extent of its commercial operations, justly 
entitles it to the full and liberal notice here 
accorded in a review of the commercial and 
industrial operations of this city and state. 



LOUIS RUNGE & SON, 

Flour and Feed, 14 N. Seventh St. 
This house was established by the present 
proprietors about five years ago, since which 
time it has enjoyed a trade that will compare 
favorably with "that of any similar establish- 
ment in the citv. The premises embrace a 
commodious salesroom, -0x75 feet in size, 
where can be found an excellent stock of the 
leading brands of choice family fiour, grain, 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 



47 



meal and feed, baled hay and straw. This | 
firm enjoys the amplest facilities for procuring I 
fresh supplies from first hands and keeping I 
their stock always well aborted. One wagon [ 
is kept for the prompt delivery of goods to 
patrons in all parts of the city, and the trade 
of the house extends to all parts of the city ] 
and surrounding country. The individual 
members of the firm are Louis Runge and 
John Runge. Mr. Louis Runge was born in 
Germany in 1S29 and John, his sor., in Rich- 
mond in iS^3 Both gentlemen are active, 
enterprising business men and prompt and 
reliable in all their dealings. 



PETER HUSSON, 

Union Bakery and Restaurant, No. 
823 Main St. 

Among the industrial occupations of this 
city worthy of special mention is the bakery 
and lunch room of Mr. Peter Husson, located 
at No. S23 Main St. This gentleman first 
started in business here in company with 
Everett L. Davis, and afterward with Mr. 
Landwehr, in 1SS2, under the firm name of 
Husson & Co., which continued for about 
eight months, when the co-partnership was 
dissolved, Mr. Husson taking sole charge of 
the business. Under his able and judicious 
management the business has grown rapidly, 
until the house now ranks among the first of 
its class in the city and is the leading one 
In this line, transacting an annual business of 
about $44,000. Mr. Husson employs seven 
experienced assistants, and by securing the 
best quality of flour and furnishing his patrons 
•with excellent bread, rolls, pies, cakes, etc., his 
establishment has rapidly grown in trade and 
popularity. In addition to supplying families 
with choice bread, rolls, cakes, etc., he is pre- 
pared to furnish fine pyramid and other fancy 
cakes to order for weddings, parties or festival 
occasions. A lunch room and regular dining 
room are attached to the bakery, where patrons 
and the public can always satisfy their wants 
with lunch or -warm meals. Regular day 
boarders are taken at liberal rates. Mr. Hus- 
son was born in Germany in 1S52 and came to 
the United States in 1S71. He has been a 
resident of Richmond since 1S77, and having 
established a large and lucrative trade, has be- 
come thoroughly identified with the business 
interests of this city and vicinity. 

CHARLES S. FARNHAM, 

Dealer in Lumber, Southwest Cor- 
ner Tenth and North E Sts. 
Possessing facilities unsurpassed by those of 
any contemporaneous establishment of its 
kind in the city, the house of Mr. Charles S. 
Farnham is entitled to a large degree of con- 
sideration in a review of the representative 
commercial institutions of this city and state. 
This establishment had its origin some years 
ago by Mr. Benjamin Johnson, who was suc- 
ceeded by the firm of Hopkins & Farnham, 
under whose management it continued until 
1S77, when Mr. Hopkins retired and the pres- 



ent proprietor assumed the entire control- 
The office and yard room at the above named 
location embraces an area of 2:0x150 feet, 
where an immense stock of about 1 ,000,000 
feet of lumber is kept constantly on hand, in- 
cluding both rou^h and dressed lumber, heavy 
framing timbers, fencing posts, flooring, siding, 
shingles, laths, doors, frames, sash, blinds etc. 
In the busy season from six to ten hands ire 
regularly employed and the trade of this house 
extend- throughout this city a-nd the adj 
towns within a radius of ^6 miles. Mr. Farn- 
ham is a native of New York, where he was 
born in 1S41. He has been a resident of Rich 
mond for the past iS years, during the greater 
portion of which time he has been engaged in 
this branch of commercial enterprise. 

S. R. LIPPINCOTT, 

Undertaker and Funeral Director, 
Office and Residence, No. 20 North 
Ninth St. 
This gentleman established himself at his 
present location, No. 20 North Ninth St., 
about five years ago and gives prompt per- 
sonal attention to all the requirements of this 
department, in which he has secured liberal 
public consideration. The rooms occupied by 
him for business purposes are 1SX65 feet in 
dimensions and his office and storerooms are 
finely furnished and stocked with every desira- 
ble variety of wood and metalic coffins and 
caskets and every description of undertakers' 
supplies, giving to this house a position among 
the leading houses of its kind in Eastern Indi- 
ana and Western Ohio. Two hearses are 
employed and Mr. Lippincott will personally 
superintend all matters pertaining to funeral 
occasions, according to the wishes of friends 
of the deceased, in city or country. His skill 
as an embalmer will be tound unsurpassed 
and it is a noticeable fact that he was the first 
in this city to dispense with the use of ice in 
preserving bodies. He keeps on hand or will 
furnish promptly to order fine floral designs, 
constructed in "all popular methods. In all 
departments of the business he keeps pace 
with the progressive spirit of the age, intro- 
ducing all efficient and desirable improve- 
ments. Mr. Lippincott is a native of Phila- 
delphia, where he was born in 1S46. He has 
been a resident of Indiana for nearly half a 
century and was formerly engaged in the 
manufacture of carriages and is widely known 
in various sections of the state. He has been 
associated with the business interests of this 
city for more than 40 years and was at one 
time appointed special agent by the Census 
Commissioner to take the census of this city, 
which office he most efficiently filled. The 
National Funeral Directors' Association, which 
extends over the entire country, elect- 
ed Mr. Lippincott Secretary of its first organi- 
zation and the Indiana State Funeral Directors' 
Association also selected him for the same 
office, both of which he has filled in an able 
and highly satisfactory manner, and is still 
holding his positions. 



43 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



GEORGE H. EGGEMEYER, 

Sewer Pipe, Coal, Wood, Lime, Plas- 
ter, Hair, Cement, etc., 190, 192 and 
194 Ft. Wayne Ave. 

The house now controlled by Mr. George 
H. Eggemeyer had its origin over 15 years 
ago, at which time it was conducted by Mr. 
George W. Simmons, who was succeeded in 
1876 by the firm of J. B. Howes & Co., by 
whom the business was continued up to 1SS1, 
at which time the business came into the 
hands of its present proprietor. The premises 
occupied for offices, buildings, sheds and 
ground space at the above named location 
embrace an area of 110x210 feet, with switch 
connections from the P. C. & St. L. R. R., 
supplying their yards with unsurpassed rail- 
road and shipping facilities. During the busy- 
season an average force of from six to nine 
carts and wagons are employed for delivering 
and business purposes, disposing of an average 
of over 4,000 tons of coal and 2,000 cords of 
wood per annum, in addition to his extensive 
operations in lime, cement, sewer pipe, plas- 
terers' hair, etc. The facilities enjoyed by this 
house for procuring supplies from the best and 
most desirable sources are not surpassed in 
the articles of coal, wood and lime, while in 
sewer pipe Mr. Eggemeyer may justly claim 
superior advantages in supplying this com- 
munity. He is the authorized agent in this 
city for N. U. Walker's Sewer Pipe Works, of 
Wellsville, O., and for the celebrated Buffalo 
Cement Works, of Buffalo, N. Y., and in these 
articles he is able to quote manufacturers' 
prices. During the past season 12 car loads of 
sewer pipe were shipped to this house from 
Wellsville within a period of two months and 
Mr. Eggemeyer has secured many important 
contracts for sewer pipe in this city and else- 
-where. Mr. Eggemeyer is a native of this 
city, where he was born in 1S53, and the 
greater part of his business life has been iden- 
tified with its commercial operations and pro- 
gressive industries. 



WILLIAM H. TRINDLE, 

Staple and Fancy Groceries, 123S 
Main St. 
This house, which occupies a leading posi- 
tion among enterprises of its kind here, had 
its origin in 1SS2, at which time the business 
■was commenced by Mr. T. L. Coblentz, by 
•whom it was conducted up to December, 1SS3, 
at which time it passed into the hands of the 
present proprietor. The premises occupied 
for business purposes embrace a room 1SX50 
teet in dimensions, besides basement, and is 
fitted up in metropolitan style, embracing in 
stock the best grades and varieties of table and 
culinary supplies pertaining to this department 
of trade. The facilities enjoyed by this house 
for receiving supplies trom producers and the 
best jobbing houses in the country are not sur- 
passed by any contemporaneous establishment 
in Eastern Indiana, while its variety is kept 
always fresh by almost daily receipts. From 
one to two assistants are employed and two 



horses and wagon for the prompt delivery of 
goods to patrons in any part of the city. Tele- 
phonic connection is enjoyed with all parts of 
the city and adjoining towns. Mr. W. H. 
Trindle, the proprietor of this house, is a 
native of this state and city, where he was 
born in September, 1S49. Shortly after com- 
pleting his literary education he became asso- 
ciated with office work and for a period ot 
eight years held the position'of Deputy Sheriff. 
The efficiency with which his duties in this 
position were performed, as well as the popu- 
larity he enjoyed throughout the county, are 
sufficiently indicated in the fact that he was 
selected by his fellow citizens to fill the office 
of Sheriff of Wayne County, being elected by 
a large majority in 1S7S and re-elected in 1SS0, 
his second term expiring in December, 1SS2. 

HENRY LURING, 

With McFarlan Carriage Company, 
Braxcm Wareroom, 51 North Eighth 
St., one Door South of Post Office. 
This business was started about three years 
ago by Mr. Luring, he acting in the capacity 
of general agent for the McFarlan Carriage 
Company, makers of the celebrated Conners- 
ville carriages, which have gained such a repu- 
tation throughout the WesL He occupies for 
repository purposes a spacious and conveni- 
ently arranged salesroom, 24x90 feet in dimen- 
sions, where he keeps constantly on hand a 
fine assortment of light and heavy carriages 
of superior quality and finish, any style of 
which can be had that may be desired. Mr. 
Luring employs four sub-agents, and about 
150 vehicles are disposed of annually, the trade 
being confined chiefly to Richmond and 
vicinity. Mr. Luring was born in 1832 and 
has been a resident of Indiana for the past 35 
years. He is a practical mechanic himself in 
this line and at his establishment the buyer is 
afforded facilities r unequaled both in quality 
and price of work, for the selection of almost 
any style of vehicle. 

GEORGE C. McCULLOUGH, 

Watches, Clocks and Jewelry, No. 7 

North Eighth St. 
Among the prominent houses in this city 
engaged in the jewelrv business, the establish- 
ment of Mr. George C. McCullough is entitled 
to honorable mention. This gentleman is a 
native of Richmond and was born in 1S53. 
About 16 years ago he started in business in 
this city repairing watches and jewelry, in 
front of a show window on Main St., and by 
close attention to business, strict economy and 
good workmanship he has succeeded in build- 
ing up a very prosperous business, carrying an 
extensive and well selected stock, noted for its 
variety and superior quality, embracing alF 
manner of adornments in the line of fine jew- 
elry, besides gold and silver ware of chaste 
and elegant designs. A specialty is also made 
of a fine line of gold and silver watches of the 
most approved workmanship and celebrated 
manufacturers, both foreign and American. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 



49 



Mr. McCuIIough pays carefu! attention to fine 
•watch, clock, jewelry and complicated music 
box repairing, giving it his personal supervi- 
sion and guaranteeing perfect satisfaction. He 
occupies a handsomely arranged salesroom 
20x45 feet in dimensions, carries a stock valued 
at $2,500 and transacts an annual business of 
$5,000. Two assistants are employed by him 
and the promptness and reliability that char- 
acterizes all his transactions fully entitle* him 
to prominent position among the leading jew- 
elry houses of Richmond. 



WILLIAM H. SUDHOFF, 

Druggist and Apothecary, South- 
west Corner Main and Fifth Sts. 
This popular pharmacy is the oldest stand 
in the city, having been established over 50 
years ago, and was taken possession of by Mr. 
Sudhoff in 1SS1, since which time that gentle- 
man has continued to maintain the popularity 
of the, house by the honorable manner in 
which he conducts the business. The stock 
carried embraces the purest and freshest drugs 
and chemicals, the leading and standard varie- 
ties of proprietary medicines, pure wines and 
liquors for medicinal purposes, toilet articles, 
fancy soaps, imported and American perfumer- 
ies, sponges, brushes, combs, surgical appli- 
ances, choice cigars and druggists' sundries 
generally. Special attention is devoted to the 
compounding of physicians' prescriptions and 
family recipes, this feature constituting no 
unimportant factor of the flourishing trade of 
the house. The salesroom is 20x55 feet in 
dimensions and has recently been repaired and 
fitted up throughout, presenting an attractive 
appearance. The stock carried is valued at 
$3,500. Two experienced clerks are employed 
and a trade amounting to SiS,ooois transacted 
annually. Mr. Sudhoff is a native of this city 
and was born in 1855. He was for some time 
a salesman in Dr. Muller's drug store, in this 
city, and studied pharmacy at the Cincinnati 
College of Pharmacy, from which institution 
he was graduated in 1S79. After graduating 
he was engaged as prescription clerk in Lip- 
pert's drug store, Cincinnati, which position he 
held up to the time of establishing himself in 
business in this city. He is a competent drug- 
gist and enjoys in a marked degree the confi- 
dence of the medical fraternity and citizens of 
Richmond and vicinity. 



T. F. MORGAN & SON, 

Plumbers, Pump, Steam and Gas Fit- 
ters, No. 18 North Ninth St. 
This house was established by Mr. T. F. 
Morgan in 1S69 and is one of the best known 
of the kind in Richmond, the proprietors 
taansacting an annual business of about $10,- 
000, which is steadily on the increase. The 
building occupied by Mr. Morgan is a sub- 
stantial business structure, two stories in 
height and 100x22 feet in dimensions, every 
part of which is utilized for manufacturing and 
storage purposes. Mr. Morgan employs three 
practical and experienced artizans and trans- 



acts a general business in plumbing, steam 
and gas fitting, etc., making a specialty of sani- 
tary plumbing and steam heating apparatus 
for public and private buildings. He carries 
in stock a general line of steam and gas fix- 
tures, copper, wrought and cast iron pipe of 
all sizes, steam, lift, force and chain pumps, 
lead, iron and block tin, iron sinks, water 
closets, etc., and all kinds of heating-apparatus. 
Mr. Morgan was born in Philadelphia in 1S30- 
and previous to coming to this city was en- 
gaged in business in Cincinnati, where he 
served an apprenticeship and worked at the 
business for three and a half vears. His son, 
Franklin T Morgan, was admitted to partner- 
ship, March ist, 1SS4. He is also a practical 
plumber and understands the details of the 
business. 



J. O. BARBER. 

Special Agent Northwestern Mu- 
tual Life Insurance Company, Room 
No. 2, Over Second National Bank. 
The insurance agency of Mr. J. O. Barber is 
entitled to prominent recognition on account 
of the long experience and successful career of 
its manager and of the uniformly high stand- 
ing of the company whose interests he repre- 
sents in this city. Mr. Barber has been a 
resident of Richmond tor the past 17 years,, 
during the last five of which he has repre- 
sented the Northwestern Insurance Company, 
of Milwaukee, Wis., whose total assets are at 
present over $21,000,000, and including ton- 
tine surplus, is the strongest of the five largest 
American mutual life insurance companies, as 
shown by the ratio of surplus to liabilities. 
For the past nine years this company has paid 
its expenses, taxes and death claims from its 
interest income alone — a record which no 
other company can at the present time show. 
Mr. Barber is also prepared to secure first 
mortgage loans on real estate on reasonable 
terms. The uniformly correct and honorable 
business methods which have characterized 
the transactions of Mr. Barber have largely 
contributed to the efficiency of his operations 
and the large and growing patronage he en- 
joys. For full particulars in regard to rates or 
agency apply to above address. 






MRS. A. P. COLE, 

Millinery, No. iS North Eighth St. 
Mrs. Cole occupies for business purposes a 
large and commodious salesroom on North 
Eighth St., which is at all times kept liberallv 
stocked with most desirable and seasonable 
goods, selected with great care and in direct 
reference to the market. Special pains are 
taken to secure each season the newest novel- 
ties in patterns, hats and bonnets simultane- 
ously with their appearance in our metropoli- 
tan cities, also ribbons, trimmings, flowers, 
feathers and general millinery supplies. She 
enjoys the amplest facilities for securing sup- 
plies and employs a competent force of experi- 
enced trimmers. Mrs. Cole was formerly 
engaged in business in the city of Indianapolis 



50 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



but removed to Terre Haute, coming from 
there to this city in 1SS1, where she started at 
her present location, over two years ago. 
Here her etlbrts to secure the better class of 
trade have been rewarded with marked suc- 
cess in a gradually increasing trade, extending 
not only through tlrs city but drawing largely 
from adjoining counties in Eastern Indiana 
and the counties of Preble and Darke, in Ohio. 
The trade of this house has grown to such 
proportions that during the bu-y seasons of 
the year the employment of from six to eight 
skilled milliners is required. Mrs. Cole is a 
native of this state and has enjoyed a long and 
thorough experience in this business. 



B. ARNOLD, 

Ladies' Furnishing Goons, Notions, 

etc., No. 70S Main St. 
Among the representative business houses 
of this city, none enjov a more liberal share of 
the public consideration than that conducted 
by Mr. B. Arnold, whose spacious and conve- 
niently arranged salesroom is stocked to its 
utmost capacity with an admirably selected 
assortment of ladies' furnishing goods, in- 
cluding all the latest and most fashionable 
fabrics and styles, together with an extensive 
line of general notions, etc., pertaining to this 
important department of trade. Mr. Arnold 
occupies for sales purpose one floor, iSxoo 
feet in size, and employs an average of four 
assistants. He manufactures hosiery and 
hoopskirts in large quantities and variety for 
his own trade only and transacts an annual 
business of about $25,000, his trade extending 
throughout the city and surrounding country. 
Mr. Arnold is a native of Germany, where he 
•was born in 1S35. He came to America over 
30 years ago and has been establisned at his 
present location for 13 years, during the whole 
of which period he secured a liberal patronage 
from the better class of trade. 



PHILIP SCHNEIDER, 

Carriage Manufacturer, No. 9 South 

Sixth St. 
Richmond has taken a conspicuous place 
in the manufacture of the better quality of 
carriages, a prominent feature being the ab- 
sence of any cheap or shoddy work. The 
leading manufacturer in this branch of trade 
in Richmond is undoubtedly Mr. Philip 
Schneider, locates at No. 9 South Sixth St., 
conducted by him since 1S77, he having suc- 
ceeded a Mr. S. R. Lippincot in that year. 
The main building of the establishment is a 
two story brick structure, 40x80 feet, in which 
are located the paint shop, wood working 
department, blacksmith shop, finishing rooms, 
etc. The warehouse, which is 35x35 feet, two 
stories high, is used tor storing finished work. 
In another three story brick building 35XS5 
feet, are situated the trimming department and 
repository, in which a large stock of first class 
finished work is constantly carried. Twenty- 
five skilled mechanics are employed and every 
variety of light and heavy carriages, phaetons, 



spring wagons, etc., are turned out, the trade 
in which reaches an aggregate of $40,000 
yearly. Nothing but first class work is turned 
out and the works are supplied with all neces- 
sary and improved devices, tools and imple- 
ments for successfully carrying on the 
extensive business. Mr. Schneider was born 
in Germany in 1S40 and emigrated to America 
in 1S47. He first began business in Rich- 
mond in 1S60 and has been a resident of the 
city ever since. He gives his personal atten- 
tion to alhthe various details of the business 
and by his industry and enterprise has achieved 
an honorable position for himself in this city. 



E. P. DENNISON, 

The Leading Hatter and Gents' 
Furnisher, No. 716 Main St. 
This house was established by the present 
proprietor over 13 years ago, whose trade, ex- 
tending throughout the city and adjoining 
country, amounts to about $15,000 per annum. 
Mr. Dennison is the leading hatter of this 
city and his stock in this line comprises all the 
latest and most fashionable styles of hats, 
which are received promptly on their appear- 
ance in our metropolitan cities. Fine silk, 
fine felt and straw hats of all desirable varie- 
ties comprise the stock. He also carries a 
large and comprehensive assortment of gentle- 
men's furnishing goods, fine shirts, underwear 
and making a specialty of fine neckwear. His 
salesroom, iSxioo feet, is most tastefully ar- 
ranged and from one to three experienced 
salesmen are employed. He makes a specialty 
of manufacturing shirts to order, in which 
this house guarantees quality, price and fits, 
turning out about 1,000 of these articles an- 
nually. Mr. Dennison is a native of Connec- 
ticut and has been a resident of Richmond for 
the past 14 years, building up a flourishing 
and lucrative trade and establishing an envia- 
ble reputation. 

C. W. STONE, 

Cigars and Tobacco, No. 623 Main St. 
The cigar and tobacco business as trans- 
acted in our principal cities is of great impor- 
tance to our national industrial life, furnishing 
a stimulus to agricultural pursuits in the culti- 
vation of a crop that is the staple product of 
many counties, and even states, and which 
may now be appropriately classed among the 
actual necessities rather than the luxuries of 
life. Extensively engaged in this important 
department of industrial enterprise in this city 
is Mr. C. W. Stone, who established himself 
in this business at his present location, No. 
623 Main St., as recently as the beginning of 
the present year and already transacts a trade 
aggregating $S,ooo per annum. He carries a 
large and varied stock of plug, fine cut, twist, 
navy and other kinds of chewing tobacco; all 
the leading brands of imported and domestic 
cigars, smoking tobaccos, cigarettes, pipes, 
snuff and smokers' articles generally. The 
salesroom is a spacious one and finely ar- 
ranged and two assistants are regularly 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 



51 



employed. Mr. Slone is a native of Ohio and 
was born in 1S61. He has been engaged in 
this line of business >ince iSSo and by present 
appearances undoubtedly has a bright busi- 
ness career before him. 



HERMAN SHOFER, 

Livery, Feed and Sale Stable, Cor. 

Sixth and South E Sts. 
This establishment was founded in iS6^ by 
the present proprietor, through whose energy 
and thorough adaptation to the business it has 
reached its present prosperous condition. The 
premises occupied embrace a tine two story 
.brick building, Sox 135 teet in dimensions, 
where about 70 horses can be accommodated 
in a very superior manner. Five expeiienced 
hands are employed and the best of care and 
attention is given to all animals entrusted to 
the charge of Mr. Shofcr, as he gives his per- 
sonal supervision to the business, and boards 
horses by the feed, day or week at the most 
reasonable rates. Twelve excellent horses 
are kept for livery purposes and the annual 
amount of business transacted aggregates be- 
tween $25,000 and $30,000. Mr. Shofer was 
born in Germany in 1843, but soon after that 
event, in. the following year, he removed to 
America, coming direct to Richmond, where 
he has ever since resided. He is one of the 
most successful business men in the city, 
■which is chietiy owing to the fact that his rep- 
resentations can at all times be relied upon. 
He buys and sells a great many horses during 
the course of the year and his honorable mode 
of dealing has won him the esteem and confi- 
dence of all classes. 



W. J. SMITH, 

Surgical Appliances, iS N. Fifth St. 

Mr. Smith was born in Ohio in 1S44 but has 

resided in this state the greater part of his life. 

The premises occupied by him are 1SX3S feet 

in dimensions, and here he performs all his 

■work, his being the only establishment of the 
Tcind in the city. He opened at his present 
place of business in 1S76 and his skill and 

-facilities have been attested by the large and 
increasing trade which he enjoys, extending 

■over Indiana, Ohio, Illinois, Missouri, Califor- 
nia and Virginia. He has made many impor- 
tant and valuable improvements in surgical 

.appliances and presents not only the natural 
adaptation and ingenuity for the prosecution 

■of his business, but that theoretical and practi- 
cal experience which guarantees the execution 
of every description of work in that finished 

.and perfect manner which will bear the most 
critical inspection and comparison with that 
of any other establishment in the country. 
He manufactures appliances for correction of 
all physical deformities, such as paralysis, 
curvatures of the spine, club feet, weak ankles, 
knock knees, bow legs, hip disease, contracted 

•cords, stiff* joints, weak spine and all other 
cases requiring mechanical support. He also 
manufactures apparatus for special cases, 
when designs are furnished, thereby saving 



the patient the trouble and expense of going 
to a surgical institute to have their work done. 
In addition to this Mr. Smith also makes to 
order stencil plates, steel stamps, rubber 
stamps, burning brands, etc., guaranteeing his 
work in all cases to fulfill trie requirements <A~ 
patrons according to representations. 

DR. A. BOPPART, 
No. 925 Main St. 
The popular pharmacy and drug store con- 
ducted by Dr. A. Boppart, at No. 925 Main 
St.. was established in 1S6S and enjoys in a 
marked degree the confidence of the medical 
fraternity and the citizens of Richmond and 
vicinity. The salesroom is 20x41 teet in 
dimensions and is handsomely fitted up in 
modern style. The stock embraces the purest 
and freshest dru-js and chemicals, the leading 
and standard proprietary medicines, toilet 
articles, fancy scraps, imported and American 
perfumeries, sponges, brushes, comb-, surgical 
appliances and druggists' sundries generally. 
Special attention is devoted to the compound- 
ing of physicians' prescriptions and tamily 
recipes, this feature constituting no unimpor- 
tant factor of the flourishing trade of the house, 
which amounts to about $2o,coo yearly and is 
gradually increasing. Dr. Boppart is a native 
of Switzerland, where he was born in 1S35, 
and came to this country in 1S5S. He clerked 
in a New York house for about a year after 
his arrival and then went to Newport, Ky., 
where he remained for nine years, finally re- 
moving to this city and establishing himself 
in business here in' 1S6S. He is an educated 
and accomplished chemist and pharmacist of 
many years experience. 



NYE'S CHINA PALACE, 

Ralph W. Nye, Prop., 719 Main St., 

Westcott Block. 
This old and retiable house had its origin in 
this city over 10 years ago, having been estab- 
lished by its present energetic proprietor in 
1S73, and has for a number of years been 
located at S30 Main St., where the business 
was conducted up to the latter part of Feb- 
ruary, 1SS4, when it was removed to its pres- 
ent location. Mr. Nye has one of the finest 
business blocks in the city. The premises 
here occupied for storage and business pur- 
poses embrace a general salesroom 20x100 feet 
in dimensions, besides basement of same 
dimensions for storage purposes. The trans- 
actions of this house embrace both wholesale 
and retail departments and the facilities en- 
joyed by Mr. Nye enable him to procure his 
supplies direct from importers, manufacturers 
and first hands upon such terms as will pre- 
sent the strongest inducements to the trade. 
The stocks carried embrace full and complete 
lines of French china and American queens- 
ware, glassware, lamps and chandeliers. Ma- 
jolica and Dresden novelties, table and pocket 
cutlery, statuary and shelf ornaments, etc. 
He controls as agent the '-Monitor" oil stoves 
and "Alaska" refrigerators. In addition to the 



52 



STATE OF INDIANA, 



large and growing retail trade, embracing both 
city and adjacent towns and country, this 
house is prepared to extend its jobbing trade 
and present stronger inducements than ever 
before to dealers in Eastern Indiana and West- 
ern Ohio. Mr. Nye, the proprietor of this 
house, is a native of Franklin County, this 
state, but came to this city over a quarter of a 
century ago. He first became associated with 
the commercial enterprises of this city as a 
partner in the firm of Ezra Nye & Bro., in 
1866, in stoves, tinware and house supplies, 
in which business he continued up to 1S73, at 
-which time he engaged in his present enterprise. 



FRANK W. SPINNING, 

Flour and Fied, 13 North Ninth St. 
Mr. Spinning established himself in his 
present location on the 31st of January, 1SS3, 
and in the brief period intervening has acquired 
a popularity and trade which bids fair to out- 
strip his older contemporaries and will com- 
pare favorably with older houses of its class in 
this city. Mr. Spinning occupies for business 
purposes the whole of a substantial brick 
building, 40x32 feet in dimensions, where he 
keeps constantly in stock all leading brands 
of choice family flour, besides feed of all kinds, 
baled hay, straw, etc. He also keeps a wagon 
for the prompt delivery of goods to patrons in 
all parts of the city. Two assistants are usu- 
ally employed and the trade of the house has 
been increasing until at present the amount of 
business transacted is about $7,000 per annum. 
Telephonic connection is enjoyed with all 
parts of the city and adjoining towns. Mr. 
Spinning is a native of this city, where he was 
born in 1S54. He has had several years ex- 
perience in this line of business before com- 
mencing for himself. The prompt and correct 
business policy which has- characterized the 
transactions of this house has largely contri- 
buted to its popularity and the growing trade 
it deservedly enjoys. 



J. C. HOLLOPETER, 

Manufacturer of Marbleazeo Enam- 
eled Si.ate and Iron Mantles and 
Enameled Grates, etc., Factory and 
Salesroom, 426 Main St. 
The facilities enjoyed by Mr. Hollopeter are 
such as to enable him to supply promptly to 
order any desired design or style of marbleized 
slate or iron mantles, which he will guarantee 
to be unsurpassed in excellence and beauty of 
style and finish by any contemporaneous 
house in the Union and at equally low prices. 
Popular designs and styles of finished man- 
tles and grate- are always kept in stock. His 
ovens are constructed upon the most approved 
plan known to the art, and as a practical mar- 
bleizer who has made himself thoroughly 
familiar with this art, Mr. Hollopeter is able 
to establish his claim to recognition bv the 
recognized excellence, beauty and solidity of 
his work. The establishment of a manufac- 
tory of this class in this city is a source of 
pride to the citizens and cannot fail to secure 



precedence over foreign makes, especially 
when equal merit attaches to home works- 
Mr. Hollopeter started his present enter- 
prise in November, 18S3, at No. 426 Main St.,. 
where his manufactory and salesroom occupy 
a brick structure 20xSo feet and where his 
facilities for meeting the public demand must 
ensure liberal public consideration. He is 
also agent for both Hackett's and Wallaces- 
patent grates, which are supplied upon as rea- 
sonable terms as could be obtained of the 
manufacturers. He is also agent for the Indi- 
anapolis Tile Works. 

[We are indebted to Mr. J. C. Hollopeter 
for use of Richmond Directory of 1S57. — Ed.J 



D. THOMPSON, 

Dealer in Sewing Machines, Main St. 
A good sewing machine has become an 
absolute necessity in every household, and 
there is no better place in Richmond to pur- 
chase one of these indispensable articles than? 
at the sewing machine depot of Mr. D- 
Thompson, on Main St., whose facilities are 
unsurpassed by any dealer in these articles in- 
the West. In a large and commodious sales- 
room, 20x100 feet in size, at the above named 
location, Mr. Thompson keeps in stock all the 
leading and popular machines, which he buys 
outright for cash and sells for cash, thereby 
being in a position to offer inducements to 
purchasers in the majority of cases, which the 
regular agents of these same machines cannot 
approach. He employs one assistant and dis- 
poses of about 150 machines annually, the 
"New Home'' leading all competitors and- 
having the largest sale and most popular de- 
mand. Mr. Thompson was born in Hamilton 
County, O., and has been a resident of Rich- 
mond 24 years, during the whole of which 
period he has been engaged in the' sewing 
machine business. He is endowed with en- 
ergy, push and the requisite qualifications for 
business in the field in which he has been so* 
eminently successful. 



H. M. MILLER, 

Millinery, etc., 39 North Eighth St. 
This well known house was established in 
187 1 and during the years of its existence has 
been constantly growing in favor with the 
public, until it has at length become the lead- 
ing fashionable millinery emporium in the 
city. This result has been obtained through 
the fullest advantages enjoyed in securing 
supplies from the leading manufacturers, im- 
porters and jobbers in our metropolitan cities 
and the promptness with which she receives 
newest pattern hats and bonnets upon their 
appearance in the East, with newest novelties 
in every department, while the trimming 
department is presided over by accomplished 
artists of taste and experience and special at- 
tention given to the adaptation of colors and 
styles to the wearer. The salesroom is a com- 
modious one, 25XS5 feet in size, tastefully 
appointed and fitted up in a style which will 
compare favorably with leading establishments- 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 



53 



in our metropolitan cities. From six to nine 
skillful and experienced milliners are em- 
ployed, according to the demands of the sea- 
son, and this millinery emporium draws a 
large share of its patronage from the better 
class of citizens in both city and country. 

HARMAN FETTA, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 
Cigars, Smoking and Chewing To- 
baccos, Smokers' Articles, etc., Cor. 
Ft. Wayne Ave. and Eighth St. 
Among the prominent cigar and tobacco 
houses of Richmond worthy of special notice, 
is that of Mr. Harman Fetta, located at the 
corner of Ft. Wayne Ave. and Eighth St., in 
close proximity to the Union Depot. This 
house was first established about 17 years ago, 
•the present proprietor coming into possession 
of the business six years ago, succeeding his 
brother, Mr. Louis Fetta, who is still an active 
worker in the hou^. Formerly engaged in 
manufacturing, this department of the busi- 
ness was abandoned and the operations con- 
fined, entirely to the wholesale and retail 
business. The stock carried embraces one of 
the largest and fullest varieties of best and 
most popular brands of choice Havana and 
■domestic cigars, smoking and chewing tobacco 
and a complete line of smokers' articles to be 
found in this city, and this house, through the 
superior excellence of its stock, has become 
one of the most popular resorts for smokers 
and enjoys a gradually increasing trade, which 
will now compare favorably with any similar 
house in Eastern Indiana. Mr. Fetta is a 
native of Richmond and was born here in 
1849. He is a cigar maker by trade, in which 
line he has had over 10 years experience, and 
his judgement may be relied on by dealers 
or smokers as to the true value of goods offered 
for sale. 



john f. McCarthy, 

Grocer, Table and Home Supplies, 

No. 413 North Eighth St. 
This well known and popular depot for 
home and table supplies was first established 
by Messrs. McCarthy & Varley about five 
years ago, this firm conducting the business 
until February, i8Si, at which time Mr. Var- 
ley retired and Mr. McCarthy assumed entire 
control of the house, which he has ever since 
retained. The salesroom is located in a hand- 
some structure, 30x100 feet in dimensions, 
where is carried at all times a very full and 
complete stock of fine staple and fancy family 
groceries, teas, coffees, sugars, spices, canned 
goods of all kinds, produce, etc. A delivery 
wagon is kept for the prompt delivery of 
goods to patrons in all parts of the city and 
from two to three assistants are employed, 
and in the established and growing trade this 
house enjoys unrivaled facilities for procuring 
supplies direct from the best producers and 
jobbing houses of the country, and as the re- 
sult of an honorable and judicious business 
policy the trade has increased over 100 per 



cent, since Mr. McCarthy first assumed the 
management of the house, the annual sales 
now amounting to about $15,000. Mr. Mc- 
Carthy was born in Richmond in 1S55 and 
during his entire business life has been identi- 
fied with its progressive commercial operations. 



THOMAS PICKENS, 

Livery, Feed and Sale Stable, No. 
411 North Eighth St. 
This well known stable was originally es- 
tablished by Mr. Thomas Rose in 1S75 and 
conducted by him until 1S77, ' n which year it 
was purchased by Mr. Thomas Pickens, and 
the efficiency of his stable largely improved. 
These stables are located in a fine two story 
building, 45x132 feet in dimensions, and are 
fitted up in the most thorough manner, with 
ample accommodations tor 40 horses. From 
eight to ten good roadsters are kept for livery 
purposes, with a number of first class car- 
riages, phxtons, buggies, etc. Special atten- 
tion is given to boarding horses by the feed, 
day or week and the best of care taken of them 
by competent and experienced assistants em- 
ployed for the purpose. Carriages or buggies 
are promptly supplied for weddings, parties or 
funeral occasions and traveling men conveyed 
to distant points on reasonable terms. Sir. 
Pickens was born in Ohio in 1S41 and has 
resided in Richmond since 1S65. In August, 
1S62 he entered the army as a private in Com- 
pany G, 93d Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with 
Colonel Charles Anderson as regimental com- 
mander, and participated in many of the great 
battles of the rebellion, among which may be 
mentioned Stone River, Chicamauga, Mission 
Ridge, Ringold and Kenesaw Mountain. At 
the close of the war, in 1S65, he was mus- 
tered out as Second Sergeant of his company 
and soon after took up his residence in this 
city, where he was associated with its business 
operations up to the time of engaging in his 
present enterprise. 



M. B. BALLARD, 

Druggist, No. 201 Ft. Wayne Ave. 
This house was originally established by 
Mr. Ballard in 1S67 and is now recognized as 
the oldest drug store in this city in continuous 
operation. The salesroom is 16x60 feet In 
dimensions and has a frontage both upon Ft. 
Wayne Ave. and upon Eighth St. and is fitted 
up in metropolitan style and in all its appoint- 
ments will bear favorable comparison with the 
leading establishments of the kind in this sec- 
tion of the state. An average force of three 
assistants are employed and the stock carried 
comprises a complete line of pure drugs and 
chemicals, all popular and desirable proprie- 
tary medicine, paints, oils and varnishes, toilet 
articles and perfumeries, notions and fancy 
goods and pure wines and liquors for medical 
and sacramental purposes, tobaccos, cigars, 
etc. The prescription department, located in 
the rear, is neatly arranged and special atten- 
tion is given to the preparation of physicians' 
prescriptions and family recipes. Air. M. B. 



54 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



Ballard is a native of Warren County, O., but 
has had his residence here for the past 40 
years. During the rebellion he enlisted as a 
private in Company H, 140th Indiana Volun- 
teer Infantry, and" alter about two months 
service (having previously devoted his atten- 
tion to the study of medicine and surgery) he 
was detailed as assistant surgeon of the regi- 
ment and subsequently assigned to the position 
of surgeon in the hospital of the .:3d Army 
Corps, in which position he served up to the 
clo»e of the war. 



M. E. BARGIS, 

Stoves, Tinware, etc., S. W. Cor. 

Main and Fifth Sts. 
The business which has been under the 
able and efficient management of Mrs. M. E. 
Bargis for the last rive years was originally 
established in the year 1^45, so that it is one 
of the oldest stove ar.d tinware hou>es in Rich- 
mond, if not in this section of the state. The 
business is located in a substantial brick build- 
ing, where two floors and a large basement are 
occupied for sales and storage purposes. The 
salesroom is 1S.X120 feet in dimensions, thor- 
oughly stocked with a complete line of house- 
keepers' hardware, tin, copper anfi sheet iron 
ware, house furnishing goods, the best makes 
of heating and cooking stoves, ranges, etc., 
leading the trade in this city. The house 
makes a specialty of roofing, guttering, spout- 
ing, repairing and general job work of all 
kinds, enjoving telephonic communication 
■with all parts of this and adjoining towns and 
cities. The annual transactions will bear 
favorable comparison with any similar estab- 
lishment in this city and the trade of the 
house, which extends to all parts of the city 
and adjoining country, will reach about $15,000 
annually. Mrs. Bargis, in her management of 
the present enterprise, secures the services of 
the most accomplished workmen in the me- 
chanical department. 



J. A. KNABE, 

Staple a.nd Fancy Groceries, No. 511 

Main- St. 
Mr. Knabe first established himself in busi- 
ness in this city in company with his father, 
at 151 South Pearl St., in February, 1S70, 
under the firm name of A. Knabe & Son. In 
1S75 he purchased the interest of his father 
and continued the business alone until August. 
1S79, when he removed to his present quarters 
for the purpose or" securing better location and 
conveniences to accommodate his growing 
trade. The premises occupied for busin ■-- 
pur: oses embrace a handsome three story 
"crick structure, 26x120 feet in size, furnished 
with an elevator which conn .-ct> the 
basement with the upper floors. The main 
. is fhtt i up in metropolitan 
style and i- stocked with staple and fai 
ceries, pro\iv.on-. fruits vegetables, 
goous, nuts, confectionery and general country 
produce, tobacco, cigars, notions, etc, com- 
prising one of the rr.<.- - extensive home supply 



depots in the city, the trade extending through- 
out the city and surrounding country and 
amounting to about $70,000 per annum. Mr. 
Knabe is a native of Cincinnati, O., where he 
was born in 1S3S and in which city he was 
formerly engaged in the dry goods business 
for a period of to years. The accuracy of his 
business methods and the attention paid to 
securing the best class of goods for home sup- 
plies have largely contributed to the popularity 
the hou>e enjoys, both in city and country. 



C T. PRICE, Jr., 

Confectionery, No. S08 Main St. 
One of the mo-t popular confectioneries to 
be found in this city is that conducted by Mr. 
C T. Price at Xo.'SqS Main St., where, in a 
tastefully appointed salesroom, 15x75 feet in 
dimension;., is kept constantly on hand the 
finest grades of French and American confec- 
tionery, bon-bons, plain and fancy cakes, 
making a specialty of the manufacture of 
highly ornamental designs required for wed- 
dings, festivals, banquets, etc. They also 
carry in stock a fine assortment of foreign and 
domestic fruits, lemons, oranges, figs, bananas, 
etc. Ice cream of his own manufacture and 
soda water with pure fruit syrups are served 
in their appropriate season. He also handles 
in their season the finest Baltimore oysters, 
both in can and bulk or served by the dish to 
order in all popular styles. This establish- 
ment is deservedly popular with the better 
class of patrons and a business is transacted 
which will compare favorably with that of any 
similar establishment in the city. Four expe- 
rienced confectioners are employed in the 
manufacturing department and the excellent 
location of the house, in connection with the 
superority of its products, makes it the leading 
establishment in this line in the city. None 
but the best materials are used in the manu- 
facture of confectionery, consequently the 
products of the establishment find a ready sale 
both in the city and surrounding country for 
15 to 20 miles, while the trade is gradually 
increasing with each succeeding year. Mr. 
Price is a native of Philadelphia, where he 
was born in 1S40. He has been a resident of 
Indiana for the past 27 years and is a practical 
confectioner and thoroughly conversant with 
all the details of the business and requirements 
of the trade. 



W 



D. SCHOOLEY, 
General Jobbing Shop for Lighting 
Machinery and Electrical Machines 
of Ai.r. Kinds, Pattern Maker and 
Taxidermist, No. 149 Ft. Wayne '. \ 
Mr. W. P. .Schooley has been establisl 
business u>v 37 ye. rs and few individuals in 
this or any other community have had a more 
extensive and diversified experience. He is a 
practical and thoroughly experienced pattern 
and model maker and an inventor of con- 
■ ingenuity and prominence — his al- 
ready noted Patent Electric Gas Lighter 
being a very valuable invention and esj 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 



adapted to the instantaneous lighting ol street 
lamps, halls, churches and factories. It is 
very simple, effective and durable in its appli- 
cation. About three years ago Mr. Schooley 
added taxidermy to his list ot occupations and 
does quite a business in this line, being" the 
only taxideimist in the city. The skill lie has 
displayed in preparing and preserving the 
skins of birds and animals tor cabinets, so as 
to represent their natural appearance, is not 
surpassed by any contemporary in the West. 

PATRICK FLANAGAN, 

Dry Goods, Notions and Millinery, 

No. 430 Main - St. 
The large variety of articles embraced in 
the stock of Mr. Flanagan, at No. 430 Main 
St., is such as relates to the general wants of 
the community in this line: both staple and 
fancy dry goods, consisting of foreign and 
American dry goods, ladies' dress goods of the 
newest styles; domestic goods, white goods. 
and hosiery, gloves, notions, etc. In ad- 
dition to this is the millinery department, 
embracing newest styles of hats and bonnets, 
flowers, feathers, ribbons, trimmings, etc., 
while 'special attention is paid in season to 
trimming of hats and bonnets with neatness 
and taste by accomplished and experienced 
milliners and to meeting in every particular 
the requirements of this department of trade, 
the working department being on the second 
floor. Mr. Flanagan is a native of Ireland and 
was born in 1S27, coining to this country in 
1846. He has been a resident of Richmond 
for over 18 years, during 16 of which he has 
been at his present place of business. 



an established and gradually increasing: trade. 
Employment i- given to" three assistants, 
while a delivery wagon is used for the prompt 
delivery of goods to patrons in all part- of the 
city, enjoying telephonic communication both 
with all parts of this city and surrou 
towns and cities, while the honorable ar.d cor'- 
rect b-. sines* methods which characterize its 
transactions cannot fail to secure its perma- 
nency and prosperity. Mr. Beckwith is a 
native of Ham'Utbn County, this state, where 
he was born in 1S4S. After completing his 
education he became identified with commer- 
cial pursuit-, coming to this citv in I.&S-;. 



J. B. BECKWITH, 

Staple and Fancy Groceries, Cor. 

Eighth and North E Sts. 
This house was founded by Messrs. Reid & 
Beeler when the city was in its infancy and is 
recognized as the oldest grocery house here. 
They were succeeded by Mr. B. B. Mvrick 
and he by Mr. Louis Hininan, who conducted 
the business up to January, 1SS3, at which 
time this house came into the hands of Messrs. 
Beckwith & Harold and was so continued up 
to October 13th, 1SS3, at which time Mr. Har- 
old retired. This house occupies a tine busi- 
ness room at the location above given, which 
is 30x60 feet in dimensions, with basement ot* 
same size. The main business room is fitted 
up in metropolitan style, and both in the ar- 
rangement for display of stock and in the 
extent and variety of goods for home and 
table supplies will bear favorable comparison 
% with any contemporaneous establishment of 
the kind in Eastern Indiana. This house has 
one show case, which is the largest in the 
state, costing originally S250. In addition to 
a general line ot" staple and fancy groceries 
and provisions, embracing fresh produce from 
the best farmer- and dairies in the country, a 
specialty is made of fine teas and the best 
varieties of canned goods and -pices, amuni- 
tion and huntera' supplies. This house enjoys 



SAMUEL KLEIN, 

News Depot, Confectionery, etc., 
No. S19 North E St. 

Among those occupations which contribu:e 
to the diffusion of intelligence are our ne^s, 
periodical and stationery depots, ar.d in this 
connection we direct attention to the we'd 
stocked and conducted news depot of Mr. 
Samuel Klein, located at No. S19 North E St- 
The business of Mr. Klein occupies a building 
15x90 feet in dimensions, which is divided 
into two departments, in one of which is car- 
ried a large stock of all the desirable illus- 
trated papers, daily and weekly papers, books 
and magazines, etc. Mr. Klein is the agent in 
this city for the Indianapolis Journal and the 
Cincinnati Xcv.s-'journal, delivered to parties 
in all parts of the city. He carries a complete 
line of French and Ameriean confectionery, 
fine domestic and Havana cigars, tobacco'-, 
etc. The business of this house will compare 
favorably with that of any similar establish- 
ment in Eastern Indiana, the annual transac- 
tions amounting to about 315.C00. Mr. Klein 
was born in Richmond in 1S62 and established 
himself at his present location on September 
2d, 1SS2, since which time his trade has been 
steadily on the increase. 



HENRY H. RUNGE, 

Dealer in Notions, Fancy Goods, 
Music and Musical Merchandise, No. 
610 Main St. 
Mr. H. H. Runge is general dealer in fancy 
goods, notions, music and musical 'merchan- 
dise, with a spacious ar.d commodious sales- 
room, located at No. 610 Main St. Although 
established here as recently as February, i>> 
this house has already secured a liberal r.rfi 
growing trade, embracing among its pati 
many of the leading families of both citv and 
county. A large and wl!'. selected stock of 
goods is carried, embracing a fine assortment 
of fancy goods and all kinds of notions, to- 
gether with a f usical instrunu 
sheet music. i. -" 1 ci ' >oks, i . \ .d ... . 
American guitar and violin strii ,-'.. J musi- 
cal merchandise generally. The facilities 
enjoyed by this house in securing its s 
from the leading tmporte! » arid 
country are hot surpassed '. empora- 
neous "establishment in Eastern India a 
Western Ohio. Mr. Runge, the proprietor of 



56 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



this house, is a native of this city, where he 
■was born in 185 1, and has for many years 
been identified with business and commercial 
pursuits. 

H. W. DEWKER, 

Grocer, No. 121 Ft. Wayne Ave. 
The business in which Mr. H. W. Dewker 
is engaged was started by him over eight 
years ago and since that time has increased in 
volume over 50 per cent. The premises occu- 
pied embrace a fine two story brick, building, 
18x70 feet in dimensions, with additional room 
in the rear, and the general stock carried com- 
prehends a choice selection of staple and fancy 
groceries, canned goods, fine family flour, 
fruits, nuts, tobaccos and cigars and all the 
best grades of goods for home and table sup- 
ply. Two assistants are employed and a 
delivery wagon for the prompt delivery of 
goods to patrons in all parts of the city. The 
trade of the house extends to all parts of the 
city and surrounding country, amounting to 
about $13,000 annually. Mr. Dewker was 
born in Richmond in 1855 and has been for 
the major part of his business life identified 
with this department of trade. No house in 
this line enjoys ampler facilities for securing 
fresh supplies from producers and the leading 
jobbing houses in the country; neither does 
any bear a higher reputation for fair weights 
and measures or a higher grade of family 
supplies. 

MRS. JOSEPH BETZOLD, 

Notion's, Fancy Goods and Milli- 
nery, No. 431 Main St. 

Of the various mercantile pursuits, there 
are few of more general interest and utility to 
ladies than those known as millinery and 
notion stores. Of the establishments engaged 
in this branch of trade in Richmond, we call 
special attention to that conducted by Mrs. 
Joseph Betzold, at No. 431 Main St., where 
she occupies a fine business room, which is 
kept liberally stocked with most desirable and 
seasonable goods, selected with direct refer- 
ence to the requirements of all who admire 
both taste and style, consisting of the newest 
novelties in pattern hats and bonnets, ribbons, 
trimmings, flowers, feathers and all kinds of 
notions. Especial attention is given to secur- 
ing newest seasonable styles immediately on 
their appearance in the metropolitan cities of 
the East. Mr. Joseph Betzold is a native of 
Cincinnati and came to this city in 1S61. In 
1863 he enlisted in the 124th Indiana Volun- 
teer Infantry, serving up to August, 1S65. 
Mrs. Betzold" established the business in 1S65 
and enjoys the patronage of the better class of 
citizens in both city and country. Her annual 
business will compare favorably with other 
houses in this line. Especial attention is paid 
to the trimming department, in which special 
pains are taken to secure the pleasure of 
patrons. She gives special attention to keep- 
ing ajfull stock of zephvrs, worsteds, notions, 
hosiery, furnishing goods, etc. 



CHARLES BELLINGER, 
Baker, No. 322 Main St. 

This house was originally established by 
Mr. Mason some years ago, from whom it 
passed to his son, Mr. Jeff. Mason, the latter 
gentleman being succeeded by Mr. Bellinger 
about seven years ago, who has ever since 
conducted the business, producing the choicest 
bread, cakes, etc., to be obtained in this city. 
Special attention is paid to the preparation of 
fine fancy cakes for parties, weddings or festi- 
val occasions. Mr. Bellinger enjoys ample 
facilities and uses only the choicest quality of 
flour. Mr. Bellinger'is a native of England 
and was born in 1826, coming to this country 
in May, 1S71, landing at New York. He 
learned the baking business in that country, 
where every one must serve a regular appren- 
ticeship and understands the business thor- 
oughly. He has been engaged in the busi- 
ness now for over 40 years, 12 of which were 
spent at it in the United States. 



BENSON BROS, 

Groceries, Fruits, Provisions, Poul- 
try, etc. Cor. Ft. Wayne Ave. and 
Seventh St. 
Although established as recently as Septem- 
ber, 1SS2, the house of Benson Bros, has 
already acquired a large degree of popularity 
and patronage. This firm occupy a spacious 
and neatly arranged and well located sales- 
room, where they carry a general and com- 
plete line of fine family groceries, both staple 
and fancy, including teas, coffees, sugars, 
spices, soaps, syrups, canned goods, foreign 
and domestic fruits, vegetables, produce, etc, 
together with all kinds of provisions, and 
poultry and fish in their season, in which they 
have established a trade that will compare 
favorably with the general grocery houses 
of the city. Messrs. C. F. and H. C. Bensou, 
the gentlemen comprising the firm, are both 
natives of Indiana and are thoroughly conver- 
sant with all the details of the business and 
requirements of the trade. 

SOL. KLEIN, 

Confectionery, Fruits, Nuts, etc., 
Nos. 169 and 171 Ft. Wayne Ave. 
Mr. Sol. Klein, the subject of the present 
sketch, is a native of the Kingdom of Bavaria 
and was born in the year 1S30, coming to this 
country in 1S53. He has been a resident of 
Richmond for about 32 years and has occupied 
his present location for 22 years, during the 
whole of which period he has enjoyed a large 
and lucrative trade. His salesroom is neatly 
arranged and fitted up in metropolitan style, 
where is carried a large and complete line of 
plain, fancy and ornamental confectionery, 
foreign and domestic fruits and nuts, choice 
brands of cigars, etc, together with oysters, ice 
cream and soda water in their season. The 
neat and handsomely furnished ice cream par- 
lors are always inviting and the purest ices, 
with genuine fruit flavors, are served to patrons 
in the most tempting forms. Mr. Klein is a 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 



57 



public spirited and enterprising business man 
and his establishment is one of the most popu- 
lar of its kind in the city. 

W. O. THOMPSON, 

Manufacturer and Wholesale and 
Retail Dealer in All Kinds of 
Stick and Home Made Candies, Nuts, 
Fruits, etc., No. 14 North Ninth St. 
The business in which Mr. Thompson is 
engaged was started by him nearly 20 years 
ago in another location, removing to his pres- 
ent place about two years ago. Here he occu- 
pies a substantial two story building, iSx6o 
feet in dimensions, where he manufactures all 
kinds of stick and home made candies, with 
which he supplies most of the small dealers in 
this city and vicinity, and makes a specialty of 
fine caramels and pure candies, fruits, nuts 
and fine cigars. He employs ample assistance 
and enjoys a large and lucrative trade, extend- 
ing within a radius of 13 to 30 miles, embrac- 
ing adjoining counties of Indiana and Ohio. 
Mr. Thompson was born in Ohio in 1S36 but 
has been a resident of Indiana for over 30 
years. He is a practical candy maker and has 
had many years experience in the business, 
which guarantees to patrons that reliability 
that so thoroughly meets the wants of his 
growing trade. 

JOHN M. EGGEMEYER, 

Packer and Shipper of Butter and 
Eggs, and Dealer in Groceries and 
Provisions, 401 and 402 Main St. 
This business was originally established by 
Mr. Thos. Nestor in 1S51, who commenced 
business in a comparatively limited way, a few 
doors west of the present location After two 
years he removed to the premises now occu- 
pied, where the business was continued up to 
187S, at which time Mr. Eggemeyer became 
associated with Mr. Ne-tor as partner. Special 
attention has been devoted to the collection of 
eggs and butter from producers and dealers in 
this and adjoining counties of Indiana and 
Ohio, and the trade has been marked with a 
steady and gratifying increase. Mr. Eggemey- 
er, the present proprietor of the house, had en- 
joyed a previous experience in this department 
of trade for 13 years. Upon the retirement 
of Mr. Nestor in 1S79, the firm name became 
Buhl & Eggemeyer, and upon the death of Mr. 
Buhl in 1SS1, the entire business came into the 
hands of the present proprietor. The business 
of this house embraces two distinct depart- 
ments. The general grocery and provision 
store being located at No. 401, while the egg 
and butter packing and shipping department 
is situated on the opposite side of Main Street 
at No. 402. The genera! grocery department 
6tands at the corner of Main and" Fourth Sts., 
opposite the court house, where it occupies a 
fine two-story brick building iSxi2o feet in di- 
mensions, which is kept constantly stocked at 
all times with staple and fancy groceries, em- 
bracing the best and finest goods pertaining to 
house supplies in this department of trade, en- 



joying telephonic connection with all parts of 
^he city and adjacent towns. The butter and 
egg packing and shipping department is situa- 
ted almost directly opposite, and occupies a 
three story brick building 21x120 feet in which 
ample space and facilities are enjoyed for stor- 
ing, preserving, packing and shipping. In this 
branch the transactions embrace an average 
shipment of iSoo barrels of eggs and about 15 
tons ot butter per annum. An average force 
of seven assistants is employed, while several 
wagons are constantly on the road soliciting 
supplies from the country districts. Mr. Egge- 
meyer is a native of this city, in which his 
business life has chiefly been devoted. 

HENRY H. ENGELBERT, 

Manufacturer of Havana and Do- 
mestic Cigars, 13 North Eighth St. 
Among the leading manufacturers of choice 
Havana and domestic cigars in this city and 
Eastern Indiana is the establishment of Mr. 
Henry H. Engelbert, whose establishment is 
numbered 166. Mr. Engelbert is a native of 
this city, where he was born in 1S54. He is a 
practical cigar maker and gives his personal 
attention to the business, in addition to the 
employment of an average force of from three 
to five hands. His manufacturing department 
embraces a rear room at the above named 
location, 20x40 feet in dimensions, and the 
annual products of this house will range from 
200,000 to 250,000 cigars. The leading brands 
of cigars here manufactured are: "Famous 
Ten Cent Straight," a ten cent cigar, and the 
following brands of five cent cigars, "Eighth 
Street," "Little Pansy" and "No. 13." These 
cigars are of standard value, if indeed they 
have an equal in the products of any contem- 
poraneous establishment East or West. Mr. 
Engelbert first commenced business in part- 
nership with A. J. Landwer, in May, 1SS3, at 
No. 623 Main St., this partnership continuing 
up to October of the same year, at which time 
the partnership was dissolved. The business 
was continued at the same location up to De- 
cember 24th, at which time he removed to his 
present location. 



B. PARDIECK & SONS, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in All 
Kinds of Cabinet Furniture, Nos. 
505 and 507 Main St. 
Mr. Pardieck is a native of Oldenberg, Ger- 
many, where he was born in 1S35. He came 
to this country over 2S years ago and has for 
many years been engaged in this department 
of trade. Prior to removal to his present 
location he carried on business at Nos. 205 
and 207 South Filth St. In his present quar- 
ters he occupies a fine business room, 2SJ5XX05 
feet in dimensions, utilizing both the first and 
second stories for the storage and display of 
every description of cabinet and household 
furniture, both common and upholstered goods, 
parlor, dining room and bed room suites, com- 
mon and marble top bureaus, stands, etc., office 
furniture, lounges, sofas, chairs, etc. He pays 



58 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



considerable attention to the manufacturing 
department, especially to wood bottom chairs, 
of which he sells from 400 to 500 dozen per 
annum. His store is one of the finest in this 
section of the state and one of the most inviting 
to those desiring this class of goods. 

E. MORROW & SONS, 

Groceries and Provisions, No. 175 

Ft. Wayne Ave. 
The above named firm established them- 
selves at their present location about five years 
ago, Mr. Morrow, Sr., having formerly been 
engaged in business on the same avenue since 
JS54. Their present establishment has secured 
a successful trade, by virtue of the excellent 
business management associated with its 
operations. The premises occupied consist of 
two floors in a substantial brick building, each 
floor being 20x76 feet in size and thoroughly 
stocked with the better grades of goods, evinc- 
ing the ability of this house to compete in 
home supplies with any contemporaneous 
establishment in the city. An excellent stock 
is carried, embracing fine staple and fancy 
family groceries, teas, coffees, sugars, spices, 
canned goods, fruits, nuts, produce and gro- 
cers' sundries generally, which is being almost 
daily replenished by fresh jjrrivals from the 
best jobbing houses and producers in the 
country. Mr. Elihu Morrow, the senior 
member of the firm, was born in this county 
in 1S17 and has been identified with this 
branch of trade, embracing both wholesale and 
retail, since 1S54. His two sons, the other 
members of the firm, are both natives of Rich- 
mond and thoroughly experienced in all the 
details of the businsss. 

H. C. LARSH, 

Carriage Manufacturer, No. 158 and 

160 Ft. Wayne Avenue. 
This gentleman is entitled to the most favor- 
able consideration for his efforts in developing 
und securing the latest improvements in styles 
and construction in this important branch of 
industry. The premises occupied by these 
works in the various departments embrace a 
large and substantial three story brick building 
3SxSo feet in dimensions, with an " L" 40x40 
and one story high fronting on North " D " 
street, besides which other buildings and 
ground space occupied comprise a space of 
40.XS0 feet, affording the amplest facilities for 
the efficient manulacture of all kinds of light 
and heavy carriages, buggies, phuttons, etc. of 
every description and of the most approved 
styles and finished workmanship, while all 
•work turned out by this house is subjected to 
the most rigid inspection before leaving the 
works. An average force of eight skilled 
workmen is regularly employed, and from 40 
to 50 complete vehicles are turned out annu- 
ally. A specialty is made of an improved two- 
bow top, which has been pronounced by com- 
petent judges to be the best bow top made, and 
the manufacture of which is controlled in 
Wayne county by Mr. Larsh. This business 



has been installed here for a number of years, 
coming into the control of Mr. Larsh in Nov. 
1SS2, since which time the scope of its opera- 
tions have been materially increased and aug- 
mented through the recognized excellence of 
the work turned out. Mr. Larsh is a native 
of this county and learned his trade in the 
same shop he now controls. With an experi- 
ence of about 15 years and the amplest facili- 
ties in this department of trade ne has secured 
a prominence which entitles his establishment 
to liberal public consideration. 

HOOSIER DRILL COMPANY, 

This establishment, one of the largest in the 
country, was originally started at Milton, this 
county, and removed here in 1S7S, where com- 
modious buildings are occupied for the manu- 
facture of grain drills. About 150 hands are 
employed and the annual business is very 
large. J. M. Westcott is President; Omar 
Hollingsworth, Treasurer; F. A. Wilke, Sec- 
retary, and J. A. Carr, Superintendent. 



H. H. MEERHOFF, 

Plumber, Steam and Gas Fitter, No. 

8 South oth St. 
This is the most prominent establishment of 
the kind here and is located in a handsome 
three-story brick building, -3x34 feet in dimen- 
sions, erected, owred and occupied by him. 
Mr. Meerhoffis a native of Kingdom" Hano- 
ver, Germany, where he was born in 1S30, and 
came to America in 1S48. He learned the 
trade of plumber in Cincinnati, where we was 
employed in one house sixteen years, and came 
to Richmond in 1S66. In the following year 
he commenced business here as a member of 
the firm of Wefel & Meerhoff, which continu- 
ed until 1869, when Mr. James Dickinson was 
admitted as a partner and the firm name was 
changed to Dickinson, Wefel & Meerhoff. In 
1S71 Mr. Wefel retired and Messrs. Dickinson 
& Meerhoff continued the business as partners 
until die death of Mr. Dickinson in 1S76, when 
Mr. Meerhoff became sole proprietor, and has 
conducted the business alone ever since. He 
transacts a general plumbing, steam and gas 
fitting business, and is prepared to execute all 
orders promptly and at the shortest possible 
notice, guaranteeing first-class workmanship, 
and entire satisfaction in all cases. He also 
deals extensively in, and has constantly in 
stock, gas fixtures, chandeliers, brackets, all 
kinds of iron and wood pumps, iron and lead 
pipe, steam fittings, hydrants, stop cocks, valves, 
water closets and fixtures, drive wells, etc He 
also deals extensively in sewer pipe, keeping 
the best make in the market and enjoys the 
amplest facilities for supplying farmers and 
others upon the most reasonable terms. He 
employs from six to ten assistants, and trans- 
acts an extensive business in this city and sur- 
rounding country, while the policy upon which 
his house has been conducted is such as to 
place it in the front rank in all progressive fea- 
tures which contribute to our leading commer- 
cial enterprise. 



CITY Or RICHMOND. 



59 



WAYNE AGRICULTURAL COMP'Y, 
Agricultural Implements, etc. 
Was organized in 1S72 with a capital stock of 
3100,000, and the works were l hen located at 
Dublin, this county. Three years later they 
were removed to this city, where very com- 
modious quarters are occupied. About 175 
men are employed and the annual business 
■will amount to more than $400,000. The offi- 
cers are L. L. Lawrence, President; William 
Baxter, Vice President; Thaddeus Wright, 
Secretary and Treasurer. 



poraneous house east or west, thus enabling 
him to offer to the trade inducements unsur- 
passed in our metropolitan cities. Both a 
wholesale and retail business is transacted and 
the annual sales will now compare favorably 
with the leading commercial houses of the 
state. An average force of 15 salesmen and 
assistants here find employment, marking each 
successive year with a gradually increasing 
volume of business. This house occupies a 
prominent position among the leading com- 
mercial pursuits of this county and state. 




P^-^-.^-^ 








<■" y : 3 



m ^mmiM 



v^^S^i.A:-^- "-^ frg"^: : ".; . - V ~~ \^'.:-: : /2>i£-. "l^ ~^3 



KNABE'S BAZAAR, 

Wholesale and Retail Notions and 
Furnishing Giods, Crockery, Glass 
and Tin Ware, Fancy Goods, etc., Cor. 
Main and 6th Streets. 
Mr. Frank A. Knabe, the proprietor of this 
now well known house is a native of Ohio, 
where he was born in 1S40. After completing 
his early education he became identified with 
commercial pursuits, engaging in business in 
-.Cincinnati, Ohio, on his own account in 1S64. 
After an experience of several years in busi- 
ness in that city, he removed to Richmond in 
1879, where the wisdom of his undertaking has 
been verified in the large and established trade 
this house has here secured. The premises 
occupied by Knabe's Bazaar embraces a fine 
business room 25x125 feet in dimensions, in 
addition to basement of same size, which is 
fitted up in metropolitan style and stocked with 
imported and American notions, furnishing 
goods, crockery and glass ware and all kinds 
of tin ware, fancy goods, etc. The many years 
of experience enjoyed by Mr. Knabe has se- 
cured to him the most comprehensive facilities 
and arrangements with importers, manufactu- 
rers and trade sales of the east, for securing 
supplies upon as liberal terms as any contem- 



JOHN O'HARRA, 

Daily Market, Meats, Fruits and 
Vegetables, No. Si 2 and S14 Main St. 
One of the most energetic and successful 
business men in the city of Richmond, is Mr. 
John O'Harra, located at S12 and 814 Main Sl 
This gentleman established himself in business 
here about six years ago, and his business has 
increased steadily from year to year, until at 
present it ranks among the largest of its class 
in the city. Mr. O'Harra moved to his present 
location in May, 1SS3, and occupies a spacious 
and commodious salesroom, 3^x90 feet in size, 
situated in a substantial brick structure, in the 
central part of the city, where he keeps on 
hand a fine stock of meats, fruits and vegeta- 
bles, poultry and game in their season, and 
wholesale fruits, oysters and fish. He is 
always careful in selecting none but the best 
cattle for his trade. Some idea of the charac- 
ter and ability of this gentleman may be 
gleaned from the fact that he started in "busi- 
ness six years ago without a dollar, and 
through his indomitable energy and industry- 
overcame all obstacles, attending strictly to 
business, until to-day he transacts an annual 
business of about $25,000, with an extensive 
trade over the entire city and adjoining coun- 



60 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



try, requiring the services of five assistants. 
Mr. O'Harra deals heavily in fruits and vegeta- 
bles, the trade in these articles during the 
summer months amounting to about $5,000. 
Mr. O'Harra is a native of Butler County, O., 
and was born in 1S43, removing to Indiana 
about six years ago. 

CHASE PIANO COMPANY, 

This enterprise was incorporated in 1S75, 
with a capital stock of $40,000. Capacity of 
the works is 25 instruments per week "and 
about 150 hands are employed. The officers 
are James M. Starr, President; C. C. Coffin, 
Vice President; Benjamin Starr, Secretary and 
Treasurer; M.J. Chase, General Manager. 



PETER LICHTENFELS & CO., 

The POPULAR One Price Clothiers 
Corner Main and qth Sts. 
One of the most popular houses in the city- 
engaged in this branch of trade is the firm of 
Peter Lichtenfels & Co., who have perfected 
arrangements for securing custom made cloth- 
ing of superior quality, and of equal value in 
style, finish and workmanship to that manu- 
factured by merchant tailors. The firm occu- 
py a spacious and neatly arranged storeroom, 
23x110 feet in dimensions, where may be con- 
stantly found an extensive stock of custom- 
made clothing, to which especial attention is 
given, embracing garments for men, boys and 
children of every grade and style which the 
firm guarantee to sell as cheap as any house in 
the state can sell goods of similar value, be- 
cause of the advantages which they possess in 
securing supplies, and the small expense at- 
tached to their business operations. Four assis- 
tants are required to conduct the extensive 
trade of the house, which is the largest of the 
kind in the city. Mr. Lichtenfels was born 
in this city in 1S45, and established himself at 
his present business in 1S79, previous to which 
he was in the employ of others in this depart- 
ment of trade. Occupying a leading position 
in the clothing trade in this city and county 
this house is justly entitled to the full and lib- 
eral notice here accorded. 



Following are the more important firms not 
_. already mentioned, with some of which are 
*"* given amount of their annual sales. 

Hardware and Impelmf.nts. — John H. 
Roling, 606 Main St.; Thos. Cuamer Si Co., 
Main and Seventh Sts.; Peter Crocker, 913 
Main St.; Stratton & Gordon, 101S Main St. 

Groceries, Cigars, etc.— J. H. Dickman, 
603 Main St., $50,000; J. H. Moorman, 520 
Main St.; W. Lammert, Jr., South Ninth St.; 
J. J. Jordan, 526 Main St.; C. A. Jones, 1S9 
Ft. Wayne Ave.; J. G. Brooks, Twelfth and 
North, $ 10,000; S. M. Pierson, 193 Ft. Wayne 
Ave., $35,000; C Caster, 117 Ft. Wayne Ave., 
$7,000; John Peterson, 427 West Main; C. H. 
Chambers, 1138 Main; C. Lammert, Eighth 
and South E Sts., $8,000; D. Bowers, 910 
Main, $20,000; Shafer and Stranahan, 1538 
East Main, $15,000; ,S. F. Nutting, 324 Main 



St., $15,000; Henrv Cutter, Fourth and South 
D Sts, $50,000; C. Yohl.-e, 449 South Fifth; 
S. Schmitt, 315 South Fifth St. ; G. H. Snv- 
der, Eighth and South C Sts.; S. M. Buckley, 
Eighth and Main Sts; C. Kreimeier, 10 North 
Sixth St.; S. Rogers, 13 North Eighth St.; P. 
Young, 121 South Fifth St.; J. Poundstone, 
817J3' North E. St. 

Dry Goods, Cloth tsse, Boots, Shoes, 
Millinery and Fancy Goods— L. E. Leon- 
ard & Co., S19 Main S:t, $100,000; G. W. 
Mashmever & Co., Main and Eighth Sts ; G. 
W. Schipman, 407 Main St., $20,000; J. H. 
Hatfield, 916 Main; J. C. Peltz, Ninth St.; J. 
Werner, 911 Main St, Sy,ooo; S. Fox, 714 
Main St., $30,000; J. Zeven & Bro., 516 Main 
St.; B. Kreimeir, 423 Mlain St., $40,000; J. 
Marcus, S25 Main St., £20,000; Tuck Bros, 
726 Main St., $20,000; E. L. Reynolds, 530 
Main St.; Estell Bros., 403 Main St., $5,009* 
E. F. Aleiev, 23 North Eighth St.; E. H. 
Menke, 421 Main St.; B. INIaag, 614 Main St., 
$20,000; Mr*. Vunsant, 311 North Eighth St., 
$12,000; T. B. Scott, S17 Main St.; Louer Si 
Co, 720 Main St.; S. Fox, 62S Main St., 
$12,000; J. Macke & Son, 536 Main St. 

Furniture, Music Instruments, etc. — 
Smith & Dunham, 627 Main St. ; E. F. Dalby, 
^ Main St., $20,000; F. Grothaus, 31 South 
Fifth St., $iS,ooo; F. A. Drake, 5 N. Eighth. 

Drugs, Books and Jewelry. — A. G. 
Luken & Co., 62S Main Sit; Dale & Homada, 
912 Main St.; Lvon & Co., 601 Main St.; W. 
H. Ross, S04 Main St.; J. Reule, 50S Main St. 
J. Wampler, S04 Main St.; Morris & Hunt, 
71S Main St., $20,000; E.. J. Ward, 70S Main 
St, $6,000. 

Lumber, Coal and Wood.— John Henley, 
Main and Tenth Sts.; H. M. Roberts & Son, 
Eighth St.; Mather Bros., 260 Ft. Wayne 
Ave.; J. W. Moore Si Co., 1022 Main St., 
$20,000; William Dick, North A. St.; E. R. 
Matthews, Fifteenth St. 

Crockery, Tin and Wooden Ware and 
Harness.— A. W. Meyer, 600 Main St., $12,- 
000; H. Wilke, 433 Main St.. $20,000; J. 
Potts Si Son, 914 Main St.; F. Van Uxem Si 
Co., 625 Main St., $25,000; A. J. Hoffman, 
629 Main St, $25,000; G. Detch Si Son, 517 
Main St., $9,000; A.J.Coiffman, 519 Main St.; 
C. A. Keys, 61S Main St., $15,000. 

Insurance and Real Estate —Provident 
Life Association, S North. Seventh St.; S. Bel- 
lis, 10 North Seventh St.; Lemon Si Clark, 
Eighth and Main Sts.; William Bradburv Si 
Son, 730 Main St.; O. P. Crocker, Hittle Bl'k. 

Miscellaneous.— Richmond Church Fur- 
niture Company, Eighth St. and Washington 
Ave.; Sinex Plow Cor:rpanv, 174 Ft. Wayne 
Ave.; S. Marlatt, 1S2 Ft Wayne Ave, iron 
fences, $7,000; B. B. D'eal & Co., 1S4 Ft. 
Wayne Ave., produce; Quaker City Chair 
Company, 15 South Eleventh St, $50,000; 
DeWitt, Stokes & Co., ug North Eighth St., 
factory supplies, $30,00^; Valley Oil Mills, 
linseed oil; Kentworthv a: Co., 183 Ft. Wayne 
Ave., Commission; G. W. Barnes, 9 South 
Fifth St., Seeds, $50,000; Richmond Roller 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 



61 



"Mill, North Second St.; E. Patterson & Co., 
283 Ft. Wayne Ave., plows; Richmond Chair 
Company, Thirteenth St.; C. E. Newman, 16 
North Seventh St, clothes wringers; L. J. 
Templeton Si Co., 41 North Eighth St., com- 
^nission, $50,000; Crume, Dunn & Co., 12 



North Seventh St., tannery and collars, $100,- 
000; Arlington House, "Nir.th St.; M. L. 
Crocker, 535 Main St., commission; Patent 
Flue Thimble Company, 923 Main St.; Bry- 
son House, Ft. Wayne Ave. 













A RICHMOND MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENT. 



CAMBRIDGE CITY. 



Ranking as the second city in import- 
ance in the county of Wayne, Cambridge 
City, although not dreamed of when many 
of her sister cities had secured consider- 
able prominence as trade centers, has now 
a just claim to liberal consideration as 
one of the important trade centers of the 
state. In 1870 it had a population of 
2,162 and in 1880 it had 2,370, while it 
now claims a population of about 3,000 
inhabitants. It is located near the banks 
of the White Water River in Jackson 
Township, 16 miles west of Richmond 
and 53 miles east of Indianapolis. Its 
transportation facilities may be indicated 
in the fact that it enjoys the advantages 
of four leading lines of railroad, giving 
them an outlet to all sections of the 



country, east, west, north and south, as 
follows: Pittsburg, Cincinnati and St. 
Louis; White Water Valley; Ft. Wayne, 
C. & L., and Cambridge City branch of 
the J. M. & I. Railroad. The city has an 
excellent Fire Department with one steam 
fire engine. Its churches are Methodist 
Episcopal, Presbyterian, Baptist, Chris- 
tian and Catholic. It has two weekly pa- 
pers, the Tribune and the Wayne Citizen, 
with two well supported public libraries. 
There are several flouring mills and agri- 
cultural impliment manufacturers, while 
its business houses, most of which will 
be found noticed editorially in this work, 
will bear favorable comparison with those 
of our metropolitan cities. 



J. & D. KIMMEL, 
Malsters. 
The steadily increasing popularity of malt 
beverage among all classes of the community 
■within the past quarter of a century has ren- 
dered this production one of our most im- 
portant national industries and called into 
existence immense establishments devoted to 
the manufacture of malt, which have in turn 
stimulated agriculture and vastly benefited 
the communities in which they exist. The 
only firm in Indiana engaged exclusively in 
this important department of industrial enter- 
prise is that of Messrs. J. & D. Kimmel, whose 
extensive malt houses in Cambridge City are 
entitled to prominent recognition among the 
leading activities of Wayne County. The 
business, which was established here in 1S56, 
has grown >o very large proportions, the 
annual transactions of this firm at the present 
time reaching fully $150,000. Reference is 
made in another portion of this work to this 
well known firm and their enterprise — in the 
perfection and introduction of steam gang 
plows, etc. The malt establishment covers a 
ground space of about an acre, which is occu- 
pied for the various buildings and departments. 
The buildings, which cover an aggregate area 



of 75x112 feet, are substantially constructed of 
brick and are all three stories in height. The 
most approved processes are utilized for malt- 
ing, and steam and motive power is supplied 
by one 40 horse power engine and boiler. 
Eight assistants are regularly employed. It 
is one of the most important manufacturing 
interests of Cambridge City. 

J. W. MARSON, 

Groceries, etc., Nos. 244, 246, 248, 324 
and 326 Main St. 

Mr. Marson is a native of England, but 
came to this country when but a small boy. 
Although yet a young man (37 years of age), 
he has by his indefatigable will power and 
strict application to business attained a promi- 
nent position in commercial circles and stands 
to-day at the head of three important mercan- 
tile houses, conducted in his own name, and 
also holds a half interest in the house of Mar- 
son & Holderman, of this city. At No. 244 
Main St. he occupies a spacious and conveni- 
ently arranged salesroom, 20x120 feet in 
dimensions, which is filled to its utmost stor- 
age capacity with a completely and carefully 
selected assortment of staple and fancy gro- 
ceries, general culinary and domestic supplies,. 



CAMBRIDGE CITY. 



63 



etc., joining this on the west is another 
salesroom of the same dimensions, conducted 
by Mr. Marson and devoted to the sale of 
china, crockery, glass and queensware, clocks, 
jewelry of all descriptions, solid silver and 
plated ware, table cutlery, mirrors, lamps, 
chandeliers, musical instruments, sewing ma- 
chines, trunks, satchels, bird cages, chromos 
and miscellaneous merchandise pertaining to 
house furnishing supplies. The commodious 
salesroom next door west is occupied by 
Messrs. Marson and Holderman for the sale of 
agricultural implements, hardware, etc., and is 
also 20x120 feet in size. These stores are sub- 
stantiality constructed of brick and connected 
by open archways, forming an immense 

TRIPLE SALESROOM, 

60x120 feet in dimensions, with stocks in each 
department, which for completeness and de- 
sirability are not excelled by those of similar 
establishments in the metropolitan cities East 
or West. In addition to these model estab- 
lishments, Mr. Marson also conducts a finely 
stocked grocery house at No. 324 and 326 
Main St. The* patronage of these establish- 
ments is derived not only from the better class 
of city customers but from the agricultural 
community within a radius of 25 miles, and 
the aggregate annual transactions of the three 
houses, exclusive of the agricultural imple- 
ment department, is from $50,000 to $75,000. 

STAHR'S CENTRAL HOTEL AND 
RESTAURANT. 

Commercial travelers and business men 
generally having occasion to visit Cambridge 
City, will rind at Stahr's Central Hotel and 
Restaurant all the comforts, conveniences and 
appointments of a first class modern metro- 
politan hotel, including commodious sample 
rooms, well stocked bar and a handsomely 
furnished billiard room, yet the transient rates 
of which have been reduced to the popular 
prices of $2 per day. The "Central" is as its 
name implies, centrally and eligibly located on 
the main thoroughfare of the city, directly 
opposite the First National Bank, and occu- 
pies a handsome and commodious structure, 
three stories in height and 75x120 feet in 
dimensions, erected by Mr. Stahr expressly 
for hotel purposes. The first floor, with a 
graceful and substantial front of iron and plate 
glass, contains a spacious office, with gentle- 
men's reading, writing and smoking rooms, a 
handsomely arranged dining room, with a 
seating capacity for 50 guests, a restaurant, 
where first class meals or lunches are served 
on the European plan, the kitchen and culi- 
nary departments and two commodious sam- 
ple rooms for the use of commercial travelers. 
On the second floor are located the parlors 
and reception rooms, with a number of sleep- 
ing apartments, and the third floor is devoted 
to guest chambers, bed rooms, etc. Mr. Stahr, 
the popular proprietor of this house, estab- 
lished as early as 1S69 a first class restaurant 
in this city, and the reputation it acquired and 
its rapidly increasing patronage necessitated 



the erection of his present commodious build- 
ing to accommodate his numerous patrons. 
He accordingly, in 1875, erected the building 
and opened the hotel, which has under his 
judicious management become the leading 
hotel in the city and especially recognized as 
the headquarters ot commercial travelers and 
the better class of trade. 



C. MARKLE, 

Insurance and Real Estate, Main St. 
Mr. Markle is the authorized agent and rep- 
resentative in this city for the following well 
known and responsible insurance companies: 
Continental, ot New York, assets $4,450,000; 
American, of Newark, N. J., assets $1,700,000; 
Phenix, of Brooklyn, N. Y., assets $3,300,- 
000; Glen Falls, N. Y., assets $1,300,000; 
Springfield, Mass., Fire and Marine, assets 
$3,295,000; Orient, Hartford, Conn, assets 
$1,420,000; Phoenix, London, England, assets 
$5,619,000; City of London, England, $2,ooc,- 
000; Queen, London, England, $5,395,000; 



Norwich Union, England, $: 



The 



promptness and amicable manner in which all 
losses in connection with this agency are 
adjusted have contributed to an established 
and yearly increasing business. In the depart- 
ment of Real Estate, Mr. Markle not only 
handles property on his own account, but 
occupies a position and familiarity with opera- 
tions which makes it to the interest of those 
desiring to purchase or sell real estate to place 
the matter in his hands. Holding at almost 
all times valuable farms and tracts 0/ land, 
town lots and other property, he is able to 
effect transactions often most desirable to pur- 
chasers. Mr. Markle also occupies the posi- 
tion of Western ticket agent for all railroads 
centering in IndianapolN. He is a native of 
Butler County, O., and during the many years 
of his association with the business and pro- 
gressive interests of this city and vicinity he 
has established an enviable record for prompt- 
ness and efficiency, through which he has not 
only secured a large circle of friends and 
acquaintances but also established a thriving 
and successful business. 

E. R. HASTINGS & SON, 

Groceries and Provisions. 
This house, at 265 West Main St., was es- 
tablished about seven years ago by Mr. E. R. 
Hastings and conducted by him up to about 
two years ago, at which time his son, William 
E. Hastings, was admitted to partnership, 
when the firm name became as at present. 
The premises now occupied embrace a room 
and basement 22x100 feet in dimensions, in a 
two story brick building, where employment 
is given to three assistants, in addition to the 
members of the firm. Here is constantly car- 
ried a full and complete stock of choice family 
groceries and provisions, embracing the finest 
varieties of teas, coffees, spices, sugars, syrups, 
canned goods, tobaccos, cigars, notions, etc. 
They carry a stock of from $5,000 to $6,000 
and their annual transactions will aggregate 



64 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



about $30,000, with city and country patron- 
age. Both of the proprietors are natives of 
this state and are thoroughly familiar by long 
experience with the trade in which they are 
engaged and enjoy the most comprehensive 
advantages in the procuring of supplies from 
the best sources. 

C. STRAUB, 

Bottler of Beer, Mineral Waters, 
Ginger Ales, etc. 
The old "City Brewery'" was erected by Mr. 
Henry Ingerman in 185 1 and has been occu- 
pied for the past 17 years by the present 
proprietor, Mr. C. Straub, who until recently 
•was engaged in the brewing business, manu- 
facturing an excellent article of ale. The 
popularity of la^er beer as a beverage induced 
Mr. Straub to abandon the manufacture of ale 
and confine his attention exclusively to the 
bottling department, which special branch of 
trade has become within the past years one of 
considerable importance in all sections of the 
Union. The leading specialty tor which Mr. 
Straub has acquired a more than local reputa- 
tion is that of furnishing to the trade and for 
family use a superior quality of bottled lager, 
from the famous brewery of Schmidt Bros., 
ot Indianapolis, which for purity, excellence 
and uniform reliability is unequaled by the 
products of any similar establishment in the 
West. Mr. Straub also bottles superior quali- 
ties of mineral and soda waters, ginger ale, 
cider and "soft drinks" generally. Having no 
competitors in this special line, Mr. Straub 
has established a flourishing and lucrative 
trade, extending throughout this and adjacent 
towns. Mr. Straub is a native of Germany 



and was born in the Province o( Wurtemburg 
in 1829. He has resided in Cambridge City 
for the past iS years, and has established "a 
prosperous trade and gained the confidence 
and respect ot his fellow citizens, having been 
elected to the responsible position of Treasurer 
of the School Board for 10 years, and has filled 
that office continuously since 1S70, with the 
exception of three years. 

HENRY SHUSSLER, 

New and Second Hand Goods, Furni- 
ture, etc., Main St. 
•Mr. Shussler carries in stock at his ware- 
rooms, on Main St., a general line of furniture, 
embracing the finer as well as common va- 
rieties of parlor and chamber suites, kitchen 
furniture, carpets, bedding and house furnish- 
ing goods, both new and second hand, which 
he is enabled to offer to the citizens of Cam- 
bridge and adjacent towns upon the most 
favorable terms. Mr. Shussler procures his 
supplies of new furniture direct from manu- 
facturers in various sections of the Union and 
is prepared to purchase all varieties of second 
hand furniture, bedding, carpets, queensware 
and household utensils, paying for them the 
highest market value. This house was estab- 
lished in April, 18S2, and has already secured 
a large and steadily increasing trade, extending 



not only throughout this city but to adjacent 
towns. Mr. Shussler is a native of Pennsyl- 
vania, where he was born in 1819. He has 
resided in this county for the past 48 vears. 

C. T. WRIGHT, 

Undertaker, Embalmer and Furni- 
ture Dealer. 

Mr. Wright inaugurated his present success- 
ful enterprise, the only one of its class here, 
upon a comparatively small scale during the 
Centennial year, and since that time a most 
gratifying increase of trade has rewarded his 
efforts. While his annual sales for 1876 
reached only about $3,000, his transactions 
during the past year nearly doubled that 
amount, and each succeeding season witnesses 
a steady and promising increase of business. 
He now occupies for sales and manufacturing 
purposes one room 20x120 feet in size, with 
an additional department 20x20 feet in dimen- 
sions, where he carries constantly in stock a 
full and desirable line of the finer as well as 
common grades of furniture and manufactures 
various styles of tables, sofas, bedsteads, etc. 
In connection with the furniture department 
he also conducts a general undertaking and 
embalming business, furnishing any desired 
styles of coffins, caskets and burial cases and 
giving his personal attention to the manage- 
ment of funeral ceremonies. He owns a fine 
hsarse, which he furnishes for funeral pur- 
poses and promptly attends to embalming 
bodies by the most approved processes. Mr. 
Wright is a native and lifelong resident of 
Indiana and was born in 1S51. By strict 
attention to his chosen pursuits and by hon- 
orable and conscientious methods of transact- 
ing business, he has built up a flourishing trade 

J. PIM & SON. 

• The flouring and grist mills now conducted 
by Messrs. James Pirn <$: Son, and located on 
the pike, about midway between Germantown 
and Cambridge City, were erected originally 
by a Mr. Hutchinson about half a century ago. 
Since then it has be--n frequently improved 
and remodeled and has recently undergone 
important changes to place it in first class con- 
dition for good and reliable work. In Decem- 
ber, 18S2, it came into the hands of its present 
proprietors, who are thoroughly practical 
millers and who are able to guarantee the 
highest efficiency in its products. Two hands 
are employed. "The building is 50x40 feet in 
dimensions and four and one-half stories high, 
in complete order, with three run of stones, 
including pony. The capacity of the mill is 
about 50 barrels every 24 hours. The trade is 
chiefly local, but shipments are made to some 
extent to the principal Eastern cities, the lead- 
ing brand being known as "Pirn & Son's 
Leader," and enjoys a high popularity with 
consumers and the trade. The individual 
members of this firm are J. Pirn and J.J. Pirn. 
The former is a native of Pennsylvania, where 
he was born in 1S25. His son/Mr. J. j. Pirn, 
is a native of Ohio, where he was born in 1S58. 



CAMBRIDGE CITY. 



65 



KIMMEL BROTHERS, 

Steam Gang Plows, Harvesting Ma- 
chines, etc. 
The individual members of this representa- 
tive firm are Messrs. Joseph, Daniel and Wil- 
liam Kimmel, all natives and life long resi- 
<ients of Wayne County, and in addition to 
their large malting and landed interests are 
among the most enterprising and progressive 
agriculturists in the county, owning and ope- 
rating a fine tract of 
-about 700 acres which 
is under a high state of 
-cultivation. These gen- 
tlemen have in their en- 
terprises exhibited pro- 
gress and by their inge- 
nuity and application 
have succeeded in per- 
fecting several labor 
saving machines some 
of which give great 
promise of success and 
bid fair to revolutionize 
• old methods of soil til- 
lage. One of their most 
important inventions 
which practical opera- 
tion during the past sea- 
son has demonstrated to 
oe of great value, is a 
steam plow, invented 
-and patented by Wm. 
Kimmel, June 9, 1SS3. 
It consists of six, plows 
or more in number pro- 
pelled by steam power 
adapting themselves by 
automatic means to any 
kind of soil or surface. 
The motive power for 
these plows is furnished 
by an ingeniously con- 
structed traction engine 
going over the ground 
on broad wheels 2 feet 
in width. Each plow 
acts independently of 
others in the gang pass- 
ing over or around ob- 
structions and doing 
the most thorough kind 
•of work. One of these 
gangs will plow from 
20 to 40 acres per day, 
•according to number of 
plows in gang, with the 
•employment of scarcely 
any manual labor. An- 
other important inven- 
tion which has been 
■successfully introduced 
T>y these brothers is an 
improved Harvesting 
Machine propelled by 
■steam power, the en- 
gine pushing one ma- 
chine or set of cutting 



knives in advance and drawing another in the 
rear, thus securing double capacity of work. 
These machines have been thoroughly tested 
and it has been found that the average day's 
work will harvest 60 acn s of grain. Arrange- 
ments are now being nr=de by the Messrs. 
Kimmel to commence the manufacture of 
the-e two improved varietes of farm machinery 
in Cambridge City upon an extensive scale 
and the enterprise and ability which the mem- 




66 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



bers of the firm have evinced in their other 
undertakings is a sufficient guarantee that 
their new industrial venture will prove an un- 
mistakable success and contribute in a still 
more marked degree to the development of 
the industrial and commercial resources of 
Wayne County and mark a new and eventful 
era in the history of agricultural progress in 
the United States. 



ment in this section. Mr. Emil Ebert is a 
native and lifelong resident of Indiana and 
was educated to the business in which he is- 
engaged and has ably maintained the position 
in commercial circles achieved by his father 
during a successful business career in this city- 
of more than two decades. 



C M. BAILEY, 

Watches, Jewelry, etc., 291 Main St. 
This store, at No. 291 Main St, is one of the 
most attractive and interesting of Cambridge 
City's numerous commercial establishment^ 
and in its appointments and its carefully 
selected stock will compare favorably with 
similar establishments in the metropolitan 
trade centers. In the handsome walnut and 
plate glass cases which adorn the walls are 
displayed a fine variety of clocks, solid silver 
and plated table ware, elegant articles of utility 
and adornment, suitable for bridal or holiday 
gifts, while the silver mounted plate glass 
counter cases, extending the entire length of 
the salesroom, are filled with the finest varie- 
ties of American and imported watches, jew- 
elry and silverware, spectacles, eve-glasses, 
rings, brooches, pins, chains, etc. Mr. Bailey 
established this house in 1S76, commencing 
without a dollar of capital but with a thor- 
ough knowledge of the trade. How well he 
has succeeded in his laudable endeavors may 
be inferred from the fact that the average 
valuation of his stock is not less than $5,000, 
while the annual transactions range from 
$15,000 to $20,000. Mr. Bailey is a native of 
Ripley County, Ind., where he was born in 
1S53. He is a practical watchmaker and jew- 
eler and devotes his personal attention to 
cleaning and repairing in every branch. 



EMIL. EBERT, 

Groceries, Glass and Queensware. 

Established originally in 1S5S upon a com- 
paratively small scale by Mr. Frank K. Ebert, 
this house passed into the possession of his 
son, Mr. Emil Ebert, in 1SS1, and each suc- 
ceeding season witnesses a gratifying increase 
in its trade, which is derived from both city 
and country. The salesroom, at No. 260 
Main St, in Ebert's Block, is 20x100 teet in 
dimensions and the stock carried is complete 
and comprehensive in every department, em- 
bracing a varied and extensive assortment 01 
staple and fancy groceries and family supplies, 
choice teas, co'V-es, sugars, spices, canned 
goods, fruits, vegetables, provisions, tobaccos, 
notions, grocers' sundries, queensware, glass- 
ware and the best varieties of field and garden 
seeds. Mr. Ebert is always prepared to re- 
ceive in exchange for his merchandise every 
kind of farm, dairy and country produce, for 
which he uniformly pays the highest ruling 
rates, and he cordially invites the attention of 
farmers and producers to his carefully selected 
stock and to a critical comparison "of prices 
with those of any contemporaneous establish- 



JOHN KEPLER, 
Loan Office. 
Mr. Kepler commenced life without means 
or capital. By the aid of friends he was- 
enabled to purchase a small farm on credit, 
and at the expiration of 15 years from taking- 
! possession thereof he had secured a clear title 
j to the property, had $15,000 out at interest and 
: had bought and paid for two other farms,, 
worth at least $10,000. Although he has had 
. his reverses and misfortunes, losing at one 
. time nearly $25 000 in cash by endorsing for 
I others, he has never lost heart or become dis- 
( couraged. He is the father of five children,, 
all of whom have arrived at years of maturity, 
and to each of these he has given $20,000. 
j Mr. Kepler has resided in this state since 1820, 
1 and from 1873 to 1S76 occupied the responsible 
j position of President of the First National 
I Bank in this city and since that time has 
devoted his attention to financial matters, 
loaning money upon approved securities and 
giving his personal attention to the manage- 
ment of his manifold interests in this section. 
He has now disposed of the greater portion of 
his real estate and landed interests, finding his. 
present occupation more congenial to his age,, 
inclinations and circumstances. He is an 
enthusiastic Democrat and exerts no incon- 
siderable influence in its councils in this 
section. Successful in the walks of business 
life, Mr. Kepler, now in the full enjoyment of 
a handsome competency, the results of his 
own efforts and integrity, has established for 
himself an unsullied; reputation and an un- 
questionable right to the position so universally 
accorded him as one of the representative self- 
made men of the "Hoosier" State. 



S. HARPER, 

Merchant Tailor, Main St. 
Mr. Harper, one of the oldest and best tailors 
in this section of the state, is a native of Ire- 
land, where he served a regular apprenticeship- 
at this business nearly half a century ago,, 
coming to this country in 1S37. Here he has 

I been employed in some of the largest and most 
fashionable establishments of our metropolitan 
cities, before coming to this city, about iS 
years ago. Two years after coming here he 
commenced business on his own account, and 
has secured an established patronage, embrac- 
ing many of the best citizens of this city and 
neighborhood. For sometime before coming 
to this city he resided in Covington, Ky.,. 
where he owned valuable property, which he 
sold prior to removing to this city ami estab- 
lishing his permanent home here. He car- 
ries in stock at his establishment, at 294 Main 

i St., at all times, an assortment of foreign and 



CAMBRIDGE CITY. 



67 



American cloths, cassimeres, meltons, suitings, 
etc., of various grades, suited to the wants of 
the trade, which are sold by the yard at lowest 
cash prices or made to order, according to the 
wish and taste of his patrons. His long ex- 
perience and natural adaptation to the business 
in which he is engaged insures to his 
patrons neat and perfect fits in all cases, with 
first class workmanship. He employs none 
but skilled workmen upon fine work and can 
therefore insure satisfaction. 



LEONARD MYERS, 
Wagon Maker. 

Mr. Leonard Myers has for the past quarter 
of a century furnished to the citizens of Wayne 
County a class of wagons which have received 
a verdict of universal approval, and has also 
during that period devoted special attention to 
repairing and general jobbing in wood and 
iron work. Mr. Myers occupies a lot 50x100 
feet in dimensions, upon which his shop, 20x26 
feet in size, is located, and gives his personal 
attention to all work turned out, manufactur- 
ing every description of wagons and guaran- 
teeing satisfaction, reasonable prices and 
conscientious workmanship. Mr. Myers was 
born at Baden, Germany, in 1S26, and came to 
the United States in 1S54. He is an experi- 
enced and thoroughly practical wagon and 
carriage maker and has been engaged in this 
special branch of business for the past 30 years, 
all of which time, with the exception of five 
years, he has spent in Cambridge City, where 
he is regarded as one of our most honorable 
and industrious mechanics and reliable busi- 
ness men. 



J- 



T. BAILEY, 
Confectionery, Fruit and Vegeta- 
bles, etc. 

Mr. J. T. Bailey, who has for the past 13 
years been a resident and respected merchant 
of Cambridge City, enlisted as a soldier in 
Company C, 4th Indiana Volunteer Infantry, 
Colonel W. A. Gorman commanding. The 
other field officers of the regiment were 
Lieutenant Colonel Dumont and Major Mc- 
Coy and the company was commanded by 
Captain M. L. Payne. Mr. Bailey served his 
full term of 16 months, participating in many 
of the most important and eventful campaigns 
and engagements of the war. Mr. Bailey, 
who is a native of Connecticut, was born May 
9th, 1S25, but has resided in Indiana since he 
was eight years of age. After his return and 
honorable discharge from service he engaged 
in mercantile pursuits and has for the past 35 
years been a highly esteemed and successful 
merchant. » The premises occupied by him are 
25x60 feet in dimensions, where is constantly 
carried a complete and comprehensive assort- 
ment of fine foreign and American fruits, 
confectioneries, vegetables, notions and similar 
merchandise, selected with an especial view to 
the requirements of the trade in this section. 



AUGUST BEYER, 

Bakery, West Main St. 
The establishment of Mr. August Beyers, 
located on West Main St., was originally 
started about five years ago and is now the 
leading house of its kind in this city. Mr. 
Beyers gives special attention to supplying 
the best fresh family bread, pies, cakes, rolls, 
crackers, etc., and is prepared to supply choice 
cakes for weddings or parties upon reasonable 
terms. He is a native of Germany but has 
been a resident of this country for many years. 
He has had a long practical experience in the 
business in which he is engaged and is capable 
of securing to his patrons the choicest varie- 
ties of articles pertaining to this department 
of trade. 

JOHN* MARSON, 
Gunsmith. 
Among the industrial avocations which 
characterize the business and mechanical 
operations of Cambridge City, we mention 
that of Mr. John Marson, who is a practical 
gunsmith and dealer in guns, pistols, amuni- 
tion and hunters' outfits. Mr. Marson is a 
native of England, where he was born in 1S17. 
He was regularly indentured to a gunsmith in 
his native country, where the most thorough 
and complete knowledge is exacted of ap- 
prentices. He has had a practical experience 
of over 30 years in this line of business and is 
an expert workman and manufacturer of rifles. 
He also gives special attention to every de- 
scription of repairs associated with fire arms. 

I. WEEKLY, 

Livery, Feed and Sale Stables, Cor. 

Main and Jones Sts. 
The stables conducted by Mr. I. Weekly 
have for many years been recognized as occu- 
pyinga leading position, on account of this well 
known stand having been used for general 
livery purposes over 20 years ago, at which 
time the business was established by Mr. 
George Hocune. During the interum this 
business has been carried on successively bv 
Valentine Sells, Oliver Loeder, Patterson ic 
Fletcher. The latter were succeeded in the 
business about nine years ago by Mr. Weekly, 
and with the exception of a few years, during 
which he suspended operations, has since re- 
mained in possession of these stables and con- 
tinued the business. The premises occupied 
embrace a ground space of 50x120 feet, the 
stables covering a ground space of 30x9c r 2 
feet, giving ample accommodations tor 65 
head of horses. Mr. Weekly keeps good stock 
and reliable driving horses and rigs, single or 
double, for the accommodation of pleasure- 
parties or for funeral occasions, and is pre- 
pared to convey commercial travelers or others 
to distant points upon most reasonable terms. 
His accommodations in this respect are not 
surpassed by any contemporaneous establish- 
ment in the* county. Horses are boarded by 
the {<;<:(], day or week and those having stock 
for sale or desiring to make purchases will do 



68 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



-well to avail themselves of Mr. Weekly's 
experience. Mr. Isaiah Weekly, the proprietor 
of these stables, is a native of this state and 
was born in 1S43. He has for many years 
been accustomed to handling stock. 



FRANK HATCH, 

Photographs, Tin-Types and Rubbrr 
Stamps. 

The only permanently established photo- 
graph and tin-type gallery in Cambridge is 
that conducted by Mr. Frank Hatch, on Main 
St, over Wright's furniture store, where a 
suite of rooms is fitted up with the latest im- 
pioved apparatus and appliances lor the pro- 
duction of the most artistic work in this special 
line of industrial art. In addition to the pho- 
tographic department, Mr. Hatch makes a 
specialty of furnishing rubber stamps of every 
description, for commercial purposes, marking 
clothing and a variety of uses, and in this 
branch of busiuess has a trade extending over 
a wide area of territory. Parties desiring any 
article in this line will consult their best inter- 
ests by calling upon or corresponding with 
Mr. Hatch, whose facilities for neat and expe- 
ditious work are not surpassed in this section. 
Mr. Hatch is a native and lifelong resident of 
this state and was born in 1S5S, and his present 
establishment was founded in 1SS0. 



A. W. BRADBURY, 

Hardware, Leather, Findings, etc. 
This business was originally established 
here about iS years ago, and as an indication 
or its growth, it may be stated that while its 
first year's busines's did not exceed $2,500, 
the transactions of the house at the present 
time will aggregate $20,000 per annum. The 
premises occupied embrace a three story brick 
building 20x120 feet in dimensions, in which 
is carried a full and complete stock of hard- 
ware, farmers' and mechanics' tools, table and 
pocket cutlery, housekeepers' goods, etc.; also 
leather, shoemakers' kit and findings, harness, 
etc. Mr. Bradbury also carries on a wood 
yard, in which he disposes of an average of 
600 cords of wood annually. The trade of this 
house embraces a circuit of from 16 to 20 
miles, and in the various departments of his 
business Mr. Bradbury gives employment to 



from five to six assistants. The energy and 
judicious business policy associated with the 
transactions of this house have largely contri- 
buted to the material prosperity and business 
activities of this citv. 



CASPER SCHAFER, 

Stoves andnTinware. 

At the establishment of Mr. Casper Schafer, 
on East Main St., may always be found a 
complete stock of the best varieties of heating 
and cooking stoves from the leading manufac- 
turers of the Union, adapted for either coal or 
wood, ranges, grates, hollow ware, tin, copper 
and sheet iron utensils for domestic or com- 
mercial purposes, of his own manufacture, and 
a general line of house furnishing goods and 
general merchandise pertaining to this special 
department of industry and trade. Mr. Scha- 
fer commenced business at his present loca- 
tion in March, 18S1. He makes a specialty of 
manufacturing every description of tin, cop- 
per and sheet iron ware and devotes particular 
attention to roofing, guttering, spouting and 
general jobbing. Mr. Schafer is a native of 
Virginia and was born in the city of Martins- 
burg in 1S59. He is a practical tinsmith and 
worker in metals, and although yet a young 
man, has had considerable experience in this 
special line. 



The other more important firms here are as 
follows: — F. C. Mosbaugh, Postmaster and 
publisher Tribune; Mason & Holderman, 
hardware; A. C. Hollowell, stoves; H. Inger- 
man, brewer; S. P. Herrington, harness; W. 
Doney & Son, cigars; J. B. Routh, dry goods; 
J. J. McCarthy, marble works, D. Drischel, 
grocer; C. W. Routh, livery ; First National 
Bank; Myers Bros., meats; J. Griesinger, 
tailor; T. Frohnapfel, grocer; F. L. Wheeler, 
boots, shoes; E. C.Rudy, cigars; L. Swiggett 
& Son, tailors; Hotel Kirby ; W. Dale, grocer; 
S. A. Trembly, dry goods; C. Lackey, livery; 
Shults, Roth & Co., grain; Vinton House; S. 
H. Hoshorn, insurance; B. F. Dreschel, gro- 
cer; McCaffrey & Son, drugs; Western 
Wayne Bank; A. Jenks, jeweler; C.B.Elliott; 
general store; J. H. Finfrock, planing mill; 
F. Rurnmel & Co., wagons; M. M. Callaway, 
druss; Roth & Co., lumber. 



CENTREVILLE 



This once promising town was laid out 
in 1814, and for some years occupied the 
leading position among the important 
trade centers of this section of the state. 
The- name was given to it from its central 
position in the county and upon the grad- 
ual settlement of the territory this place 
soon laid claim to the county seat, which 
it succeeded in wresting from Salsbury in 
1816, after a comparitively desperate 
' struggle, and which in time was wrested 
from it about 1870 after a far more des- 
perate effort and bitter conflict. 

The first court was held here January 
28th, 1818, in a fine new court house 
built by subscription without expense to 
county. Among the first papers published 
here was the Western Emporium, pub- 
lished by John Scott. 



The town had a comparatively rapid 
growth for a few years and in 1870 had 
a population of 1,077 with fine schools 
and public buildings, but the removal of 
the capitol had a depressing effect upon 
its commercial prospects and general 
growth so that in 1880 it only had a pop- 
ulation of 875. 

Surrounded by a rich agricultural sec- 
tion it yet possesses vitalizing power 
which will always make it a good trading 
point, especially while it contains as it 
now does many enterprising merchants, 
business men and some manufacturing 
operations. It enjoys the advantages of 
a good school building, several fine chur- 
ches, two hotels and the reputation of the 
most healthy section of the state. 



M. T. JOHNSTON, 

Groceries and Provisions, Main St. 
The establishment now owned and con- 
trolled by the enterprising gentleman whose 
name heads this sketch is one of the oldest 
and best known houses in Wayne County, 
dating its inception to 1852, when it was 
founded bv William Morton and Thomas 
Noble. Mr. Morton was a half brother of 
Indiana's well known Governor, the Hon. 
Oliver P. Morton. Later in the history of the 
house the business was controlled by Christian 
Failor, who was succeeded in March, 1SS3, by 
the present proprietor. The fact that the trade 
of the house has been doubled since the last 
named date is sufficient proof of Mr. John- 
ston's mercantile ability. His stock is full and 
complete in every particular and comprises a 
full line of staple and fancy groceries, coffees, 
teas, sugars, spices, provisions, country pro- 
duce, glass and queensware, crockery, etc. 
He occupies a commodious brick structure on 
Main St., two stories in height and 32x50 feet 
dimensions, and in addition to his personal 
attention, he keeps one assistant in constant 
employ. Fresh and pure goods and satisfac- 



tory prices will always be found in Mr. John- 
ston's establishment and customers invariably 
receive prompt and polite attention. Mr. 
Johnston is a native of Virginia and was born 
in 1S-14. He settled in Indiana when quite 
young and is an old resident of Wayne Countv. 
"By his agreeable and affable manner, his in- 
tegrity and business ability, he has succeeded 
in forming a large circle of personal friends, 
and his high standing in the mercantile com- 
munity, together with the strictly honorable 
business policy that characterizes his trans- 
actions, makes the permanency and success of 
his house doubly sure. 



S. C DOUGHTY, 

General Merchandise. 
This house dates its inception to 1S6S, when 
it was founded by its present enterprising pro- 
prietor, and each succeeding year has been 
marked by a gradually increasing trade. The 
premises occupied are 50x150 feet in dimen- 
sions, in a substantial three storv brick build- 
ing, known as "Odd Fellow's Block." Three 
competent employes are constantly required 
to attend to the wants of the many "patrons of 



70 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



the house, and purchasers invariably receive 
prompt and polite attention. The stock of 
general merchandise carried by Mr. Doughty, 
although very extensive, is complete in every 
particular. In the line of dry goods, he car- 
ries a full line ot fancy dress goods, millinery 
goods, hosiery, etc., in all of which he is pre- 
pared to otter special inducements to the 
public. His stock of staple and fancy grocer- 
ies is full in every particular, always pure and 
fresh and for sale at bottom prices. In the 
line of notions, hats, caps, boots, shoes and 
furnishing goods of every description, he is 
prepared to supply the wants of everybody. 
His trade extends throughout the city and sur- 
rounding country districts and can be com- 
pared with that of any similar establishment 
in this part of the state. To control a business 
so extensive and in which so many varieties 
of goods are handled, requires mercantile 
ability of no small degree, but Mr. Doughty is 
entirely adequate to the task and has suc- 
ceeded in gaining the entire confidence and 
esteem of the community. He is a native of 
Centreville and was born in 1S40. He is relia- 
ble in all his transactions and is fully entitled 
to the brief space allotted to him in our work 
setting forth the industries and resources of 
Centreville. 



MARCELLUS BEITZEL, 
Stoves and Tinware. 
Mr. Beitzel established the business in which 
he is still engaged about 15 vears ago, and by 
enterprise and thrift he has succeeded in build- 
ing up a trade which is both permanent and 
lucrative. He deals in stoves, tinware, house 
house furnishing goods, copper and sheet iron 
ware, etc., and is prepared to do roofing, spout- 
ing, guttering and general job work. His 
stock is of superior qualily and his prices and 
terms are reasonable and satisfactory. He 
occupies a room 18x40 feet in dimensions, and 
in addition to his personal attention his busi- 
ness necessitates the constant services of a 
competent assistant. His work never fails to 
give satisfaction and Mr. Beitzel is an agreea- 
ble and strictly hononorable gentleman, with 
•whom it is both pleasureable and profitable to 
deal. He is a native of Fayette County, Ind., 
and was born in 1S43. 

J. VV. KEYS & CO., 

Harness Manufacturer. 
As manufacturers of and dealers in fine 
harness, the firm of J. W. Keys & Co. has 
attained an enviable reputation, by reason of 
the uniform jeliability, elegant finish and sub- 
stantial nature of the various articles turned 
out by them. The house was established 
about 13 years ago by J. W. Keys, but it has 
been known by its present name and style 
since 1S76. They occupy a room 34x16 feet in 
dimensions, keep constantly on hand a large 
and well selected stock. They manufacture 
double carriage harness, which they are pre- 
pared to sell at prices ranging from"$23 to $65 
per set, double work harness at from $25 to 



$45 and single light harness at from $13 to $45. 
It will be seen by these figures that their 
prices are uniformly low and satisfactory, and 
the members of the firm being experienced 
and practical harness makers, they are pre- 
pared to give their patrons the fullest possible 
guarantee of satisfaction. Mr. J. W. Keys is 
a native of Highland County, O., and was 
born in 1S16. He has resided in Indiana since 
1S3S and is one of our most highly respected 
citizens. His competent and efficient partner, 
Mr. Charles Means, is a native of Indiana and 
was born in 1S53. Both ar e genial and affable 
gentlemen, with whom it is a pleasure to deal. 



AMERICAN HOUSE, 

E. F. Harmer, Proprietor, 
This is the leading hotel in Centreville, it 
being, in fact, the only regular and well estab- 
lished hotel in the city. The building is a 
substantial brick, two stories in height, and 
has been under its present able and 'efficient 
management for two years. The building 
contains 17 rooms, all neatly and comfortably 
furnished, and 75 persons can be satisfactorily 
accommodated. On the first floor we find the 
office, reading, writing and wash rooms, 
kitchen and a large and neatly furnished 
dining room, in which the above-mentioned 
number of persons can be comfortably seated. 
On the second floor is an attractivelv fur- 
nished parlor for the accommoJation of'ladies 
and a number of tidy and homelike sleeping 
apartments. In all respects we can safely say 
that the American house is amply provided 
for the accommodation of the traveling public. 
The table is always supplied with substantial 
and delicacies, served according to the most 
approved methods of modern cookerv. To 
the wants and comforts ot the stranger, 
prompt and polite attention is given. The 
rates tor transient guests are but $1 per day 
and regular boarders are accommodated at the 
extremely low rate of S3. 50 per week. Mr. 
Harmer, the genial proprietor, is a native of 
Pennsylvania and was born six miles from the 
old historic field oi Gettvsburs:. He has been 



a resident ot Indiana for 



six years. 



J. A. DUNBAR & CO., 

Groceries and Agricultural Imple- 
ments, etc.. Main Sr. 
This house was established by the present 
proprietors about three years ago and since 
that time the trade has been constantly on the 
increase, until now the annual sales aggregate 
not less than $20,000. The premises occupied 
comprise what was at one time the Sheriff's 
office, jury room, etc., in the old Court House. 
The building is a substantial two story brick 
structure, 42x60 feet in dimensions, conveni- 
ently arranged, and is the leading business 
house of Centreville. The stock carried is 
very full and complete in every particular and 
comprises a fine line of staple and fancy family 
groceries, pure teas, coffees and sugar, canned 
goods, fruits and nuts, country produce, fresh 
dairy products, vegetables, etc., together with 



CENTREVILLE. 



71 



a fine stock of queensware, chinaware and all 
kinds of agricultural implements. One assist- 
ant is employed and the trade of the house 
extends throughout the town and adjoining 
country. The individual members of the firm 
are Mr. J. A. Dunbar and Mrs. S. E. Dunbar, 
both natives of Wayne County, the former 
having been born in 1S56. 



R. WARD & SON, 

Manufacturers of Ward's Liniment. 
Mr. WarJ began the business that has 
secured for him a snug competency and at 
the same time made him justly famous, in 
1850. Ward's celebrated liniment is used 
throughout tUe West for both man and beast. 
for internal and external purposes, and is war- 
ranted to give full satisfaction for what is 
recommended. It is put up in bottles of dif- 
ferent sizes, sold respectively for 25 cents, 50 
cents and $ too. per bottle, according to size 
Full directions accompanying each bottle are 
given to the purchaser, and judging from the 
large number of testimonials betore us, we can 
safely assert that no remedy known to medi- 
cal science is so deservedly popular. Among 
the many vouchers of its efficincy is our well 
known townsman, Mr. J. Crawford, a son of 
W. W, Crawford, chair manufacturer. While 
in the pursuit of his business, Mr. Crawford's 
foot was caught under the wheel of a heavily 
loaded wagon, and although no bones were 
broken, the foot was so badly bruised that the 
blood gushed forth copiously from under his 
toe-nails. No other remedy at hand, the foot 
was bound up in cloths, saturated with Ward's 
Liniment, and by the next morning Mr. C. 
■was able to pursue his work with little or no 
soreness. This statement may seem incredu- 
lous, but it was made by Mr. C. to the writer, 
Mr. C. not knowing that we would make use 
©t the information. The remedy is sold by 
the leading druggists throughout the land and 
many physicians of high standing in the medi- 
cal profession use it in their daily practice. 
Although Mr. Ward offers a reward of $500 



to any man that will produce a liniment that 
will excel or even equal his preparation, vet 
he need not fear that the reward will ever' be 
called for. Mr. Ward is a native of Butler 
County, O., and was born in 1819. 

L. F. WILLIAMS, 

General Merchandise, Main St. 
This is one of the leading houses in the 
merchandising line in this place and as such is 
entitled to a favorable and more than ordinary 
notice in a comprehensive work of this de-crip"- 
tion. The business was established bv its 
present proprietor six years ago and ha's be- 
come a permanent and'praiseworthy mercan- 
tile house. Mr. Williams occupies asalesroom 
18x80 feet in dimensions and carries a stock 
comprising a full and complete assortment of 
dry goods, boots, shoes, notions, hats, caps, 
furnishing goods, etc. He devotes his per- 
sonal attention to his business, in addition to 
which the services of two competent and effi- 
cient salesmen are constantly required. His 
goods are tastefully arranged and his patrons 
receive prompt and polite attention. His trade 
has increased largely since the date of its in- 
ception and is still growing in a manner that 
is highly satisfactory and encouraging. His 
prices are uniformly low and satisfactory and 
the public find it to their interest to examine 
his goods and prices before purchasing else- 
where. Mr. Williams was born in Favette 
County, Ind., in 1S4S, and we can safelv say- 
that no merchant in Centreville rates higher 
as to integrity and mercantile ability. 

The following are the principal firms here 
not already mentioned: 

First National Bank, Edmunds Chair Co., 
Rising Sun Flouring Mills, Jos. Commons, 
saw mill; Park Hotel, II. C. Leeson; grocer; 
R. S. ShofY, livery; Richet & Reed, drugs; 
Martha E. Greene, postmistress and books; 
Mary E. Bersh, bakery; Mrs. C. E. Tuttle, 
millinery; Harvey & Squires, meats; Wm. 
Mathews, cigars, etc. 



HAGERSTOWN. 



Previous to the location and laying out 
of this now thriving place, there had been 
located in the vicinity of the present 
Hagerstown Mills a town containg a gro- 
cery store and a few other buildings, of 
which there is now nothing left but an 
indistinct memory. The records show 
that Hagerstown was originally laid out 
by Jacob Ulrich and Jonas Harris, on 
March 8, 1832, though additions have 
since been made. Among the earliest 
settlers in this place may be noticed 
Archibald Knode, Geo. Beck, Jacob Ul- 
rich, Geo. Debolt, Joshua Hull, David 
Weaver, Greenbury Savoy, Geo. Gillispie, 
Wm. Baker and Dr. Thomas Buchanan. 
The first house erected within the present 
city limits, was built by Jonas Harris. 
The first blacksmith shop was carried on 
by Henry Harris. The first store was 
kept by Joseph Hawkins and the first 
postmaster here was Win. Baker. 



THE TOWN 

is nicely laid out and contains a popula- 
tion of between 800 and 900 inhabitants. 
There are a number of fine public build- 
ings and private residences among which 
may be mentioned the Town Hall and 
Academy. There are four churches, viz: 
Christian, Desciple, Presbyterian and 
Methodist Episcopal. There are three 
lodges, F. & A. M., I. O. O. F., and G. A. 
R. The Hagerstown Exponent is a weekly 
paper with a good local circulation in 
this section of the county. The Wayne 
County Farmer is a monthly quarto hav- 
ing a circulation of over 2,000 copies. 
Both are edited and published by H. J. 
Day. The northern terminus of the 
White Water Valley Railroad is here, 
and intersects the Pan Handle Railroad. 
In its railroads and excellent water power 
this place enjoys very good manufactur- 
ing and shipping facilities and has a 
prosperous and growing trade. 



COMMERCIAL BANK. 

The first bank established in Hagerstown 
was known as the "Citizens' Bank" and was 
founded in 1S75 D 7 Dr. Ford and Mr. John 
Allen, and was continued under their manage- 
ment for about four years. In 1S79 the Com- 
mercial Bank was orginizeJ, with Messrs. 
Brook and Ford as bankers for a brief period, 
when they were succeeded by Messrs. Wyatt, 
Allen & Co. The present proprietors first 
assumed the management and control of the 
Commercial Bank in August, 1800, since 
which time it has taken a prominent rank 
among the most reliable financial institutions 
of Eastern Indiana. As a private banking 
company, under the designating title above 
given, this firm transacts a general" banking 
business, receive deposits, negotiate commer- 
cial paper with approved securities, attend 
to collections, issue exchange and drafts on all 
the principal cities and transact all business 
legitimately pertaining to a first class institu- 
tion of this description. The officers of the 
Commercial Bank as at present organized are 
B. F. Mason, President; John Bowman, Cash- 
ier, and F. L. Allen, Assistant Cashier. The 
management of affairs under the present effi- 



cient management has been characterized by 
a safe, conservative yet liberal policy. 

HAGERSTOWN SAW AND PLANING 
MILLS, 
Werking & Co., Proprietors. 
Among the thoroughly equipped saw and 
planing mills of the present day we refer to- 
the Hagerstown Saw and Planing Mills, now- 
owned and conducted by Messrs. Werking &. 
Co. These mills were originally started by 
Zachariah and Jacob Teetor in"iS65, but in 
June, 1SS2, Mr. Z. Teetor withdrew, at which 
time the firm became Teetor, Werking & Co., 
and so remained up to October, 1883, at which 
time Mr. Jacob Teetor withdrew and the firm 
became as at present. This firm is composed 
of William Werking, J. M. Werking and 
Henry Keagv. Each member of the firm are 
energetic business men, and all except Mr. 
Henry Keagy are natives of this state and ac- 
tively participate in the business connected 
with these mills and the operations of the 
business of this house. The firm are con- 
tractors and builders and enjoy unsurpassed 
facilities for the prompt and efficient execu- 
tion of all work of this character. They are 



HAGERSTOWN. 



85 



prepared to take contracts for the entire con- 
struction of public buildings, church edifices 
or private residences of any description and 
will furnish designs and specifications when it 
i* desired. The buildings are substantially 
built, principally of brick, and cover a ground 
6pace of 50x130 feet. It is provided with the 
newest improved machinery, being propelled 
by a 30 horse power engine and employment 
given to an average of 10 hands. The prem- 
ises and space occupied for handling and storing 
lumber, logs, timber, etc., embraces a ground 
space of nearly four acres. The firm are pre- 
pared to execute all kinds of job work in this 
line or to supply contractors' or builders' arti- 
cles of this character at rates which will bear 
comparison with any contemporaneous estab- 
lishment of the kind in the state. The annual 
transactions of this house will reach at least 
$20,000 and their field of operations cover a 
wide circuit of country, in which they have 
been able to successfully compete with other 
cities and towns. They make it a point to 
execute promptly all work committed to them 
and guarantee honest and faithful work, ac- 
cording to recognized designs or specifications. 



NEWCOM HOUSE, 

C. Newcom, Proprietor, Maim St. 
The leading hotel in this section of Wayne 
County is the Newcom House, which under 
its present management reflects credit upon 
its proprietors, as well as upon the city of 
Hagerstown. This house was built and occu- 
pied by Mr. N. Cheeseman in 1865 and since 
that time it has passed into the control of 
various parties, among whom we mention I. 
Cornelius, Clifton & Rockhill, who were suc- 
ceeded by Mrs. C. Newcom in 18S1. The 
popularity this house enjoys, both at home 
and abroad, is a sufficient indication of the 
success attained. The house contains 25 
rooms, which are neatly furnished and cleanly 
kept, affording accommodations for 40 guests, 
and the dining room has a seating capacity of 
30 guests at one time. The culinary depart- 
ment is in charge of competent and experienced 
cooks, and the table is provided with the best 
the market affords at all times. First class sam- 
ple rooms are provided for the use of commer- 
cial travelers. Mrs. C. Newcom is ably assisted 
by her two sons, Daniel A. Byrd and Charles 
L. Newcom, through whose attention guests 
are assured as nearly home comforts as hotel 
life can provide. 



E. BOWMAN, 

Groceries and Provisions and Gen- 
eral Merchandise. 
Among the comparatively recent accessions 
to the grocery trade in this city is the house ot 
Mr. Ed. Bowman, who opened his present 
6tore in Jan., 1SS3. Here he occupies a well 
arranged business room, 17x50 feet in size, 
with cellar, and carries a full and complete 
stock of staple and fancy groceries and pro- 
visions, fruits, confectioneries, tobaccos, cigars, 



notions, etc. His stock is selected with special 
reference to the trade of this locality, and the 
care exercised in buying from producers and 
the best jobbing houses in the country ena- 
bles him to successfully compete with any 
similar house in this section. Mr. Bowman 
is a native of Wayne County, this state, where 
he was born in 1S63. Since establishing his 
business here his trade has gradually increased 
and now embraces many of the bes't and most 
substantial residents of this city and vicinity. 

H. MATHEWS & SON, 

Proprietors Hagerstown City Grain- 
Elevator and Dealers in Agricul- 
tural Implements, Main St. 
Among the most important of Hagerstown's 
commercial activities and business operations 
is the handling of grain, seeds and agricultural 
implements, as condncted by the enterprising- 
firm of H. Mathews & Son./proprietors of the 
Hagerstown City Elevator, with office three 
doors west of Plum St., on Main. This enter- 
prise was inaugurated by the senior member 
of the present firm, who came to this citv 
from Cincinnati in 1S51. The premises occu- 
pied at this time comprise a lot 100x220 teet in 
dimensions, upon which is erected a commo- 
dious elevator and warehouse. The elevator 
is 50x50 feet in dimensions, three stories in 
height and has a storage capacity of 10,000 
bushels. Messrs. Mathews & Son handle 
annually not less than 50,000 bushels of wheat, 
12,000 bushels of corn and large quantities of 
clover seed, buying and shipping annually 
more of the latter commodity than all other 
dealers in the city combined. During the 
winter season this firm also deals extensiveiv 
in live hogs. In addition to the special 
branches of business above enumerated, thev 
also deal extensively in agricultural and farm- 
ing tools, implements and machinery of the 
most approved varieties. The individual 
members of the firm are Messrs. H. and Wil- 
liam G. Mathews. The former, a native of 
New York, was born in 1S17. He has been 
for many years identified with the grain trade 
of this and other cities. 



DILLING & CO., 

Drugs and Medicines, Main St. 
The business of this house was originally 
established about 12 years ago, under the firm 
name of Walker & Dilling, who were suc- 
ceeded by Messrs. Walker & Pierce, subse- 
quently by Dilling & Pierce, who continued 
the business up to 1S77, at which time the 
present proprietors, consisting of Mr. D. Dil- 
ling and J. M. Thurston, came into control of 
the business and the present firm name was 
adopted. The house occupies a fine business 
room, 20XS5 feet in dimensions, in a two storv 
brick building, where the general store is 
devoted to a hne selection of pure drugs and 
chemicals, all popular and desirable patent 
medicines of the day, perfumeries and toilet 
articles, choice tobaccos and cigars, notions, 

G 



86 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



etc. Pure wines and liquors are kept for 
medical purposes, while in the rear is the pre- 
scription department, to which special atten- 
tion is given in the careful and accurate 
preparation of physicians' prescriptions and 
family recipes, in which none but the purest 
ingredients are used. Mr. D. Dilling is a 
native of Wayne County, this state, where he 
was born in 1S45. Dr. J. M. Thurston is a 
native of Ohio, but has been a resident of 
Hagerstown for the past 12 years. He is a 
regular graduate of physio-medical school of 
physicians and surgeons and has for many 
years been engaged in the practice of medicine 
and surgery, in which he still continues. Mr. 
Dilling conducts in his own name a depart- 
ment devoted to refreshments, confectioneries, 
ice cream, soda water, etc., in their season. 



WIMMERS' MARBLE WORKS, 
Main St. 
Among those establishments engaged in 
monumental work, whose perfection of execu- 
tion and designs entitles to prominent men- 
tion, we notice Wimmers' Marble Works, of 
Hagerstown, in which may at all times be 
found finely executed specimens of sculptured 
art, which will compare favorably with any 
contemporaneous establishment in the coun- 
try. The business ot this house was origi- 
nally established about 30 years ago in a 
comparatively small way and was then con- 
ducted by Mr. E. B. Hathaway. With credita- 
ble improvement and progress the business has 
been continued, and in February, 18S3, came 
into the control of Messrs E. M. and W. R. 
Wimmer, taking the name of Wimmers' Mar- 
ble Works. These gentlemen are thoroughly 
skilled marble workers and are prepared to 
execute the most elaborate designs or to fur- 
nish original designs to those who may desire. 
In marble or granite they are prepared to 
furnish, on reasonable notice, according to job 
to be done, all grades of monumental work, 
vaults, slabs, headstones, etc., ranging in prices 
from $5 to $5,000, and guarantee all work 
executed in exact accordance w ith designs and 
specifications. These gentlemen are natives 
of this state and with the advantages of native 
skill and experience cannot fail to fully meet 
the requirements in this important department 
of industrial art. 



DANIEL W. TEETOR, 

Wagon and Carriage Works, One 
and One-Half Miles Northwest of 
Hagerstown. 
Mr. Teetor is a native of this county, where 
he was born in 1S54. After completing his 
early education he learned the trade of wagon 
maker, at which he has spent many years. 
About seven years ago he established his pres- 
ent works, where he is prepared to execute to 
order every description of work in this line, 
but gives more special attention to fine car- 
riages and buggies, spring wagons and all 
kinds of repairing in connection. He uses 



nothing but the best seasoned timber and 
other materials and guarantees all work turned 
out by him. He carries on each department, 
including ironing, painting, trimming, etc., 
and the excellence of his workmanship, as well 
as his reasonable charges, have secured to him 
an established and successful business. 

SHIVELY & SONS^ 

Agricultural Implements and Ma- 
chinery, Hardware, Lumber and 
Lath, etc. 
This house dates its origin to 1S69, at which 
time the business was started in a compara- 
tively small way and has been developed to its 
present proportions through the energy and 
business ability of its founder. In 1879 this 
firm erected a fine t,vo story brick block, 
which is a credit to this city and to the enter- 
prise of its owners and builders. This build- 
ing is 40x100 feet in size, with an addition of 
40x40 feet. The room occupied for the busi- 
ness purposes of this firm is 20x100 feet in 
size and is devoted to general hardware, farm- 
ers' and mechanics' tools, table and pocket 
cutlery, house keepers' goods, etc. They also 
carry on a lumber yard, where they keep in 
stock plain and dressed lumber, lath, shingles, 
doors, sash, blinds, etc. They also handle the 
best makes and latest improved agricultural 
implements, having such arrangements with 
manufacturers as enables them to guarantee 
to farmers as liberal terms as can be obtained 
of any contemporaneous house in the state. 
This house is the largest of its class in the 
city and the transactions will average about 
$35,000 per annum, with trade chiefly confined 
to the western and northern parts of Wayne 
Coun.tv. The individual members of the firm 
are J. Shively, F. H. Shively and William T. 
Shively, each of whom are 'thoroughly practi- 
cal and reliable business men. 



ALEXANDER C. WALKER, 

Post Master and Dealer in Books, 

Stationery, etc. 
For 14 years the Hagerstown Post Office 
has been acceptably managed by the present ' 
efficient Post Master, Mr. Alexander C. 
Walker, whose tenure of office commenced 
under the first year of President Grant's Ad- 
ministration. Mr. Walker is a native and 
lifelong resident of Indiana and was born in 
184a Since attaining his majority he has 
taken an activeand intelligent interest in pub- 
lic affairs, both local, state and national, and 
has been a prominent, influential and enthusi- 
astic advocate of the time honored principles 
of the great Republican party. In addition to 
his duties as Post Master, Mr. Walker con- 
ducts a well stocked book and stationery store 
in the same building as the Post Office, where 
the public will always find a fine assortment 
of standard and miscellaneous books in the 
various departments of literature, school books, 
commercial and epistolary stationery and all 
the requisites for school, library and office 



HAGERSTOWN. 



87 



purposes. Mr. Walker is one of our most 
highly esteemed and public spirited citizens 
and enjoys a wide and influential circle of 
acquaintances in both public and private life 
throughout Wayne County. 

ALLEN & CO., 

Druggists; Books, Stationery, etc. 
The present business had its origin about 19 
years ago, at which time it was established by 
Dr. H. Lenardson, and Solomon Miller, about 
1863, Mr. Miller retiring after nine months. 
Mr. Lenardson conducted it for about tour 
years, when Thomas L. Allen and Dr. 
Mathews purchased the business and con- 
ducted it for two or three years, and after the 
death of Mr. Mathews, in 1S71, the interest 
was held by his widow up to January 1st, 1S78. 
At this date her interest was purchased by 
Dr. J. B. Allen, the firm name as at present 
being still retained. On August 6th, 1883, 
Mr. Thomas Allen retired, the business com- 
ing entirely under the control of the present 
proprietor. The premises occupied embrace 
a room 22x65 ^ eet m dimensions, in which is 
carried a full stock of pure drugs and chemi- 
cals, all popular and desirable proprietary 
medicines, perfumeries and toilet articles, fine 
tobaccos and cigars, notions, etc. In the rear 
is the prescription department, where special 
pains are taken in the preparation of physi- 
cians' prescriptions and family recipes. One 
department of the store is devoted to a full 
line of wall papers, school books and miscella- 
neous books, stationery, etc. Dr. J. B. Allen, 
the present proprietor of this house, is also 
agent for the Adams Express Company. He 
is a native of this county, where he was born 
in 1844. After studying medicine and sur- 
gery, he graduated from the Ohio Medical 
College, at Cincinnati, O., in 1SS1, and is now 
engaged in the practice of his profession. 



mings, etc., of newest goods are always carried 
in stock, and the trimming department is 
always presided over by an accomplished 
artist in this line. Mr. David P. Slifer wa> 
born in Fredrick County, Md., in 1S14, but has 
resided in this state since 1845. 



DAVID P. SLIFER, 

Dry Goods, Millinery Goods, No- 
tions, Trimmings, etc., Perry St. 
About 25 years ago Mr. Slifer commenced 
business in this city in the general clothing 
line, while his wife conducted a millinery store 
in the adjoining room. The business was con- 
tinued in this way for five or six years, when 
the two stores were thrown into one and the 
clothing business gradually abandoned and a 
general stock of dry goods, notions, etc., sub- 
stituted, since which time the^e branches have 
constituted the stock of the establishment. 
The premises now occupied embrace a fine 
business room, 26 feet square, in which is car- 
ried a full line of foreign and domestic dry 
goods, notions, fancy goods, etc., while the 
millinery department will always be found an 
attractive feature during the season, on account 
of the ability of this house to secure newest 
styles and designs in pattern hats and bonnets 
simultaneous with their appearance in our 
metropolitan cities. Fine French and Ameri- 
can flowers, feathers, plumes, ribbons, trim- 



FUNK & JEMISON, 

Manufacturers of Carriages, Bug- 
gies, Ph.«tons, Spring Wagons and 

BUCKBOARDS, ETC., PERRY St. 

The wagon and carriage shops of Messrs. 
Funk & Jemison were originally started by 
Mr. W. O. Barr in iSj6and conducted by him 
up to April 1st, 1S83, at which time the' pre-' 
ent firm became the proprietors. Mes^rs. 
Funk & Jemison now control the only car- 
riage works in this city and are prepared to 
execute orders for any description of spring 
wagons, carriages and buggies and can guaran- 
tee not only fine and finished workmanship, 
but also as low prices as can be obtained for 
work of equal value and reliability in any 
establishment in the state. They give special 
attention to repairing in every branch, includ- 
ing painting, trimming and iron work. They 
give employment during the busy season to 
from four to six assistants and transact a busi- 
ness which will approximate $5,000 per 
annum. These gentlemen are both natives 
of this state and have had that thorough 
practical experience which justly entitles them 
to the confidence and patronage of the entire 
community. 



D. CHEESMAN. 

Main Street Meat Market. 
The present enterprise of Mr. Cheesman 
was started about three years ago by Messrs. 
Berry & Parsons, who were succeeded in 
March, 1SS3, by the present proprietor. Mr. 
David Cheesman is a native of this county 
and thoroughly understands the business in 
which he is engaged. He carries at all times 
the choicest fresh meats in the market, with 
bologna, sausages and fish in their season. 
He slaughters nothing but sound and healthy 
stock and guarantees the lowest living prices 
to patrons. The energy and attention given 
to this department by this gentleman is worthy 
the liberal notice here accorded, and the lib- 
eral patronage of the public he already enjoy s. 
He was born in this county in 1S46 and was 
raised upon a farm up to the time of com- 
mencing his present enterprise. 



W. H. PITMAN, 

Boots and Shoes. 
Mr. Pitman is a native of Cambridge City, 
where he was born April 4th, 1S40. Since 
completing his literary education he has been 
associated with business life and enjoys a wide 
and large acquaintance in this and adjoining 
counties. He was formerly engaged in busi- 
ness in Cambridge and came to this place in 
December, 1S62, where he was employed up 
to the time of commencing, business on his 



88 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



own account. He enjoys an enviable reputa- 
tion, both in business and political circles. He 
is now serving his second term as a member 
of the City Council of this place, and in this 
enterprise, established in 1SS3, enjoys those 
comprehensive facilities which must enable 
h m to successfully compete with any con- 
temporaneous house in the county. The 
premises occupied embrace a room 1SX35 feet 
in dimensions, in which Mr. Pitman carries a 
full stock of boots and shoes, for men, women, 
boys, misses or children, selected with direct 
reference to the requirements of the town and 
country traJe. He also keeps a practical 
workman and conducts a first class custom 
department, where work will be promptly 
done to order in the neatest manner, and good 
fits will be, in all cases, guaranteed, as well as 
good stock and good styles. Repairing will 
be neatly and promptly done. 



TEETOR MACHINE WORKS, 
Lewis W. Teetor, Proprietor. 
The Teetor Machine Works are located on 
Nettle Creek, about three-quarters of a mile 
south ot Hagerstown, and occupy the site of 
an old grist mill, which was known as the first 
grist mill in this section of the state. Nearly 
•25 years ago (in 1S65) this mill was remodeled 
by Mr. Daniel Teetor and fitted up as a saw 
mill ami machine shop, and both branches 
have been since carried on. In 1S76 Mr. 
Lewis W. Teetor, a son of Daniel, succeeded 
to the business and has since then given more 
special attention to the machinery department, 
although the mill still has facilities for sawing 
lumber to order. The motive power is fur- 
nished by water from Nettle Creek. The 
machine works and mill embrace a building 
40x60 feet in dimensions, the main works be- 
ing devoted to every description of machine 
work and especially to general job work and 
repairing, such as are incident to this section. 
The proprietor, Mr. Lewis W. Teeter, is a 
native of this county and was born in 1845. 
He is a practical machinist and possesses that 
ingenuity and skill which becomes of the 
highest value in this department. 

MRS. LIDA BALDWIN, 

Millinery and Dressmaking. 
In March, 1SS3, Mrs. Lida Baldwin opened 
this establishment, where she occupies a room 
conveniently located for the requirements of 
these branches. During the season she car- 
ries a full and complete stock of fashionable 
hats and bonnets, ribbons, flowers, feathers 
and popular trimmings. She is always care- 
ful to >ecure the latest styles of the season and 
exercises the choicest discrimination in adapt- 
ing colors and styles to the complexion and 
features of the wearer. She is also careful 
to consult economy with those who desire to 
exercise it, thus being able, often, to produce 
attractive and tasteful hats and bonnets to 
meet the desires of her patrons. In the dress 
making department she guarantees not only 



neatness, taste and pood fits, but good work- 
manship and reasonable prices. Mrs. Baldwin 
is a native of this state, and the superior taste 
exercised, both in dress making and in the 
trimming department of both branches, will 
strongly commend her to> the refined and cul- 
tivated in city and country. 

M. E. CHAM NESS, 

Watchmaker and Jeweler. 
This is the only establishment in Hagers- 
town that carries a full assortment of articles 
appertaining to the jewelTy trade. The house 
was established in 1S79 3 }' lls present owner, 
under whose management a prosperous and 
successful business has been secured. The 
stock embrace- a choice and varied display of 
the best make of foreign and American 
watches, silver plated ware, clocks, spectacles 
and jewelry, affording tie public a valuable 
and well selected stock to select from, in 
variety and quality of goods. This establish- 
ment will compare favorably with pretentious 
metropolitan establishments. The two lead- 
ing special features of this house are careful 
and prompt attention to the repairing of fine 
watches, clocks and jewelry in the most work- 
manlike manner, and that goods sold must 
truthfully correspond to> the representations 
made at the time of sale. Mr. Chamness is a 
lifelong resident of this slate. He is a practi- 
cal watchmaker and jeweler. 



WILLIAM POTTER. 

Groceries and Provisions, Queens- 
ware, Glassware, etc. 
The grocery and provision store of Mr. Wil- 
liam Potter is entitled to notice in a review of 
the commercial operations of this county and 
state. The business was originally established 
by him in March, iSS^ and embraces a full 
supply of choice family groceries and provi- 
sions, fine teas, conees, canned goods, notions, 
etc., also queensware, glassware, tobaccos, 
cigars, etc. His facilities enables him to com- 
pete in prices with any contemporaneous 
house in the county, when quality of goods is 
taken into the account. Mr. Potter is a native 
of Wayne County and varas born in 1S21. He 
has had a long business career and enjoys a 
fair trade from both city and country and is 
justly entitled to the liberal notice here ac- 
corded among the commercial pursuits of this 
county and state and to public consideration. 



W. L. WOOD, 

Meat Market, Main St. 
This popular meat market was established 
more than 10 years ago by Daniel Miller, who 
was succeeded" by J. C. Nicholson, from whom 
the establishment and its franchise passed into 
the possession of W. L. Wood, in August, 
1S83. He has followed this business for many 
years, and under his able management the 
well earned reputation of the house has been 
sustained. Complete facilities are enjoyed for 
the prosecution of busiixess, including a large 



HAGERSTOWN. 



^9 



refrigerator for the storage and preservation 
of meats, etc. In the preparation of meats, 
none but the fat and healthy stock are slaugh- 
tered, ensuring to patrons at all times a 
superior quality of meats, sausages, etc., at the 
lowest ruling rates. Mr. Wood is a native of 
this state, thoroughly conversant with all the 
requirements of business. 

CHARLES FORD, 

Livery, Feed and Sale Stables, 

Main St. 
Mr. Ford owns and conducts two stables in 
different sections of the town, in which he 
keeps thoroughly equipped livery rigs, single 
and double carriages and buggies, with good 
drivers, for traveling men, parties, weddings ] 
or funerals. Traveling men or others will be ' 
conveyed fo and from the depot or to distant j 
points upon reasonable term<. Horses are j 
boarded by the feed, day or week or are taken 
on sale when parties desire to dispose of such. ! 
Mr. Ford commenced the business here in j 
July, 1SS3, and now keeps from 10 to 12 good 
drivers to accommodate his patrons. The | 



business was originally established on Main 
St. by Mr. Samuel N'ewcom and William 
Mathews. They were succeeded by Mr. 
George Baldredge and Joe. Baldredge'; after- 
ward William Mathews and Clay Knode, who 
were succeeded by the present owner in Julv, 
18S3. ^ r - Ford is a native of Ohio and wis 
born in Preble County, that state, in 1S60, 
coming to this place in iS^. He is a thor- 
ough horseman and manifests that enterprise 
which is entitled to corresponding pu >lic 
recognition, both at home and from the travel- 
ing public. 



Other firms here are: Beck & Stonebraker, 
grain; Porter & Hughes, dry goods; W. Geb 
hart, hardware; W. M. Dolley, groceries; F. 
K. Jenks, jeweler; XV. Rogers, groceries; T. 
N. Williams, shoes; J. Wallick, photographer; 
Tee tor & Morrison, saw mill; Starr ..V: Pettv, 
gro^eri-s; Pierce & Porter, hardware; Reedy 
& Knode, insurance; S. Lontz, groceries; Jno. 
Stpnebreaker, dry goods; F. G. Newcomb, 
flouring mill; C. Backinstoce, tinware. 







DUBLIN 



Occupying a prominent position among 
the most enterprising business centers of 
"Wayne County, the thriving city of Dub- 
lin, although not enjoying a rapid growth 
maintains an established trade and im- 
portance worthy of liberal recognition. 
Dublin now enjoys a population of about 
1,300 inhabitants with a number of fine 
business houses and public buildings that 
would do credit to some larger towns 
and cities. It is located on the line of the 
P. C. & St. L. Railway, 17 miles west .of 
Richmond and two miles west of Cam- 
bridge City. There are a number of im- 
portant mechanical operations carried on 
here besides various mercantile concerns, 
sketches of the more important of which 
will be found in the descriptive articles 



which follow. There are here churches 
of the denomination of Friends, Christian 
Universalist, United Brethren and Meth- 
odist. There is also a public library of 
500 volumes, and one paper The Wayne 
Register, issued weekly. The excellence 
with which its finances are managed is 
indicated in the fact that the city, though 
incorporated and exercising all the func- 
tions with efficient officers, is entirely free 
from debt. In addition to the liberal 
trade it enjoys in other departments it 
transacts a large business in shipments of 
grain. The assessed value of its real es- 
tate is nearly 61,000,000 while its citizens 
as a class are noted for intelligence and 
business ability. It is one of the best 
towns of its class in this part of the state. 



JOHN FOUNTAIN, 

Lumber, Lath, Shingles, Coal, Oil, 

Window Glass, etc. 
Mr. Fountain began business in Dublin as a 
cooper and as a dealer, on a small scale, in 
lumber. There being no demand for his 
goods he was often in actual want for the 
common necessaries of life. His health be- 
came* shattered and all that was left him was 
a little home, which fortunately was free from 
encumberance. T ; me wore on and finally, as 
an experiment, he ventured on the purchase 
of a carload of lumber, which he disposed of 
only after weeks of anxiety and suspense. 
Encouraged by what seemed to be flattering 
success, he kept on hand a supply of lumber, 
and a slowly increasing demand for builders' 
material enabled him to sell at a margin. 
This took place about four years ago and all 
we need to add is that his trade now amounts 
to $io,coo annually and is increasing with 
almost incredible rapidity. He occupies two 
buildings, one two stories in height and the 
other one and a half, and are 35x25 and 16x30 
feet in dimensions respectively. He employs ' 
two regular assistants and keeps a horse and 
wagon for delivery purposes. He handles not 
less than 100 car loads of lumber annually. 
In shingles alone during the past year he dis- 
poned of 1,500,000 and about 25 car loads 
of coal. In addition to this he also deals > 
largely in gla-s, paints, oils, lime, cement, etc. [ 
In the line of doors and sash he is prepared to 
meet the requirements of builders in every 
particular. I 



JESSE PIKE, 

Undertaker and Cabinet Maker. 
Mr. Jesse Pike, the subject of our present 
sketch, is a native of North Carolina and is 
almost an octogenarian, having been born in 
1S07. He has lived in Dublin since 1S31 — 
more than half a century — and is therefore one 
of the honored pioneers of the state. In 1S27 
he carried the mail from Richmond to Indi- 
anapolis, under the supervision of Wm. Cheese- 
man. He witnessed the first wedding and 
first funeral in Dublin. We now find him 
prepared to take general charge of funerals, 
having on hand all the necessary supplies, 
two hearses, etc. He gives prompt and satis- 
factory attention to all calls in this line, and we 
find him devoting his spare time to the manu- 
facture and general repairing of furniture, 
cabinet articles, etc. He is well and favorably 
known throughout this entire section. 



IRA F. ELLIS, 

Blacksmithing, Main St. 
The subject of our present sketch is a native 
of Madison County, Ind., and was born in 
1841. He is a master workman and is pre- 
pared to do all kinds of blacksmithing, includ- 
ing horse shoeing, etc. His shop, on Main 
St., is connected with Burney's carriage estab- 
lishment, and in addition to his patronage in 
the line of custom work, shoeing, general 
repairing, etc., he does all the iron work for 
the above named carriage manufactory. He 
has followed the business for 20 years and has 
occupied his present stand since 1SS0. 



DUBLIN. 



91 



JOHN BURNEY, 

Carriage Manufacturer. 
One of the most prominent establishments 
of this description in this section is the one 
whose name heads this sketch. It was founded 
about nine years ago. Mr. Burney occupies 
a large substantial brick building two and a 
half stories in height. The first floor contains 
the wood work and iron departments; on the 
second floor are found the painting and trim- 
ming departments. Mr. Burney is a practical 
carriage maker and employs six skilled work- 
men in the different departments of his estab- 
lishment. The work in each department is 
fully guaranteed and the jobs turned out are 
noted for their uniform reliability, elegant 
finish and substantial nature. He manufac- 
tures about 15 new vehicles annually and gives 
prompt and particular attention to repairing in 
all its departments. Mr. Burneys work will 
compare favorably with any placed upon the 
market. Mr. Burney is a native of Dublin 
and was born in 1S49. He is well and favora- 
bly known throughout this section and as a 
consequence his trade is gradually increasing. 

W. J. HICKS, 

Flour and Feed. 
Mr. Hicks opened his flour and feed store 
four years ago, and although he began on a 
comparatively small scale, his trade has since 
increased to such an extent that we to-day 
find it lucrative and satisfactory. His stock 
includes a line of the best brands of family 
flour, while in the line of feed it embraces 
every article essential to the trade. Mr. Hicks 
is a native of Ohio and is 40 years of age. He 
enlisted as Corporal in the 5th Ohio Cavalry, 
Colonel Tom. Heath commanding. - He served 
in this company for three years and two 
months, when he re -enlisted in the 13th. 
Here he discharged the duties of First or 
Orderly Sergeant, under Colonel Clark. At 
the close of the rebellion he received an hon- 
orable discharge and was mustered out at City 
Point. Among the heated engagements in 
which he participated were those of Pittsburg 
Landing and Chattanooga. He has been a 
resident of this state for 10 years and is a gen- 
tleman of sterling qualities and recognized 
business ability. 

HOLLAND & BROWN, 
Druggists, Main St. 
We find this house occupying a prominent 
position among the three drug houses that 
are located in Dublin. The house dates its 
inception to 1SS0, when the above named firm 
established the business of which they still 
have control, beginning on a small scale. In 
addition to a full line of pure and fresh drugs 
and medicines, they deal in druggists' sun- 
dries, toilet articles, perfumeries, paints, oils, 
books, etc. Their trade is located throughout 
Dublin and vicinity. Jasper Holland and 
Henry Brown are the individual members 
of the firm and their personal attention is 



strictly devoted to the interests of their busi- 
ness. Mr. Holland is a practical druggist and 
eminently reliable in the filling and com- 
pounding of physicians' prescriptions. Mr. 
Holland is a native of Ohio but has resided in 
Indiana for 10 or 12 years. Mr. Brown is a 
native and has been a lifelong resident of Indi- 
ana. Our readers will find this firm enter- 
prising and reliable, with whom it is both 
pleasurable and profitable to establish business 
relations. 



T. J. LAYMON, 

Dry Goons, Hats, Caps, Qlef.nsware, 
etc., Cor. Main and Johnson Sts. 
For 30 years this old established and well 
known house has been the recognized head- 
quarters for all kinds of general merchandise, 
with the exception of hardware, his stock be- 
ing large and complete. Mr. Laymon's long 
practical experience as a dealer in general 
merchandise enables him to fully comprehend 
the wants of the public, and as a consequence 
his goods are carefully and judiciously selected 
especially for this market. In consequence of 
superior advantages possessed, he is prepared 
to sell at prices which defy competition. His 
trade has been extended throughout Dublin 
and its surroundings and is highly lucrative. 
Mr. Laymon is a native of Ohio and was born 
in 1S19. He removed to Indiana when quite 
young and is an old resident of this state. 
He has taken an active part in the growth and 
development of Wayne County and is one ot 
its most highly respected citizens. 



WHITE & MAXWELL, 
Druggists. 
1 he well known house now owned and con- 
trolled by the above named firm dates its 
inception to 1S59, when it was established by 
Dr. J. M. Bell, who carried on the business 
until his death, in 1S76, the present firm exist- 
ing since 1S77. In addition to the full line of 
pure and fresh drugs, medicines, perfumeries, 
cosmetics, proprietory medicines, etc., carried 
by the firm, they keep constantly on hand a 
well selected stock of paints, oils, varnishes, 
brushes, toilet articles, wall paper, school and 
miscellaneous books, etc. The individual 
members of the firm are Oliver White and 
Benjamin F. Maxwell. Both members of the 
firm are natives of Indiana and were born in 
1S36. Mr. White is a practical druggist and a 
graduate of Amherst College and for a period 
of eight years occupied the position of teacher 
in some "of the leading colleges and academies 
of the state. 



JOHN W. SCOTT, 

Post Master and Insurance Agent. 

It would be superfluous in us to eulogize 
the Aetna Fire Insurance Company, of Hart- 
ford, Conn., the Home Insurance Company, 
of New York, or the Provident Life and Trust 
Company, of Philadelphia. They are so 
prominently national in the range and extent 



92 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



of their connections that nothing we could 
say would add one iota to their well established 
reputations. These companies are represented 
in Dublin by its esteemed and enterprising 
townsman, John W. Scott. Mr. Scott is a 
native of Union County, Ind., and was born 
in 1817. He served as first Auditor of said 
county for a period of 10 years — from 1S41 to 
1851. In 1S64 he moved from Union County 
to Wayne, where he has since resided. He 
has served as Post Master of Dublin since 
July, 1SS1, and has conducted the office in a 
manner highly commendable. As a repre- 
sentative of the aforesaid insurance companies, 
he is recognized as a reliable and trustworthy 
gentleman. 

J. V. R. ROCKAFELLOW, 
Diamond Spring Beds. 
The Diamond Spring Bed, in point of dura- 
bility, elegance and comfort, as well as cheap- 
ness, can be unhesitatingly recommended to 
the public as the best spring bed in the mar- 
ket The bed consists of 63 of Gray's Patent 
Springs, made of the best Bessimer steel, 



firmly fastened on a neat wooden frame and 
connected with spiral spring coils in such a 
way as to give uniform strength to the springs 
and a level surface to the bed. The outside 
springs are fastened by a spiral coil, fastened 
to a frame so as to prevent them giving too 
much. The bed is adjustable and any size is 
made on order. This bed was patented in 
January, 1SS3, by Mr. J. V. Gray. Under the 
firm name of Gray & Rea the* business was 
carried on for a short time, when Mr. Hatfield 
purchased the right of manufacture and sale. 
On the 4th of September, 1SS3, Mr. Hatfield 
transfered his interest to the present owner, 
Mr. J. V. R. Rockafellow, who is an old resi- 
dent of this state. 



Among the other more important firms do- 
ing business here are the following: S. Dillon 
& Son, general merchandise; S. F. Crull, gro- 
ceries; E. N. King, flour mills; C. T Swain, 
groceries; C. T. Barrett, harness; J. C Rowe, 
groceries; Smith & Frazee, meat market; J. 
G. Swain, hardware; Hagaman & McTaggart^. 
groceries. 



1 . bs&pfc 



Lfta& 



% 



^f'fc^l^ft'*^ 




MILTON. 



There are few towns in this section of 
the state which exhibit in their commer- 
cial operations a more uniform enterprise 
and business sagacity, and none more 
pleasantly situated in the midst of a thri- 
ving and substantial class of agricultur- 
ists. Milton is an incorporated town of 
about 800 inhabitants, situated on the 
banks of a branch of the White Water 
River, and on the iine of the Ft. Wavne, 
C. & L, and White Water Valley Ry's, 
in Washington Township. It is 16 miles 



s. w. of Richmond and two miles south of 
Cambridge City and was incrporated in 
1870. It has a fine graded school, an M. 
E. church, Friends' meeting house, and a 
Christian church. Its business advanta- 
ges embrace quite a number of fine busi- 
ness houses nearly all of which are herein 
noticed. Both grain and live stock are 
largely shipped and the trade of the town 
will compare favorably with any place of 
its size in the state. 



DORSEY MACHINE COMPANY, 
Harvesting Machinery. 
This company was incorporated in 1879 
under the laws of the state of Indiana with a 
capital stock, of $60,000, which has since been 
increased to $125,000. The grounds occupied 
for manufacturing and storage purposes cover 
an area of about four acres, upon which are 
erected four principal buildings, with numer- 
ous smaller structures, sheds, etc. These are 
the only works in the state deroted exclu- 
sively to this special branch of industry and 
among the largest in the Union engaged in 
the manufacture of harvesting machines atone. 
An average force of 150 workmen is em- 
ployed and the bi-weekly pay roll averages 
about $4,300. The company enjoys the 
amplest facilities for receiving matirial and 
shipping their manufactured products by rail, 
and the demand for their machines extends to 
all sections of the United States and Canada. 
As showing the almost phenomenal growth 
of this industrial enterprise, which can only be 
accounted for by the fact that their machines 
possess undoubted merit and more than ordi- 
nary points of excellence, it may be stated 
that while their sales in 1S79 reached only 
about $100,000, their transactions for the year 
18S3 considerably exceed $250,000. Among 
the specialties manufactured here may be par- 
ticularly mentioned the Combined Self Raking 
Reaper's and Mowers, Single Light Mowers, 
Combined Droppers and Mowers, the Dorsey 
Twine Binding Harvester, etc. The company 
issues a finely illustrated descriptive catalogue, 
which will be found to contain much practical 
information of great value to farmers in all 
parts of the Union, which they will send to 
interested parties upon application or supply 
through their duly authorized agents in all 
the principal cities of the country. The offi- 
cers of the Dorsey Machine Company as at 



present organized are Aaron Morris, Presi- 
dent; Linvi.ie Ferguson, Vice President; Will. 
T. Gaines Secretary; D. P. Leibhardt, Treas- 
urer, and Oliver Ferguson, Superintendent. 



J. L. MANLOVE, 

Iron* and Wood Fence and Auto- 
matic Gate Manufacturer, One- 
Half Mile North of Miltun. 
The iron and wood fence manufactured by 
the enterprising gentleman whose name ap- 
pears at the head ot our present sketch, has 
been in use three years and has given univer- 
sal satisfaction. The fence has many com- 
mendable features, among which may be 
mentioned its cheapness, durability and neat 
and attractive appearance. It is made sub- 
stantially as follows: Red cedar posts r.re 
planted in the ground in the usual way. To 
these posts are fastened strips ot wood about 
two feet apart by means of castings cal'.ed 
clamps. These strips then receive small iron 
rods, so interlaced as to make a most attractive 
appearance, thus making the fence especially 
adapted to private grounds, yards and lawr.s. 
The automatic gate manufactured by Mr. 
Manlove is an improvement on all others of 
the kind and has been introduced into all the 
states of the Union and the Canadas. The 
vehicle, on entering the gateway, drives across 
an iron bar, which throws open the gate, and 
after having driven through another bar 
causes the gate to fly shut. This gate never 
fails to respond and is in reality the only gate 
in the market of any reliability, for the open- 
ing and closing of which the driver need never 
climb from his vehicle. Mr. Manlove is a 
native of Favette County, Ind., and was born 
in 1S46. His fence and gate give entire satis- 
faction wherever used and we can safely 
accord to him a leading position in this work 
among the successful and enterprising as well 
as reliable manufacturers ol' this section. 



94 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



MILTON HYDRAULIC MILLS, 
George Leggate, Proprietor. 
These model mills were erected in 1SS2 and 
furnished throughout with the most approved 
styles and devices of modern machinery and 
appliances. The main building, containing 
three stories and basement, is 36x50 feet in 
dimensions, equipped with four run of stone 
and all the requisite appliances (or manufac- 
turing a superior grade of fine family flour, by 
what is technically known as the "new pro- 
cess" system. The capacity of the mills when 
running full lime is 100 barrels every 24 hours, 
the demand tor which is not only local but 
extends to remote sections of the Union. A 
large amount ot custom work is also done, the 
facilities enjoyed being fully equal to those of 
any custom "mills in the state. Propelling 
power for the machinery in use is supplied by 
Leffel's turbine water wheels. The appoint- 
ments and fixtures in every department are 
first class, even to the most minute details, 
and all the latest modern improvements have 
been introduced by the proprietor, Mr. George 
Leggate, who came to Milton from Ohio in 
1879. He is a thoroughly practical miller and 
devotes his personal attention to the manage- 
ment of the extensive business which he has 
created by his energy and business ability. 



PETER WARREN, 

Carriage Manufacturer. 

Intimately identified with the business in- 
terests of this section of Wayne County and 
adjacent territory, the carriage shops of Mr. 
Peter Warren are justly entitled to prominent 
mention in a work devoted to the progressive 
and industrial interests of this county and 
state. The business now conducted by Mr. 
Warren was established over 35 years ago and 
is among the oldest business establishments of 
its kind in the county. The work is all done 
by hand, and not only the best seasoned tim- 
ber used but the best mechanical skill is exhi- 
bited in every branch of the business. In 
addition to doing every description of wood 
work and iron repairing, painting, trimming, 
etc., about 10 new jobs are turned out annually. 
Mr. Peter Warren is a native of Delaware, in 
-which state he was born in 1823. He came to 
this section of the state when quite young and 
for a period of 55 years has resided here. 



J. BROWN & SON, 

Groceries and Hardware. 
For half a century this house has been 
known to the public and been under the pres- 
ent control for about 14 years, succeeding the 
business of Aaron Shrader. The stock em- 
braces a full line of groceries, staple and fancy, 
provisions, etc , together with a well selected 
stock of hardware, comprising a carefully 
selected assortment to meet the special wants 
of trade for this section. The sales of tins 
house will exceed $12,000 annually. Mr. J. 
Brown was born in Clinton County, Pa.; his 
son, now in general charge of the business, 



was born in Milton, December i6t, 1838. He 
is one of the few persons doing business in the 
town here where he was born. This house 
ranks among the most prominent and safe 
business establishments of Milton. 



G. W. CALLAWAY & CO., 
Central Drug Store. 
This house was original lv established by L. 
S. Tibbals & Co. in 1S6S and was afterward 
conducted by Messrs. Pennington A: Sweney, 
who were succeeded by G. W. Callaway, he 
subsequently by M. M. Callaway, who con- 
ducted the business up to 1SS0, at which time 
the firm name became G. W. Callaway & Co. 
The premises at present occupied embrace a 
room 13x70 feet in dimensions. One part is 
devoted to the Post Office, while the general 
stock embraces a full line of pure drugs and 
medicines, all popular and desirable proprie- 
tary medicines, perfumeries and toilet articles, 
school books and school children's complete 
outfits, notions, etc. Special attention is given 
to the preparation of physicians' prescriptions 
and family recipes, in which the purest ingre- 
dients are used. Tiie business of this house is 
conducted by Mr. G. W. Callaway, assisted by 
his son. Mr. Callaway is a native of Wavne 
County and was born in 1S34. After receiv- 
ing his education he engaged in commercial 
pursuits and has for many years been identi- 
fied with the active interests of this commu- 
nity. He received the appointment of Post 
Master about three years ago and also holds 
the office of Notary Public, giving special 
attention to the drawing and acknowledging 
of legal papers of every description. 

BRAGG & GUYTON, 

Central Avenue Meat Market. 
The enterprise here referred to was origi- 
nally established by Mr. William Bragg about 
10 years ago and conducted by him up to 
March, 1SS3, at which time Mr. John D. Guy- 
ton was admitted to partnership and the pres- 
ent firm name adopted. This firm enjoys the 
best facilities for conducting a thoroughly suc- 
cessful and satisfactory business. They care- 
fully select and slaughter their own stock and 
will neither kill nor handle any but first class 
and healthy stock. As an indication of the 
present extent of their business it may be 
stated that they slaughter annually about 250 
beeves, 500 hogs, 50 calves and 25 sheep, enjoy- 
ing a gradually increasing patronage from 
both town and country. Mr. Bragg, the senior 
member of this firm, is an old resident of this 
firm, is an old resident of this state and was 
born in Madison County in 1S40. Mr. Guyton 
was born in Fredrick County, Md., in 1S46, 
coming to this state in 1S64. 'Practically con- 
versant with all the details of the business and 
provided with all essential facilities for hand- 
ling and procuring fresh meats, with bologna, 
sausage, etc., in their appropriate season, this 
firm occupies a leading position in this line in 
this section of the county. 



MILTON. 



95 



J. M. GRIGSBY, 
Druggist. 
This drug house was originally established 
"by Mr. David G. Kerr over 30 jears ago and 
successfully conducted by him up to 1875, at 
which time it passed into the hands of Mr. J. 
M. Grigsby, the present proprietor. In stock 
is carried pure drugs, chemicals, standard and 
proprietary medicines, including a full line of 
druggists' sundries and books and school sup- 
plies. Mr. Grigsby also conducts a circulating 
library, containing over 500 volumes. This 
■enterprise on the part of Mr. G. has been 
4ughly appreciated by the going class of peo- 
ple. It was established six years ago. This 
is the oldest drug establishment of the town 



and is doing a prosperous . business. Mr. 
Grigsby is the oldest Notary Public in the 
town. He was born in Pennsylrania in 1849, 
but came to this state when a boy. He enjoy- 
a thorough practical knowledge of the drug 
business and has secured the confidence of the 
public in the preparation and compounding of 
medicines. 



Among others doing business here are the 
following: M. H. Moore Sc Co, drv goods; 
F. M.Jones & Co., hardware; W. P". Moore, 
groceries; C. C. Hollow ell, tinware; W. H. 
Swope, harness; J. Noll, shoes; St. Clair & 
Bilby, drugs; Jones & Gresh, dry goods; P. 
Hoshour, stoves; M. Michael, jeweler. 



EAST GERMANTOWN. 



"Was laid out in 1833-4, and was first 
-called Georgetown but afterward changed 
to present name. Among the early set- 
tlers were John Buekly, Jacob Waltz and 
Jacob Sowers. Benj. Conklin started the 
iirst store which was in charge of John 
Buckley. John Hazleton built the first 
house. Jacob Sowers was the first post- 
master, 1843. The first church was the 



Lutheran, 1835. There is now a popula- 
tion of about 400 inhabitants, with many- 
business houses which in stock and gen- 
eral facilities will bear favorable compari- 
son with the larger towns and cities of this 
section of the state. There is a good pub- 
lic school building, a German and an 
English Lutheran and an Evangelical 
church. 



J. H. WINTER, 

General Merchandise. 
The leading mercantile house of East Ger- 
mantown and one of the oldest and most thor- 
oughly reliable in this section of the county, is 
that now conducted by Mr. J. H. Winter which 
was original Iv established by C. Morgan who 
was succeed ed by Russell & Skinner, after 
which it was moved to its present location and 
conducted by Wysong & Winter who formed 
a partnership in 1S76, the present proprietor 
assuming control in 1879, under whose effi- 
cient management the business has since been 
conducted. The premises occupied for busi- 
ness purposes are 50x50 feet in dimensions and 
the stock comprises a general and complete 
assortment of foreign and American dry goods 
staple and fancy groceries, clothing* boots, 
shoes, hats, caps, hardware, notions, tobacco, 
cigars and miscellaneous merchandise in a 



great variety of forms such as usually are 
found in firs't class, well conducted establish- 
ments of this kind. The postoffice occupies a 
portion of the room devoted to mercantile pur- 
j po>es and this house is the recognized head 
J quarters for trade among the residents of this 
J and surrounding towns. Mr. Winter was born 
J in Lanca>ter County, Pa., in 1S51. He has re- 
sided in Germantown for the past 20 years. 
I His mercantile career has been characterized 
I by liberality, enterprise and honorable meth- 
j ods of dealing and his reputation for integrity 
and reliability is unquestioned in this section 
where he is widely and favorably known. 



Other more important firms doing business 
here ate: J. S. Short', drugs; E. D. Nert", cigar 
mfctr; H. M. Sourbeer, hotel; Elmer Wart'el, 
cigar manufacturer. 



jienry County. 



While disclaiming any pretension to 
assume the responsibilities or prorogations 
of the historian whose office and claim is 
the production of an exhaustive literary 
review of the origin and incidents per- 
taining to a strictly historical work upon 
the county, we presume to restrict our 
efforts, rather, to more specific matters as 
they bear more directly upon the rise and 
progress of industrial "interests. As hav- 
ing a direct bearing upon subsequent 
developments, we compile many useful 
and interesting features of early history 
for the purpose of showing the infancy 
of trade, commercial and manufacturing 
operations, for comparison or contrast 
with these features as they exist at the 
present time. By treaty negotiated at St. 
Marys, in 1818, by acting Gov. Jennings, 
Ge n . Lewis Cass and Judge Benj. Parks, 
the territory now embraced in this and 
other counties, was relinquished by the 
Indians, and confirmed in 1821 . The first 
settlers of which any notice is found came 
to this section in 1819, and no surveys 
were made until the following year. In 
1821 the first entries of land are recorded. 
Among the earlier settlers we mention 
Joseph Morris, Samuel Julian, T. R. Stan- 
ford, (first judge), Willett M. Carv, James 
Harvey, Wm. Woodard, Ashel Wood- 
ard, (April, 1810), Asa Heaton, Joel 
Gilbert, Dempsey Reese, Seth Henshaw, 
C. Wickersham, and E. Martindale. 
Henry County was organized in February, 
1822, and was named in honor of Patrick 
Henry, of Virginia, as is the case with 
all early organized counties of the state, 
many changes were subsequently made, 
resulting ultimately in the formation of 
the following townships: Henry, Spice- 
land, Prairie, Franklin, Wayne, Dudley, 
Liberty, Greensboro', Harrison, Stony 
Creek, Fall Creek, Jefferson and Blue 
River. The principal towns are, New 
Castle, Middletown, Knightstown, Lewis- 



ville, Greensboro', Spiceland, Lisbon, Cor- 
win, Mt. Summit, Springport, Woodville, 
Ashton and Millville. Among the earlier 
settlers of Henry Township were Ashel 
Woodard: Andrew Shannon, Allen Shep- 
herd, Geo. Hobson and Wm. Shannon. 
The first cabin was erected by Mr. Wood- 
ard, just north of New Castle, and Wm. 
Owen, of Dudley Township, purchased 
the first tract of land February 4, 1822. 
The first church built in Henry County 
was by the Friends Society, in 1823, in 
Hopewell Township. The first school 
house was built in Dudley Township, 1823, 
and the first tavern was kept by Charles 
Jamison. The first steam mill was erected 
and^ conducted by Daniel Reynolds in 
1837. The first carding machine was 
erected neajr the location of the present 
depot at Knightstown. The countv is 
chiefly undulating and of rich alluvial 
soil, and is finely provided with streams 
capable of supplying water power, the 
chief of which are, Blue River, Deer 
Creek, Flat Rock and Stony Creeks, and 
it is said that no white man was ever 
murdered by Indians within the limits of 
this county. 

Henry County is located in Eastern 
Indiana, in the midst of a fine, rolling 
country, well watered and productive! 
Turnpikes traverse it in all directions. It 
is famous for the intelligence, education 
and refinement of its citizens; for its 
splendid farms, highly cultivated and 
handsomely improved, and for the large 
production and good quality of grain, 
horses, cattle, sheep and hogs. From a 
late statistical report we see that the 
county is out of debt. Population, 25,- 
000. Value of lands, 80,084,(180; im- 
provements, 82,788,425; personal prop- 
erty, 85,025,330. Its public buildings, 
court house, jail, asylum and orphans' 
home rank with the best in the State. 



LEWISVILLE 



The town of Lewisville, Franklin Town- 
ship, is situated in the southern part of 
Heury County on the line of the Old Na- 
tional Pike and the C, St. L.& P. Ry. The 
town was originally laid out by Mr. Lewis 
Freeman in 1829. In October of that 
year the lots were offered for sale, and 
the comfort of attendants secured by an 
immense log fire. Among the primative 
incidents we mention that the first store 
was one of general merchandize, owned 
by Mr. James B. Harris. The post office 
for this section was originally at what 
was known as Garnett, near here, and 
was kept by Garnett Hayden. He after- 
wards kept the first hotel opened in this 
town. The first postmaster in Lewisville 



was John Widdows. The first black- 
smith shop was started either by Samuel 
Sackett or John Baldwin. Among the 
early settlers we mention Robert Fletcher, 
Robert Smith, Sr., and William Houston. 
The fiirst physician was Dr. Harper. The 
first church building erected was the M. 
E. Church, in 1842-3. The town now 
contains about 500 inhabitants, abuut 
twenty business houses of every descrip- 
tion; two churches, M. E. Church and 
Presbyterian; one well conducted acade- 
my; four physicians; flouring mill, and 
one hotel.' It enjoys a good local trade 
from the fine agricultural district with 
which it is surrounded. 



WHITE ROSE MILLS, 

W. H. Lewis, Proprietor. 
These mills are the largest in this section in 
the magnitude of their operations. The White 
Rose mills were erected in 1S56 by Ely Davis, 
who controlled the business for a number of 
years, when he was succeeded by E. J. Love- 
land. In 1876 Mr. Loveland gave way to the 
present proprietor, who had been the practical 
manager and bookkeeper of the house for 
6ome years prior to that time. The mill was 
remodeled in 1SS2 at an expense of $4,200 
and is now among the best equipped in the 
6tate for the manufacture of the choicest 
brands of family flour. The building is large 
and substantial, 50x60 feet in dimensions and 
four stories in height. It is equipped with 
four run of stone, the new process has been 
introduced and all the machinery throughout 
the mill is of the latest and most improved 
designs. A 60 horse power engine supplies 
the motive power and a working force of four 
hands are kept in constant employ. The flour 
turned out is of the finest quality and will 
bear comparison with any contemporaneous 
establishment in the state. The producls are 
sold in this locality, besides shipments to Balti- 
more, New York and other points. Their 
capacity is about 100 barrels per 24 hours. 
To the building above described is attached a 
large warehouse 20x120 feet in dimensions, 
used for the storage of grain, etc., in which 
line Mr. Lewis transacts an immense busi 
ness. In 1SS2 he handled about 100,000 
1 bushels of grain. His storage capacity is 



50,000. Mr. Lewis is a careful and reliable 
business manager and a practical miller of 14 
years experience. He was born in Indiana in 
1840 and has for a number of years been 
identified with the commercial and business 
operations of this section of the state. In 1S61 
he enlisted in Company A, 36th Indiana Vol- 
unteer Infantry, serving in the Army of the 
Tennessee, principally under McCook and 
Howard, Corps Commanders, and Nelson and 
Palmer, Division Commanders, receiving an 
honorable discharge in 1S64. 



WILLIAM L. HOUSTON, 
Postmaster. 
For so many years identified with the com- 
munity in which he resides, more than a 
passing notice is due Mr. Houston in this 
work. He is a native of Rockbridge Countv, 
Va., where he was born in 1S13, removing 
with his uncle, Mr. J. Poague, and his mother 
to this state. In 1S25 they removed to Jennings 
County and the following June removing to 
Union County, near Liberty. Here Mr. 
Houston served an apprenticeship under Isaac 
Conwell, a well known tanner of that place. 
In 1S34 ' le married and removed to this 
county, where he has since resided. In 1837 
he was appointed Po>master under Van 
Buren's Administration and held the office for 
iS consecutive years under the successive 
changes ot administration. In 1S77 he was 
again appointed to this office, which he still 
holds, to the highest satisfaction of all con- 
cerned. In politics, he has always been identi- 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



fied with the Republican party since its birth, 
. in 1856. He adheres firmly to its principles, 
having been educated in the old Whig school 
of politics. He cast his first vote for William 
H. Harrison, the hero of Tippecanoe. Mr. 
Houston is the father of eight children, six of 
•whom are still living. Highlj esteemed in 
the community in which he lives and active 
in the promotion of progressive interests, we 
freely accord to him the notice here given. 

BENJAMIN HOOL, 

Manufacturer or Carriages, Wagons, 
ktc, William St. 

• Mr Hool's establishment is the only one of 
the kind in Lewisville and exercises considera- 
ble influence upon the commercial interests of 
this locality, such as entitles it to liberal sup- 
port and consideration in this review. Mr. 
Hool is a native of Canada and was born in 
1820. He has been a resident of the United 
States since 183S, coming to this section of 
this state in 1854. The enterprise in which he 
is now engaged was opened by him in 1S77. 
He was identified with the hotel and mer- 
chandising business for a number of years 
prior to that time. His establishment is noted 
for reliable work in every department of the 
business, a point which he guarantees to his 
patrons. He turns out about 12 new jobs 
annually and pays special attention to repair- 
ing and job work, painting and trimming, etc. 
Mr. Hool is a skilled and practical workman 
and employs only the best of artizans, uses 
none but the best material and is justly entitled 
to the liberal notice here accorded in a review 
of the business and manufacturing enterprises 
of this part of the state. 



MRS. ROBERT BARTLETT, 

Dry Goods, Clothing, Notions, Boots, 
Shoes, Hats and Caps, etc. • 
This house, which is the leading one of the 
town, was established in 1S75 by Robert Bart- 
lett, but upon the death of Mr. Bartlett, in 
1876, his wife assumed control of the house 
and has managed it in a manner that is highly 
satisfactory to the public and beneficial to both 
the proprietor and her patrons. This business 
occupies a salesroom 22x60 feet in dimensions 
and carries a stock of goods worth at least 
$10,000. Her annual trade will amount to 
$25,000 and extends throughout Lewisville 
and its environments. The business is to a 
great extent under the management of W. M. 
Bartlett, a son of the proprietress, who has 
enjoyed that experience in the trade which 
ensures to him a successful business career and 
a comprehension of the requirements of the 
various branches of trade this house controls. 
Mrs. Bartlett is a native and lifelong resident 
of this state and the advantages enjoyed by 
this house in securing supplies from producers 
and the best jobbing houses of the country 
insure to It the ability to compete in prices 
with any contemporaneous establishment in 
the state. 



BROWN & BOLLMEYER, 

Drugs, Books, Stationery, etc. 
This business was first established in iS62r 
by Dr. Castor, and after passing successively 
through the hands of C. A. Humphrey, Wil- 
son & Reddick, Asa Davis, Rail & Copland 
and Dr. Van Nuys, the present firm took pos- 
session in December, 1S82. The trade of the 
house has grown gradually since the date of 
its inception. Their stock is complete in all 
the departments, including also a full line of 
wall paper, notions, druggists' sundries, etc. 
Their storeroom is 17x60 feet in dimensions 
and presents a neat and attractive appearance. 
The entire room is filled to repletion with 
their stock, the aggregate valuation of which 
amounts to $2,800. Their annual trade com- 
pares very favorably with that of any similar 
establishment in this section and amounts to 
$7,000. They make it a point to keep in 
stock none but pure and fresh drugs and 
medicines and exercise special care in the 
compounding of prescriptions. D. M. Brown 
was born in Indiana in 1841 ; Mr. Bollmever 
in Ohio in 1857. Both are conservative "but 
enterprising gentlemen, the firm enjoying, as 
a consequence of those and other qualifica- 
tions, the esteem of the entire community. 
Mr. J. F. Bollmeyer is at present filling the 
position of Treasurer of the corporation. 



CALDWELL HOUSE, 

Benjamin Caldwell, Proprietor. 
The site occupied by the Caldwell House 
has been used for hotel purposes for 50 years. 
The hotel that formerly stood here" was 
destroyed by fire in 1S65. In 1S69 the present 
building was constructed by Jesse Sanders. 
The present proprietor has had charge of the 
house since 1S79, having in that year suc- 
ceeded his uncle, James Caldwell, after whom 
the house had been named. The building is. 
50x50 feet in dimensions, two storie* in height 
and contains 15 rooms. Fifty guests can be 
accommodated and the rates for transient 
visitors are $1.50 per day. The office, dining 
room and kitchen, on the first floor, are noted 
for their cleanliness and good order, and the 
sleeping apartments throughout the building 
are comfortably furnished. The tables are 
always supplied with the best substantiate 
as well as delicacies to be had in the market 
here and the cooking will always satisfy even 
the most fastidious, while all the comforts of a 
home are extended to its patrons. Mr. Cald- 
well is a native of Fayette County, this state, 
and was born in 1S37. tIe > s a genial host 
and is well known by traveling men. 



WILSON & HOPPER, 

Blacksmithing and Wagon Making, 

East Main St. 
The shop conducted by this firm, on East 
Main St., is 30x40 feet in dimensions, and in 
addition to the services of both members of ' 
the firm one skilled assistant is kept in con- 
stant employ. They turn out about 12 new 



LEWISVILLE. 



99 



jobs annually and their work will bear favora- 
ble comparison with that turned out by 
metropolitan establishments, not only in artis- 
tic finish but also in a marked sense in its 
durability and solidity. Their principal work, 
however, is general repairing, horse shoeing 
and job work, to which they give prompt and 
satisfactory attention. The wood work de- 
partment is in chnrge of Mr. David Firecoat, 
who is a thoroughly practical and accom- 
plished workman. Mr. Wilson is a native of 
Virginia and was born in 1843. Mr. Hopper 
is a native and lifelong resident of Lewisville 
and was born in 185S. Their business is 
steadily increasing and their establishment is 
recognized as one of the permanent and sub- 
stantial institutions of Lewisville. 



WILLIAM REYNOLDS, 

Livery and Feed Stable. 
These stables were built in 1S81 by their 
present proprietor. The building is 42x36 
feet in dimensions and one and one- half 
stories in height. The stables are conveni- 
ently arranged, well equipped, and 15 horses 
can be conveniently accommodated. He 
keeps four first class roadsters, with suitable 
turnouts tor livery purposes, and enjoys alto- 
gether a liberal patronage. He has been 
identified with livery business since 1875 and 
is conversant with all its details. Mr. Rey- 
nolds is a native of this state and is about 40 
years of age. He is held in high esteem by 
his fellow citizens and has at different times 
held offices of trust under the corporation. 
He is at present acting in the capacity of Con- 
stable, discharging every duty to the satisfac- 
tion of all concerned. 

J. C. KELLER, 

Drugs, Books, Stationery, etc. 
The business carried on by the above named 
gentleman constitutes one of the most im- 
portant industries of Lewisville and is entitled 
to fayorable notice in this work. The house 
was established 12 years ago by Dr. Kerr. It 
has been under the present management for 
four years, Mr. Keller having at that time suc- 
ceeded S. T. S. Williams. Mr. Keller occu- 



pies a salesroom 24x52 feet in area, to 'which 
is attached a side room 10x30 feet in area. 
The stock carried embraces every article that 
could be enumerated in connection with this 
line of business. Mr. Keller has made the 
drug business his life work and takes special 
pains to keep his stock constantly replenished 
with new and fresh supplies. In addition to 
his supply of drugs and proprietary- medicines 
he carries a full line of druggist's* sundries, 
mixed paints, oils, school books and supplies, 
stationery, cigars, tobaccos, notion*, lamps, 
toilet articles, etc. Mr. Keller is a native of 
Pennsylvania but has resided in this stzte 
about 30 years. He has been actively en- 
gaged in the drug business since 1S67. 



SANDERS & CHESNUT, 
Meat Market. 
Mr. Jesse Sanders, the senior member of 
this firm, is a native of North Carolina and 
was born in tSto. He settled nere in 1S24, 
when this section was a comparative wilder- 
ness; is now 73 years of age and is hale and 
hearty, being able to read the papers without 
the aid of glasses. His aged and venerable 
mother, 96 years of age, is still living in this 
county, enjoying good health. Mr. Sanders 
has pursued the business in which he is now 
engaged to a greater or less extent for a 
period of 25 years. In the meanwhile he has 
been identified with other business pursuit-;, 
he having built the Caldwell House. His 
partner and grandson by marriage is an ern- 
cient and enterprising business man, and on 
him devolves much of the business of the 
firm. The firm handle about 150 fat cattle 
annually and dispose of small stock in pro- 
portion. During the winter months they ship 
large lots of poultry to the Eastern "cities. 
Their trade altogether is large and satisfac- 
tory, the firm enjoying, as it does, the con- 
fidence and esteem of the entire commun':v. 



There are also doing business here the fol- 
lowing firms: 

G. Hume, hardware; Smith & Son, planing 
mill; T. L. Guering, general store; Coltrain 
& Philips, livery; D. Fenstamaker, harness. 



NEW CASTLE. 



Soon after the organization of the coun- 
ty this place was chosen as the county 
seat, and while the assumed proprietor is 
recognized as Mr. Charles Jamison as the 
first settler of the town, the records show 
he had less to do with it than some others. 
Mr. Absalom Harvey gave twenty acres 
and John Brumfield about twenty -eight 
acres, A. Lewis gave fourteen acres, Allen 
Shepherd ten acres, Messrs. Rue & Hole- 
man, of Wayne County, gave twenty-four 
acres, less five lots. The first sale of lots 
occurred in July, 1822. Dwellings now 
began to be erected and the settlement to 
prosper. The first merchant was Isaac 
Budsaul, who erected a log cabin 12x16 
feet in size. It had only a dirt floor with 
roof, counters and shelves constructed of 
stakes, pins and clapboards. The stock, 
though small, consisted of every variety 
of mercantile commodity appropriate to 
those early days, and the sales were chiefly 
In barter, a large portion being in skins 
and furs. The first M. E. Church was 
organized in 1823 with Father Havens as 
preacher. The first Circuit Court, met at 
the house of Mr. Hobson, September 30, 
1822, at which were present Associate 
Judges Thos. R. Stanford and Elisha 
Long. The first entry on the court docket 
is, "Andrew Shannon, so far forgot him- 
self as to swear two profane oaths in the 
presence of the conrt, for which he is 
fined 82." The total amount of taxes for 
1822 were §74.50. The total vote of the 
county in 1825 was 366. The contract 
for building the first court house was 
given May 14, 1822, to Geo. Barnard, to 
be constructed of logs 20x26 feet in size, 
at a cost of S247.00. The second court 
house was built of brick in 1832, but not 
accepted until 1836, at a cost of $4,500. 
This house was destroyed by fire in 1864 
and the present large and beautiful struc- 
ture was completed at a cost of 8120,000, 
and accepted in 1869. The present jail 
is also a model of solid masonry and iron 



and was built at a cost of $40,000. The 
first newspaper published in New Castle 
was March 31, 1836, and was called the 
Henry County Sun, though it was not for 
some time published with any regularity. 
The first postmaster was James Budsaul, 
he was also the first auditor of the 
county. New Castle is situated within a 
mile of the center of the county, and is 
chiefly upon elevated ground. About 
ninety-four acres were originally donated 
to the town, and many additions have 
since been made. In 1833 it contained 
but 300 inhabitants, while it contains to- 
day not less than 3,000. While its growth 
was comparitively slow up to 1854, the 
completion of the Chicago and Eastern 
Railroad (now I. & St. L.) at this time 
greatly facilitated its growth and business 
importance, and the subsequent comple- 
tion of the Muncie, New Castle and Fort 
Wayne R. R., and more recently the I, 
B. & W., giving it superior shipping fa- 
cilities and stimulating manufacturing 
enterprise. Its manufacturing enterprises 
and fine business houses, as well as its 
fine public buildings and palatial private 
residences entitles it to rank among the 
most beautiful inland cities in the state. 
New Castle has seven churches; the best 
of public schools, taught nine months in 
the year. Two established weekly papers 
are published, viz.: The Hunry County 
Courier, published by W. H. Elliott, en- 
joying a circulation of 3,000. The Mur- 
cury, by Parker & Wickersham, six col. 
quarto, also enjoys a liberal circulation. 
Nine turnpikes lead from the county seat 
to the utmost corners of the county. Few 
cities of its size in any section will strike 
the stranger more favorably as a desirable 
place of business or residence than that 
of New Castle. Following will be found 
sketches of nearly all the principal busi- 
ness houses, which will serve to r give the 
reader an idea of the city's importance as 
a commercial point. 



CITY OF NEW CASTLE. 



101 



NEW CASTLE FOUNDRY AND 

PUMP COMPANY, 
General Foundry and Machine 
Works. 

Unquestionably one of the most Important 
of New Castle's industrial enterprises is that 
which under the de>ignating title of the New 
Castle Foundry and Pump Company has re- 
cently been organized in this city for the man- 
ufacture of Cooper's Patent Anti-Freezing 
Pumps and for the transaction of a general 
business in foundry and machine work and 
jobbing and repairing in all branches. The 
works of this company are the only ones of 
the class in the city and their establishment 
here has been of immense benefit and advan- 
tage to the industrial and commercial devel- 
opment of New Castle. This company was 
organized and incorporated under the laws of 
the State of Indiana in May, 1S83, with an 
authorized capital stock of $10,000, and the 
following officers were elected: George W. 
Burke, President; J. S. Hedges, Treasurer, 
and W. W. Cotteral, Secretary. The build- 
ings occupied by the company for manufac- 
turing purposes consist of a two story main 
building 30x40 feet in dimensions, a foundry 
20x24 an ^ an en gine house 20x24 feet in size. 
Fourteen hands, most of whom are skilled 
workmen, are regularly employed and the 
latest designs of labor saving machinery and 
appliances are utilized in the various depart- 
ments, motive power for which is supplied by 
one 35 horse power engine and boiler. With 
facilities unsurpassed by any contemporaneous 
establishment in the state, "this company man- 
ufacture to order any variety or style of cast- 
ings or machinery and make a specialty of 
general repairing. The leading feature of 
these important works, however, at the pres- 
ent time, and one which promises to reach 
immense proportions in the not far distant 
future, is the manufacture of Cooper's Anti- 
Freezing Pumps, an invention of Mr. D. M. 
Cooper, secured by letters patent from the 
United States Government, dated August 
20th, 1S7S, and amended April 24th, 1SS3, and 
controlled exclusively by this company. This 
is one of the most important improvements 
and inventions yet introduced in connection 
with pumps and consists of the application of 
a device to prevent the freezing of water in 
the pump even in the coldest weather and 
under the most unfavorable conditions of cli- 
matic changes. The pump is so constructed 
as to secure a uniform temperature from top 
to bottom of tubing, by permitting the warm 
air from the lower depths of the well to ascend 
in a hollow cast iron trunk, this continual cur- 
rent of warm air serving to prevent the freez- 
ing of the»water in the tubing. This is the 
only device now in use for utilizing the warm 
temperature of deep wells to prevent freezing, 
and wherever it has been adopted the plan 
has received the most cordial testimonials and 
commendations of scientists and practical 
mechanics conversant with the subject. The 
demand for these pumps, even in the limited 



time since their Introduction, has steadily in- 
creased wherever their merits and advantage* 
have become known, and it is safe to ai-.'ert 
that they will speedily become the most popu- 
lar in use, especially in the northern sections 
of the Union, where the cold winters affect 
the ordinary kinds to the great damage and 
inconvenience of those depending on wells for 
their water supply. 

SHIRK, JOHNSON ic FISHER, 
Grain Cradles. 
That the "old fashioned" grain cradles have 
not been entirely superseded by the modern 
harvesting machines may be seen from the 
fact that in the city of New Castle one factorv 
alone, that of Messrs. Shirk, Johnson & Fisher, 
turns out annually more than three thousand 
of these articles, the demand for which is prin- 
cipally from the states of Indiana, Ohio and 
Kentucky. This important branch of indus- 
try is the outgrowth of an enterprise inaugur- 
ated in this city upon a small scale as earlv as 
1S48 by Messrs. Shirk & Johnson, who at first 
engaged in the manufacture of plows and 
wagons. The original partnership continued 
in force for about nine years, when the firm 
name and style became Johnson & Fisher, 
who continued the business for about 1^ years 
and in the meantime erected and carried on a 
flouring mill in connection with their other 
business. The present firm of Shirk, Johnson 
«& Fisher was founded in 1S72, and the leading- 
specialty of their works is now the production 
of a superior article of grain cradles. The 
best of material is used in their construction, 
ash and hickory ot young grow th bein-j' used 
exclusively in the fingers. As only the nat- 
ural growth is adapted to these portions of the 
cradles, considerable difficulty is experienced 
in procuring the desired size and shape and a 
large annual expense is incurred for these arti- 
cles alone. The cradles manufactured bv this 
firm are recognized by agriculturists and'deal- 
ers as the best in the market, on account of 
the unvarying excellence of material em- 
ployed, thorough workmanship and strength 
of every part and the uniform reliability and 
adaptability to the purposes for which they are 
constructed. The plant of this extensive 
manufactory covers a ground space of 66x66 
feet, which is nearly all covered with substan- 
tial and conveniently arranged brick buildings 
for manufacturing purposes, equipped with 
special designs of wood working machinery 
for the manufacture of cradles, in addition to 
which is the flouring mill above mentioned, 
now leased and operated by Wr. William 
Craig. This is a two *tory structure contain- 
ing three run ot stones and has a daily eapacitv 
for manufacturing 25 barrels of flour. The in- 
dividual members of the present firm are Mr. 
James Johnson, a native of Pennsylvania, who 
was born in 1S16 and has resided in Indiana 
since 1S47; Mr. Benjamin Shirk, also a native 
of Pennsylvania, was born in 1^19, coming to 
this state" in 1846, and Mr. John M. Fisher, 
who was born in the Kevstone State in iS;? 



102 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



and has resided in Indiana since 1S54. These 
gentlemen have been for many years promi- 
nently identified with the commercial, indus- 
trial and financial interests of this section, not 
only in this special branch of business but in 
numerous others.. 



R. B. CARSON, 

• Boots and Shoes. 

A determination to secure good stock and 
reliable goods rather than the cheap and 
shoddy makes in boots and shoes has been the 
policy' of Mr. R. B. Carson since the incep- 
tion of his present mercantile house at No. 
104 East Broad St., which was established in 
1877. Commencing on a comparatively mod- 
erate scale, Mr. Carson adopted at the* outset 
the progressive policy of keeping at all times 
the best goods and selling at a moderate profit, 
not omitting the important item of keeping 
the public informed of his facilities and ad- 
vantages by a liberal use of printer's ink in 
judicious advertising. The result has been a 
steady and gratifying increase of trade until 
his annual transactions at the present time 
closely approximate $30,000 and his trade ex 
tends over a wide area of territory in Henry 
and adjacent counties. In addition to his ad- 
mirably selected stock adapted to all classes of 
city and country trade Mr. Carson makes a 
specialty of fine custom work to order and 
general repairing. Mr. Carson is a native of 
Ross county, Ohio, and was born in 1S53. He 
has resided in New Castle for the past six 
years, previous to which time he was engaged 
in the same branch of trade in other localities 
and brings to his present undertaking ripe ex- 
perience and a thorough knowledge of the 
business in all its departments. 



L. RODGERS, 

Manufacturer of Carriages, Bug- 
gies, etc., Broadway. 
The establishment at present under con- 
sideration was founded 14 years ago by the 
firm of Burle^ & Rodgers upon a compara- 
tively moderate scale, and the business was 
conducted by that firm for a period of six 
years, when Mr. Rodgers assumed the entire 
management and control of the house, and 
under his energetic and judicious administra- 
tion it has attained its present magnitude and 
proportions. Mr. Rodgers occupies a two 
story brick building 20x60 feet in dimensions 
for the wood working and painting depart- 
ment; a one story frame structure 20x30 for 
blacksmith and iron working department; a 
building 20x60 feet in size for warerooms and 
trimming shop, and a depository 20x30 feet in 
size in which finished work is constantly car- 
ried. An average force of nine skilled and 
experienced workmen is employed, and not 
less than 60 new jobs are turned out annually. 
Special attention is devoted to genera! repairs 
of every description of vehicles in both the 
iron and wood working departments, painting, 
trimming, etc., and all work turned out is 



guaranteed to be as represented. Mr. Rodgers 
is a native of Springfield, O., and learned his- 
trade in that place. He has resided in this city 
since 1S6S and has by his own efforts built up 
his present prosperous and extensive business- 
and established a claim to prominent recogni- 
tion among the leading manufacturers of 
Eastern Indiana. He is also associated with 
other important manufacturing enterprises of 
this city, noticed elsewhere in this work. 

JAMES CUMMINS, 

Grocery and Bakery. 
Mr. James Cummins, proprietor of the 
model bakery and grocery house, 113 Broad 
St., is at the present time one of the oldest 
business men in the city of New Castle, hav- 
ing been continuously engaged in mercantile 
and industrial pursuits for a period of more 
than iS years. He occupies a two story brick 
building 32x135 feet in dimensions and carries- 
in stock a fine assortment of the choicest and 
most desirable brands of staple and fancy 
family groceries and provisions, together with 
all kinds of bread, rolls, crackers, cakes, pies r 
etc., of his own manufacture. His bakery, 
which is a model of neatness, is presided over 
by a skilled and experienced baker, Mr. 
Andrew H. Martin, and h ; s establishment has 
become the recognized headquarters for good 
family bread and the best articles in his line. 
Mr. Cummins is a native of Ohio and was 
born in the city of Cincinnati in 1822. He 
has resided in Indiana since 1S62, during the 
greater portion of which time he has been 
prominently identified with the industrial and 
commercial interests of New Castle and with 
the growth, advancement and material pros- 
perity of the city. 



NATHAN LIVEZEY, 

Furniture and Undertaking, South 
Main- St. 

The subject of the present sketch, Mr. 
Nathan Livezey, is one of the pioneer settlers 
of Henry County, having come to this city 44 
years ago. He is a native of the city of Phila- 
delphia, Pa., where he was born in October,. 
1S13, and is a descendant of one of its oldest 
families. His grandfather came to America 
with William Penn, and his family name is 
associated with the history and early records 
of the Keystone State. In his boyhood days- 
and before the Quaker City had become the 
grand metropolis that it now is, he was thor- 
oughly familiar with its streets, its buildings 
and places of historic interest and possesses a 
rich fund of anecdotes and reminiscences of 
the days and events of halt a century ago. He 
is by trade a practical carpenter and cabinet 
maker and for 35 years was engaged in the 
former branch of industry in this city prior to 
embarking in his present business in 1872. 
He carries at his warerooms on Main St. a 
complete stock of both fine and common fur- 
niture, embracing common and extension 
tables, chairs, upholstered furniture, mat- 



CITY OF NEW. CASTLE. 



103 



tresses, dining room, bed room and parlor 
6ets, lounges, sofas, etc. He also devotes his 
attention to undertaking in all its branches, 
carrying in stock burial cases and caskets and 
taking entire charge of funerals, conducting 
the details of the obsequies in accordance with 
the views ar.d wishes of the friends of the de- 
ceased. He owns a fine hearse in connection 
with this branch of his business and will attend 
funerals in city or country on reasonable 
terms. Mr. Livezey has established a pros- 
perous snd successful business in both depart- 
ments of his present enterprise and enjoys a 
■wide acquaintance, embracing this and adjoin- 
ing counties. 

JOHN O. SHRINER, 

Stoves, Tinware and House Fur- 
nishing Goods, Broad St. 
As a representative establishment of its 
class may be especially mentioned that of Mr. 
John'O. Shriner, whose salesroom and manu- 
factory are located on Broad St., the salesroom 
being 15x40 feet in dimensions, with work 
shop in the rear 15x35 feet. Mr. Shriner car- 
ries in stock complete and desirable lines of 
the best varieties of improved cooking and 
heating stoves from the most noted foundries 
in the country. He also manufactures and 
deals in tin, copper and sheet iron ware and 
carries a general assortment of kitchen uten- 
sils and house furnishing goods, such as legiti- 
mately pertain to this branch of business. He 
also makes a prominent specialty of metal 
roofing, spouting, guttering, etc., and general 
jobbing and repairs. Mr. Shriner is a native 
of Germany, where he was born in 1S35, but 
came to this country with his parents when 
but five years of age. He is a practical tin- 
smith and metal worker and has been a resi- 
dent of Henry County for the past 19 years. 
He embarked in his present enterprise in 1SS1, 
since which time a steady and gratifying in- 
crease of trade has rewarded his operations 
and secured a liberal patronage. 



JIM. MOWRER, 

Drugs and Medicines, 112 South 
Main St. 

This house has been established for about 
10 years and came into the hands of the present 
proprietor in 1S79. Since that time the busi- 
ness has materially improved with each suc- 
ceeding year and the full stock and variety 
increased until now the stock carried 
will average $3,000 and the annual transac- 
tions reach about $20,000. The business 
room occupied embraces iSxSo feet in dimen- 
sions, in which is carried a full iine of pure 
drugs and medicines, all popular and desirable 
proprietary medicines, perfumes and toilet 
articles in large variety, paints, oils and var- 
nishes, window glass, lamps and fixtures, pure 
wines and liquors for medicinal and sacra- 
mental purposes, fine Havana and domestic 
cigars, books ar.d stationery, school children's 
complete outfit, wall paper, chromos, etc. A 



specialty is made of physicians' prescriptions 
and family recipes, etc. Mr. Mowrer is a 
native ot this city, where he was born in 1S47. 
He has during his life been associated with 
the business interests of this city, and as one of 
the leading enterprises of its class in this sec- 
tion of the state is this house entitled to the 
full and liberal notice here accorded. 

FAIRFIELD & MOORE, 

Groceries and Provisions, iiS SoltH 
Main St. 

One of the most thoroughly stocked and 
neady kept establishments of its class in this 
city is the fine grocery and provision store of 
Messrs. Fairfield & Moore, located at n5 
South Main St. Here this house occupies for 
business purposes three floors, 19XS2 feet in 
dimensions, in which is carried a full line of 
groceries and provisions, embracing all desira- 
ble articles for home and table supplv. Asso- 
ciated with this department of trade is also 
glassware, queensware, table and pocket cut- 
lery, etc. This business wasoriginallv started 
by C. & B. Fairfield, then located on "the cor- 
ner, a few doors north of its present location. 
In 1S77 E. A: B. Fairfield erected the block 
now occupied and took possession of their pres- 
ent quarters. In 1S74 tne ^ rm name was 
changed to Fairfield Bros., and continued in 
that firm name for about six years. The busi- 
ness was then carried on alone by Mr. B. Fair- 
field, on the retirement of his brother, up to 
April, 1SS3, at which time the present firrr. 
was organized. ^ .This house now enjovs a 
trade embracing the best families of this'citv 
and surrounding country and its annual trans- 
actions will compare favorably with the best 
houses of its class in this section of the state. 
The individual members of the firm are E. 
Fairfield and Albert Moore, both of whom are 
natives of Ohio and have had an extended ex- 
perience in this department of trade. 



JUNCTION TAVERN, 

G. W. Goodwin, Jr., Proprietor. 
Among those enterprises which attract the 
widest public consideration, there are none 
which are of more interest than our well kept 
and furnished hostleries. The unique and old 
time name adopted by this house is suggestive 
of its association with the past and present and 
cannot fail to receive the attention ot the trav- 
eling public. This house came into the posses- 
sion of its present proprietor, Mr. G. W. Good- 
win, Jr., in October, 1SS3, since which time it 
has been completely refitted and furnished, and 
under its present management has taken rank 
among the best equipped and conducted hotels 
of the state. The sleeping apartment- are ele- 
gantly furnished, well lighted and ventilated 
and are kept in the best order. The dining 
room has a seating capacity ot 30 to 4^ j;ue^>. 
while special pains are taken to pro\ ide the 
table with the best the market affords. An 
ample force of asv.^unU insure to guests 
every attention and courteous treatment, and 



104 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



it is the determination ofits managers to secure 
for the "Junction Tavern" al! those comforts 
which make it one of the most inviting resorts 
to the traveling public. Mr. G. W. Goodwin, 

ii\,is a native of this state, where he was born 
i 1841. His grandfather, Mr. Wesley Good- 
win, was among the early "tavern" keepers of 
this section, while his father was for many 
years engaged in the mercantile business in 
this citv. 



NEW CASTLE FURNITURE CO., 

Manufacturers of Furniture, West 
Broad St. 

The manufacture of fine and common fur- 
niture has become one of the most important 
of our national resources and has attained a 
degree of perfection that entitles it to rank 
among the industrial arts. Occupying de- 
servedly a prominent position among the 
representative manufacturing establishments 
of the West, in this special department of pro- 
ductive industry is the New Castle Furniture 
Company, whose extensive works and sales 
rooms are located on We?t Broad St. The 
present works are the outgrowth of an enter- 
prise which was inaugurated in this city in 
1876 by Mr. Jacob Brenneman, one of our 
oldest and most highly respected citizens and 
enterprising business men, who conducted the 
business until May 1, 1SS3, when the present 
stock company was organized and incorporated 
under the laws of the State of Indiana with a 
capital of $7,500. The sales department is 
located in a spacious two story brick building 
and two rooms, one 20\6o and one zoxSo feet 
in dimensions are filled with the products of 
their factory, embracing all grades of fine and 
common furniture, parlor, chamber, library, 
dining room and kitchen sets, extension tables, 
office furniture, etc. The works and adjacent 
grounds occupy a space of about one half an 
acre, and the factory proper is equipped with 
the latest and most approved special designs 
of wood-working machinery propelled by one 
sixty horse power engine and boiler. Fourteen 
skilled and experienced workmen are regularly 
employed in the manufacturing department, 
and only the best material is used, the service- 
able and elegant woods indigeneous to our 
native forests furnishing an unlimited supply 
of the most desirable lumber for this special 
purpose. The facilities enjoyed by this com- 
pany for procuring their supplies and for 
economically conducting their extensive busi- 
ness are not surpassed by those of any con- 
temporaneous establishment East or West, 
and the furniture turned out by them will not 
suffer by a critical comparison with the most 
elegant'and serviceable made in this country, 
while their prices will b? found to be uniformly 
the lowest consistent with reliable workman- 
ship and first-class material. The individual 
members of the company and its officers as 
at present organized arc, Leonidas Rodgers, 
President; W. N. Clift, Secretary and Treas- 
urer; Luther Hennegh, Superintendent; F. 
M. Allender, Geo. Bienneman, M. Vestal and 



Henry Hernley. These gentlemen are well 
and favorably known in commercial circles as 
among our most enterprising, energetic, liberal 
and public spirited citizens, and since the for- 
mation of the company, whose affairs they 
have so successfully managed, thev have in- 
fused new life and'energy into the business, 
extending the scope of "its operations and 
established a demand for its products, reaching 
far beyond the limits of Henry county and 
even to remote portions of the state. 



BUNDY HOUSE. 

Josiah Bundy & Sox.s, Proprietors, 
Main and West Race Sts. 
If, as some writers assert, the character of 
its hotels is an index of the thrift, prosperity 
and enterprise of a community, the visitor to 
New Castle who is fortunate to secure accom- 
modations at the Bundy House cannot but 
form a favorable impression of this prosperous 
and progressive municipality. This popular 
hostelry, acknowledged to be the leading hotel 
of the city, was erected in 185S by Jerrie Page 
and opened by him for the accommodation of 
guests in the same year. He was succeeded 
by Mr. John Taylor, who successfully con- 
ducted the business for 15 years. The "subse- 
quent proprietors were Messrs. French, Oliver 
Wilburn and Hoover, in the order named, the 
latter being succeeded in 1S76 by the present 
management, by whom extensive additions 
and improvements were made, a new story 
added, giving ten more sleeping apartments, 
and the entire building renovated and refur- 
nished in modorn metropolitan style. The lot 
upon which the Bundy House is situated is 
134x134 feet in dimensions, at the corner of 
Main and West Race Sts., opposite the Court 
House, upon which, in addition to the hotel 
building, is erected a commodious and conve- 
niently arranged stable, with ample accommo- 
dations for the horses and carriages of guests, 
and in connection with which is also a liverv 
stable, with a number of horses and vehicles of 
different descriptions to let upon reasonable 
terms. The Bundy House, which is specially 
arranged for the convenience of patrons nnd 
guests, contains 50 well furnished and com- 
fortable rooms, which are kept in the best of 
order at all times. On the first floor is located 
a spacious and well arranged office, a reading 
and writing room, baggage and wash rooms^ 
kitchen and dining room, the latter with a 
seating capacity of 35 guests. On this floor 
are also two large sample rooms, for the use of 
commercial travelers, a spacions reception 
room and two family rooms. On the second 
floor are the main parlors and a number of 
finely furnished guest chambers, while the 
third floor is devoted exclusively to sleeping 
apartments. The rates at the Bundy House 
have been placed at the popular price of $2.00 
per day to transient guests, with liberal allow- 
ances made for those desiring to remain a 
week or more. This popular hotel derives its 
patronage principally from the traveling pub- 
lic and is the recognized headquarters in this 



CITY OF NEW CASTLE. 



105 



city for commercial travelers and business 
men. Mr. Josiah Bundy, the senior member 
of the firm, is a native and lifelong resident of 
Indiana and was born in 1823. He is ably 
assisted in the management of the hotel by his 
two sons, Charles Frank and O. P. Bundy, who 
are also practical hotel men. The long ex- 
perience of both father and sons in catering to 
the wants of their guests, and their extended 
acquaintance with the traveling public ensures 
to the Bundy House a liberal patronage from 
the better class of trade and a reputation ex- 
tending to all sections of the Union. 



W. G. HILLOCK, 

The Jeweler, 117 East Broadway. 
This house was originally established in 
1S68 and is the oldest jewelry house in this 
city, and not only for its established character 
but as well for the superiority of its stock is it 
entitled to prominent mention in a review of 
the operative enterprises of this citv and state. 
The. premises occupied are located at No. 117 
East Broadway and embrace a fine business 
room 14x42 feet in dimensions, in which is 
carried a full and complete assortment of the 
best watches and clocks of both foreign and 
American manufacture, jewelry, silver and 
plated ware, spectacles and eye-glasses, etc., 
where all goods are guaranteed as represented. 
Mr. Hillock is a native of Ohio and was born 
in Mahoning County in 1S44. He is a practi- 
cal jeweler and learned this business in 
Youngstown, O., coming to this city in April, 
1S6S, and has been constantly engaged in this 
branch of business since that time. From a 
comparatively small beginning he has estab- 
lished his present successful business, which 
in extent will compare favorably with that 
of any other jewelry house in this section of 
the state. Mr. Hillock makes a leading spe- 
cialty of fine watch repairing, in which his 
ability and skill is unsurpassed for reliable 
work. Not only as one of the leading estab- 
lishments of the kind in this section of the 
state, but also for its stability and enterprise, is 
this house entitled to the liberal notice here 
accorded. 



T. C. JORDAN, 

Boots and Shoes, No. 10S Broadway. 
Although among the recent accessions to 
our commercial establishments, the house 
conducted by Mr. T. C. Jordan at No. 10S 
Broadway ha-> attained a reputation entitling 
it to rank with any of its older contemporaries 
and among the leading houses of its class in 
Eastern Indiana. Established as recentlv as 
March, 1SS3, by Messrs. Millikan & Jordan, 
the business passed into the sole possession of 
Mr. Jordan in the following August. The 
salesroom, which is 20x65 tcet " n dimensions, 
is neatly and tastefully arranged, fitted up and 
furnished in modern metropolitan style and 
stocked with a choice and desirable" assort- 
ment of the finer grades and common varie- 
ties of boots, shoes and rubbers for ladies', 



gentlemen's, misses' and children's wear. The 
stock is new, fresh and comprehensive, em- 
bracing every variety of merchandise in this 
line, from the most noted manufacturers of the 
East, and is constantly replenished by fresh 
arrivals. Mr. Jordan is a native of Franklin 
County, Pa., born in 1S33, Dut nas resided in 
Henry County since the spring of 1856. He 
has been for many years engaged in the boot 
and shoe trade, is a'thorough judge of mate- 
rial, workmanship and values, and all repre- 
sentations made by him or his employes will 
be found to accord* strictlv with fact-." 



C. E. NEEDHAM, 

Drugs, Books and Stationery, Broad- 
way and Main Sts. 
This house was established by Mr. Need- 
ham in November, 1SS2, and occupies for 
business purposes two floors, each 22.X4S feet 
in dimensions. In the drug department is 
carried a full and complete line of drugs, medi- 
cines and chemicals, the standard and most 
reliable proprietary remedies of the day, 
toilet articles and perfumery, druggists' sun- 
dries, cigars, tobacco, etc., while special atten- 
tention is dovoted to the accura'.e preparation 
of physicians' prescriptions and family recipes. 
The book department is supplied with an ad- 
mirably selected assortment of standard and 
miscellaneous books, including works on his- 
tory, biography, science, theology, poetry, 
romance, etc., school books in great variety 
and full lines of commercial, legal and epis- 
tolary stationery, biank books, etc. The stock 
in each department is new, fresh and desira- 
ble, selected with an express view to the re- 
quirements of the trade in this section, and 
the various articles are offered at a very small 
advance above cost. Mr. Needham is a native 
of Henry County and was born in 1S59. Al- 
though yet a young man, he has enjoyed an 
extended experience in the business in which 
he is er.gaged and his establishment has 
already taken a high rank among its contem- 
poraries as one of the leading mercantile en- 
terprises of Henry County. 



G. H. ROOT, 

Meat Market, No. 104 North Main 

Street. 
Contributing to the convenience of our citi- 
zens, the daily market of G. H. Root chums 
libera! mention in the present review of New- 
Castle's resources. Although established as 
recently as in 1S82, this house has secured a 
liberal patronage among the better cie.ss of 
trade and now slaughters annually about 500 
head of beeves and a proportionate number of 
sm liler animals. This market, which is 20x36 
feet in dimensions, is fitted up in a neat and 
attractive style and thoroughly equipped with 
all the requisite appliances, including one of 
Steven's improved coolers or refrigerating 
rooms for the preservation of meats de.ring 
the warm season. Mr, Rov*. carries it all 
times the best varieties of fresh r.nd salt meats, 



106 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



game, poultry, sausages, etc., in their seasons, 
and enjoys the finest facilities for furnishing 
patrons with the choicest articles at the most 
reasonable rates. Mr. G. H. Root is a native 
of Virginia and was born in 1829. He re- 
ceived his early education in the now historic 
Shenandoah Valley, but has resided in this 
county for the past 22 years, formerly engaged 
in agricultural pursuits. 



W. M. PENCE, 

Drugs, Books, Stationery, Wall 
Paper, etc., West Broadway. 
Nearly a quarter ot a century has elapsed 
since the foundation of the popular pharmacy 
and stationery house now conducted by Mr. 
\V. M. Pence, on West Broadway, which was 
originally established in this city as early as 
1859 by Messrs. Haskit & Boor, and after 
various changes in the personcl of its manage- 
ment came into the possession of the present 
proprietor in 1868. The premises occupied 
are 18x65 feet in dimensions, and in addition 
to this is a warehouse 1SX40 feet in size, used 
for the storage of original packages, etc. Mr. 
Pence carries at all times a full line of the 
purest and freshest drugs and chemicals, pro- 
prietary medicines, paints, oils, varnishes and 
painters' supplies, school and miscellaneous 
books, gold pens, fine commercial, legal and 
other stationery, window glass, wall paper 
and hangings of the latest designs, window 
shades and fixtures, druggists' and stationers' 
sundries, etc. He also makes a prominent 
specialty of filling physicians' prescriptions 
and family recipes accurately and carefully, 
using only the best ingredients known in 
materia medica. Mr. Pence is a native and 
lifelong resident of Indiana and was born in 
1S43. He has during his residence in New- 
Castle been prominently identified with the 
growth, prosperity and material welfare of the 
city. He was one of the founders of the Citi- 
zens' State Bank, with which he is still con- 
nected. He served for one term as City 
reasurer and for several years as a member 
of the Town Board of Council, presiding over 
that body for the last two years of his mem- 
bership with an impartiality and ability which 
was recognized and appreciated by his fellow 
members and his constituency. 



H. T. COFFIN, 
Jewelek. 
As one of the leading houses of New Castle 
we mention that of Mr. H. T. Coffin, located 
on East Broad St., where in a handsomely ar- 
ranged and attractive salesroom may be found 
at all times a desirable and well selected stock 
of imported and American watches, clocks, 
jewelry of all kinds, solid silver and plated 
ware, "spectacles, eye-glasses, etc. This well 
known house was established in 1S73 and dur- 
ing the past decade its business has rapidly 
increased and will to-day compare favorably 
with that of any similar house in this section of 
the state. Mr. Coffin, who is a practical 



watchmakerof more than 15 years experience 
in the business, devotes his personal attention 
to fine watch repairing, aud being thoroughly 
conversant with the various styles and peculi- 
arities of both foreign and American manu- 
facturers and with the delicate mechanism of 
each, is prepared to guarantee all work in this 
line and to give the most perfect satisfaction, 
both in reliability of workmanship and price. 
Mr. Coffin makes a specialty of fine goods for 
holiday and wedding gifts, "and all representa- 
tions made by him as to quality or value may 
be implicitly relied upon. 



JOHN C. LIVEZEY & CO., 
Hardware. 

The trade in these articles at the present 
day constitutes a distinct and one of the most 
important departments of commercial enter- 
prise, which is ably represented in New Cas- 
tle by the enterprising firm of John C. Live- 
zey ii Co., whose well known establishment 
is eligibly located on Main St., opposite the 
Court House, where two entire floors each 
22^x100 feet in dimensions are devoted to the 
storage and display of a large and compre- 
hensive assortment of shelf and papered hard- 
ware, building materials, agricultural and 
mechanics' tools and implements, fine import- 
ed and American table and pocket cutlery, 
house furnishing goods and a full line ot gen- 
eral and miscellaneous merchandise legiti- 
mately pertaining to this special branch of 
trade. This representative house was estab- 
lished in 1S66 and during the past years has 
built up a lucrative and flourishing trade, ex- 
tending throughout the city and surrounding 
towns and country. Mr. John C. Livezey is 
a native and lifelong resident of Indiana, and 
his extended experience in mercantile life and 
in this special branch thereof renders him 
thoroughly conversant with the requirements 
of the trade in this section, where he is well 
and favorably known. 



GOUGH & 1IERNLY, 

Livery, Feed and Sale Stable, West 

Broadway. 
The finest, most commodious and thor- 
oughly equipped livery, feed and sale stables 
in Henry County are those conducted by 
Messrs. Gough & Hernly, on West Broad- 
way, New Castle, which although established 
as recently as 1SS2, have already become 
favorably known throughout the citv and ad- 
jacent territory and secured a liberal share of 
the public patronage. The building occupied 
for stabling purposes is a substantial and con- 
veniently arranged brick structure two stories 
in height and 40x132 feet in dimensions, fitted 
upexp.essly for the purposes for which it is 
occupied. "Messrs. Gough St Hernly keep for 
livery purposes 10 first class horses and 
numerous buggies, carriages and other vehi- 
cles suitable for business or pleasure purposes, 
and have ample facilities for the accommoda- 
tion of 50 horses in the boarding department. 



CITY OF NEW CASTLE. 



107 



They also conduct an extensive business in 
the sales department, buying and selling trot- 
ting, family, road and draft horses, and in ad- 
dition to their stables they carry on a general 
blacksmith, wagon making and repair shop, 
where they are prepared to manufacture to 
order any description of light or heavy wagons 
and to execute job work of all kinds in the 
iron or wood working department, also paint- j 
ing, trimming, etc., done at most reasonable 
rates and in the most thorough and work- 
manlike manner. The individual members of j 
the firm, Messrs. Thomas VV. Gough and 
Henry L. Hernly are both natives of this 
state, and since embarking in their present 
successful enterprise have established a lucra- 
tive and prosperous trade throughout the city 
and adjacent towns. They offer at their sta- 
bles the best facilities for conveying traveling 
men to distant points on most reasonable 
terms. 



legitimately pertaining to this important 
branch of trade. In addition to the proprietor, 
who devotes his personal attention to the busi- 
ness, two assistants are regularly employed, 
and a large and lucrative trade is transacted' 
extending not only throughout the city, but to 
all parts of the county, it being now the olde-t 
established grocery ' house in New Cattle. 
Mr. Arnold, who is a native o! Ohio, was born 
in 1S39, and during the war of the rebellion 
served with much credit and honor in the 5th 
Ohio Cavalry, participating in many of the 
mo>t important and memorable engagements 
of the war. He was captured by the enemy at 
the battle of Corinth and retained for several 
months as a prisoner of war in the hi-tcric 
strongholds of Libby Prison and Belle Isle. 



W. A. GROVES & SON, 
Meat Market. 
One of the principal meat markets of New 
Castle is that conducted by Messrs. W. A. 
Groves & Son, which was established in Sep- 
tember, 1882, and which has met with a most 
gratifying degree of success and encourage- 
ment since that time. The members of the 
firm purchase only the best stock, which they 
slaughter at their own yards, and at the pres- 
ent time require for their local trade five j 
beeves and a considerable number of small ] 
■stock weekly. Their storeroom is supplied at j 
all times with the choicest varieties of fresh, 1 
salt and smoked meats, which by reason of 
the facilities enjoyed by them for procuring 
their supplies they are enabled to offer to their j 
patrons at the most reasonable rates. Mr. W. 
A. Groves is a native of Ohio, and his son, 
Mr. D. Groves, was born in Wayne County, 
Ind. They are both practically conversant 
•\vith the business of slaughtering, dressing 
and curing meat for the trade and the success 
which has attended their career since embark- 
ing in their present enterprise has been secured 
by their individual efforts, application to busi- 
ness and their honorable methods of dealing. 



SAMUEL ARNOLD, 

Staple and Fancy Groceries, No. 106 

Broad St. 
While reviewing the representative business 
houses of the thriving city of New Castle, we 
cannot omit special mention of the old estab- 
lished and popular family grocery store of Mr. 
Samuel Arnold, located at No. 106 Broad St., 
which was established in 1S69, and has since 
that time been recognized by our citizens as 
one of the leading houses of its class in Henry 
County. Mr. Arnold occupies at this location 
for sales and storage purposes two floors, each 
15x75 feet in dimensions, carrying in stock a 
full and complete line of the choicest varieties 
and brands of staple and fancy family grocer- 
ies and provisions, embracing all articles 



WINT. NEEDHAM, 
Photographer. 
Wint Needham, at his fine 'art gallery, No. 
121 South Main St., exhibits an array of pic- 
tures which will compare favorably with tho-e 
of any metropolitan establishment. His rooms 
are located on the first floor and are fitted up 
in an attractive style and supplied with the 
most approved modern appliances and appa- 
ratus, with cameras adapted to all sizes and 
descriptions of pictures, from the smallest 
minatures to the largest groups or life size 
photographs. Mr. Needham has had a practi- 
cal experience of more than 17 years in the 
photographic business, the greater portion of 
which time. has been spent in this city, and is 
thoroughly conversant with all branches of the 
business, both in the mechanical and artistic 
departments, and keeps himself well informed 
upon all matters pertaining thereto. At the 
outbreak of the rebellion Mr. Needham, who 
is a native of this state, enlisted as a musician 
in the 57th regiment of Indiana Volunteers, 
October iSth, 1S61, and received an honorable 
discharge July 1st, 1S65, after serving lor 44 
months and 10 days, during which period he 
participated in many of the most eventful and 
exciting campaigns of that memorable strife, 
including the battles of Stone River and Mis- 
sion Ridge, the siege of Atlanta and the cam- 
paigns and engagements of New Hope, Love- 
joy, etc. His gallery forms one of the 
attractions of New Castle, and a cordial invi- 
tation is extended to citizens and strangers to 
call an examine the works of art which adorn 
the walls of his studios and reception rooms. 



ARCADE BILLIARD HALL, 

G. W. Goodwin, Jr., Proprietor. 
The most attractive and finely furnished re- 
sort in New Castle, where gentlemen may 
while away a leisure hour in the tascinating 
and fashionable game of billiards, is known as 
the "Arcade Billiard Hall," located on Broad- 
way and conducted by Mr. G. W. Goodwin, 
Jr." This is an orderly and well kept estab- 
lishment, where music lends its charms, and 
the choicest varieties of liquid refreshments 
add to the social and convivial attractions. 



108 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



The Arcade building was erected in 1881 by 
Messrs. Hipes Bros., and the saloon proper is 
a commodious and elegant hall, 16 feet high 
in the clear and 2SxSo feet in dimensions; is 
approached by a spacious entrance way 10x80 
feet in size. Both have a handsome and sub- 
stantial concrete floor, and the interior decora- 
tions and appointments are first class in every 
particular. Three elegant modern billiard and 
pool tables of the celebrated J. M. Brunswick 
& Balke make occupy the center of this hand- 
some apartment, while an orchestrian playing 32 
different airs discourses exquisite music during 
the day and evening. This instrument, which 
is one of the finest of its class, cost $1,400 and 
the musical selections embrace the most pop- 
ular operatic and martial music of the day. 
The bar is elegantly finished, as is also the 
entire room, and an elegant plate glass mir- 
ror 5x10 feet in size reflects the polished glass- 
ware of the bar, the brilliant lights and fine 
effects of this model temple of pleasure. Mr. 
Goodwin is a native of Henry County and 
was born in 1844. He also conducts the Junc- 
tion "Tavern," which is noticed elsewhere in 
this work. 

CLINT DAVIS, 

Cigars, Tobaccos, Canned Goods, Con- 

FECTIONARIES, &C, SOUTH MAIN St. 

This house was opened by its present pro- 
prietor, Mr. Clint Davis, as recently as No- 
vember, 18S3, and is located on South Main 
street. The room is occupied for office and 
business purposes which is 12x30 feet in di- 
mensions, in which is carried a choice stock 
of chewing and smoking tobaccos, fine 
Havana and domestic cigars, canned goods, 
confectionaries, etc. Mr. Davis is a native of 
this county, where he was born in 1S40. His 
father, Mr. Eli Davis, was one of the self-made 
men of this section of the state, and was for 
many years one of the leading citizens of this 
county, and a resident of Lewisville. 



J. M. GOUGH, 

Farm and Spring Wagons, Agriccl- 
tural Implements, &c, Broadway 
near East Depot, 
Mr. J. M. Gough is manufacturer of Bug- 
gies, Farm and Spring Wagons, and dealer 
in improved varieties of agricultural imple- 
ments and farm machinery. 

Mr. Gough commenced business in this city 
as early as 186S on a comparatively small 
scale, and by strict application to business and 
a conscientious fulfillment of contracts has 
established a thriving and prosperous trade, 
necessitating at the present time, the occu- 
pancy of a commodious two and one-half 
story brick building 50x100 feet in dimensions 
for storage, sales and manufacturing purposes. 
Mr. Gough employs five skilled and experi- 
enced workmen, turning out annually about 
fifty farm wagons, ten buggies and an equal 
number of spring wagons. He also carries 
on a general blacksmithing, horse-shoeing and 



repairing business, painting, trimming, and is- 
exclusive agent in this county for the cele- 
brated Moline Plows, the Dayton Champion 
Sulkies, and Buckeye Reapers, Hay Rakes 
and Wheat Drills, all of which articles he 
furnishes to patrons at factory prices. Mr. 
Gough is a native and life long resident of 
Indiana, and was born in 1838. Previous to 
embarking in his present successful enterprise 
he conducted a plow manufactory in this city 
for about five years and was also identified 
with the same branch of industry in Indianapo- 
lis and also at Richmond In this State. In 
1S61 he enlisted in Co. I, 8th Indiana Infantry, 
served in the Shenandoah Valley under Capt. 
Tykle, and was in the battle of Rich Moun- 
tain serving through the campaign and receiv- 
ing an honorable discharge. 

M. A. HEIRICH, 

Merchant Tailor, East Broadway. 
Among those commercial enterprises which 
contribute to the material welfare of a pro- 
gressive community there are few which de- 
serve more liberal consideration than such as 
promote aesthetic taste in gentlemen's wearing 
apparel. Among the recent accessions to this 
department in this city is the fine merchant 
tailoring establishment of Mr. M. A. Heirich, 
which was opened on East Broadway, Novem- 
ber, 1SS3. Here, a fine business room is occu- 
pied, which is 20x40 feet in dimensions, in 
which is carried a full line of newest cloths, 
casslmeres and suitings, from both American 
and foreign looms, embracing an assortment 
which will present all the advantages of 
metropolitan establishments. He gives em- 
ployment to only first-class workmen, and 
guarantees to his patrons not only fashionable 
garments and perfect fits, but also prices which 
will compare favorably with any other estab- 
lishment of the kind in "the State. Mr. Heirich 
is a native of Cincinnati, O., and has been 
associated with this department of trade for 
many years. He not onl_y enjoys the amplest 
facilities but also that experience and culture 
which enables him to compete with the best 
merchant tailoring establishments in the State. 
He is a practical cutter and has been associated 
with some of the best houses of this class j.n 
the state. 



NEW CASTLE FLOUR MILLS, 
Rhine, Miller & Co. 
Special attention is directed to the operations 
of the New Castle Flour Mills, now conducted 
by the firm of Rhine, Miller & Co., to whom 
may be directly ascribed a large share of the 
vitality which has characterized the business 
within the past twelve months. These model 
mills were erected in 1SS1, and are the largest 
of the kind in Henry county, and among the 
finest and most thoroughly equipped in East- 
ern Indiana. The main building, which is 
three and one-half stories in height and 40x50 
feet in dimensions, contains all the latest im- 
proved machinery and apparatus for producing 



CITY OF NEW CASTLE. 



10» 



the best quality of flour by the now popular 
new process system, which is universally re- 
garded by dealers and consumers superior to 
that of anr other in use. In addition to the 
main building is an engine and boiler house 
24x40 feet in size, containing a 65 horse power 
engine which furnishes the motive power for 
the machinery employed. Five assistants are 
regularly employed under the immediate di- 
rection of Messrs. Rhine and Miller, who are 
both practical and experienced millers, who 
have devoted the greater portion of their lives 
to this special branch of industrial enterprise. 
The mills have a capacity for turning out one 
hundred barrels of choice flour every twenty- 
four hours, which meets with a ready sale, not 
only in the local markets, but in the principal 
cities of the East to which large quantities are 
weekly shipped. The individual members of 
the firm are John Rhine, F. G. Miller, D. M. 
Spaulding and A. F. Spaulding, whose enter- 
prise and energy have exerted no inconsider- 
able influence upon the commercial and indus- 
trial thrift of this community. 

CITIZENS' STATE BANK. 

Contingent upon, and intimately identified 
with the commercial thrift and industrial re- 
sources of the city of New Castle, the Citizens' 
State Bank is justly regarded in this commu- 
nity as one of the most solid conservative and 
responsible financial and fiduciary institutions 
in this section of the state. Organized under 
the State Banking Laws, July 1, 1673, with a 
cash capital of ^130,000 the* bank became a 
success from its very inception under the 
management and direction of" its efficient offi- 
cers, John R. Millikan. President; Benj. Shirk, 
Vice President; D. W. Kinsey, Cashier, and 
Thomas B. Millikan, Assistant Cashier. The 
present capital and accumulated surplus ex- 
ceeds $140,000, and the official statements 
present a most excellent and satisfactory ex- 
hibit. A general banking business in all its 
branches is transacted, deposits received, loans 
made on undoubted security, collections at- 
tended to in all sections of the Union. Gov- 
ernment, State and Corporation bonds nego- 
tiated, and all legitimate matters of a financial 
character promptly and satisfactorily attended 
to. The present officers have been connected 
with the affairs of the Citizens' State Bank 
since its organization, and it is safe to assert 
that no similar institution in the state possesses 
a higher rank either on the score of solvency 
or judicious management. 

ROBERT B. SMITH, 

Agricultural Implements, Buggies, 
Etc.; also Insurance Agent. 
Mr. Robert Smith, who is a native of Vir- 
ginia, was born in 1S34. He has, however, 
resided in Indiana for many years, and was 
engaged in thf dry goods trade in New Castle 
for a period of about sixteen years. During 
the interval he was engaged in agricultural 
pursuits up to the spring of 1SS3 when he 



opened his present establishment for the sale- 
of agricultural implements and buggies, repre- 
senting as sole agent in this section many or the 
best known and most popular manufacturers 
of these articles, among which may be especial- 
ly mentioned, Deere & Co., of'Moline, 111.;, 
the Columbus Buggy Co., of Ohio; the Piano- 
Manufacturing Co., of Illinois; the Huber 
Manufacturing Co., of Marion, Ohio; S. Pen- 
nock & Son's Co., at Kennett Square, Pa.,, 
manufacturers of road making machinery. la- 
the line of improved agricultural machinery 
and implements Mr. Smith offers to the farm- 
ers of Henry county and vicinity the most de- 
sirable articles now before the public, which 
by special arrangements with the manufac- 
turers he is enabled to offer at factory prices 
while his stock of fine buggies commend his 
house to the favorable consideration and most 
critical examination of those desiring service- 
able, durable and stylish vehicles at reasonable 
rates. His business occupies a building zzx. 
100 feet in dimension, and as agent for promi- 
nent fire insurance companies, he represents 
the following: ..Etna, of Hartford, Conn.;. 
Underwriters Agency, of New York City; 
Union Fire In. Co., of California; Franklin, 
of Indianapolis; Howard, of New York, and 
Germania, of New York. 



BALDWIN, ROBERTS & CO., 
Pork Packers. 

This business was originally started about 
11 years ago. In 1S75 it came into the hands 
of the present company, which is formed from 
two Boston houses — James W. Roberts & Co. 
and Baldwin, Farnum & Co. The buildings 
and grounds occupy a space of about two 
acres and the annual transactions will aggre- 
gate about $400,000. 

A. R. WAYMAN, 

Groceries, Broadway. 
Commencing business in this city in 1S73. 
with very moderate means, Mr. Wa_\ man de- 
ter mined at the outset to command the re-poct 
and patronage of his fellow citizens, by con- 
ducting his establishment upon strict business 
principles. Determined "to lead, rather than 
compete." his stock, though small, was of the 
best, and his prices the most reasonable con- 
sistent with fair dealing. His trade from the 
very beginning increased steadily until at the 
present time his establishment is one ot the 
leading ones of its class in Henry Co., and his 
annual transactions range from $'^5,000 to $30,- 
000. Mr. Way man occupies for the display and 
storage of his extensive stock of staple and 
fancy groceries two entire floors, each 25x125 
feet "in dimensions, where four assistants are 
regularly employed. The most perfect order 
and system characterizes every department of 
his business. His stock comprises the choicest 
varieties of articles pertaining to this depart- 
ment of commerce, selected by Mr. Wayman 
expressly for his local trade. Mr. Wayman is 
a native" and litelong resident of Indiana and 



110 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



has by his own unaided efforts and strict atten- 
tion to business risen from the lower rounds 
■of the ladder to his present position at the head 
•of one of the most extensive and important 
•mercantile houses in this section of the state. 

G. E. MAHIN & CO., 

Groceries and Bakery, East Broad 
Street. 

Among the growing and enterprising 
houses for home and table supplies of the city, 
is that of Messrs. G. E. Mahin & Co., on East 
Broad St., where a salesroom .20x60 feet in 
•dimensions, fitted up in a neat and attractive 
metropolitan style, is stocked to its utmost 
storage capacity with an admirably selected 
.and desirable stock of fine family groceries, 
teas, sugars, syrups, coffees, spices, fruits, 
vegetables, provisions, notions, grocers' sun- 
dries, canned goods and general merchandise 
pertaining to this line for table and culinary 
purposes. This representative house was es- 
tablished July 17th, 1SS2, and although among 
the' youngest of our business houses, it has 
.already secured a large and steadily increasing 
trade, its annual transactions at the present 
time ranging from $10,000 to $15,000. The 
individual members of the firm are G. E. 
Mahin and his father, M. Mahin, the latter a 
native of Ohio and the former of this county. 

Bakery Department. — This house has 
recently added a bakery to the increasing 
business and will be prepared to supply the 
-choicest fresh bread, buns, rolls, cakes, pies, 
•etc. They employ one of the most expe- 
rienced bakers in this section of the state and 
will be prepared to supply families with the 
best in the market in this line. They will 
also supply promptly to order fine cakes for 
■weddings or parties on short notice. They 
will also furnish bread or cakes to grocers and 
•dealers at all railroad towns within a radius of 
50 miles at the most liberal terms. 

They both devote their personal attention 
to the management of their business and 
•employ one assistant in the sales department. 
Although the trade of this house is largely of 
a local character, it numbers among its regu- 
lar patrons many of the best families in the 
surrounding towns of this and adjacent coun- 
ties. 



J. U. KEISER, 

Saloon and Billiard Hall, South 

Main St. 

Mr. Keiser has been a resident of this city 

for the past thirty years, and in various ways 

connected with its mercantile interests. He 

commenced business in his present location in 

June, 1S81, conducting a general restaurant 
and dining hall, continuing the business until 
September of the same year, when he changed 
the business to that in which he is now en- 
gaged. The premises occupied embraces a 
room 20x62 feet in dimensions, in which he 

•conducts one of the best equipped bars to be 
found in this section of the State, embracing 



the choicest brands of foreign and American 
products in old whiskeys, wines and liquors, 
beer, ale, tobaccos and cigars. He has recent- 
ly re-fitted his room, which contains one bill- 
iard and two pool tables of the Brunswick & 
Balke manufacture, known as the Monarch, 
and keeps one of the most orderly houses, 
patronized by traveling men and the best 
class of citizens. Mr. Keiser is a native of 
Switzerland, where he was born in 1S35, com- 
ing to this country in 1S51 and soon after 
seiect ; ng this citvas his place of residence. 
He is a practical jeweler and for some years 
devoted his attention to this business, erecting 
the fine business block on Ea^t Broad St., 
now occupied by G. W. Hillock, and in his 
long and honorable association with the busi- 
ness interests of this city is justly entitled to 
the notice here accorded. 

C. C. COLBURN, 

Livery, Sale and Feed Stables, East 
Broad St. 
The city of New Castle contains many indi- 
viduals who may appropriately be classed 
among the representative self made men of 
the day, but few whose career from infacy has 
been attended with greater disadvantages in 
manv respects or crowned with more gratify- 
ing success than that of Mr. C. C. Colburn, 
the subject of the present sketch and proprie- 
tor of the well known and popular livery, feed, 
and sale stables, located on East Broad St. 
Born in North Carolina in 1S34, a slave, his 
infancy was passed amid the depressing sur- 
roundings of the old slavery days, but while 
yet a boy he was permitted to breathe the air 
of freedom, coming to Indiana in childhood, 
nearly half a century ago, before he had suf- 
fered' any of the inconveniences or disad- 
vantages of the system under which he was 
born. Reared and educated in the land of the 
free, Mr. Colburn early in life determined to 
achieve success, and his career has been char- 
acterized by the exercise of those traits of in- 
dustry, integrity and energy, which have met 
their legitimate reward in the accumulation of 
a handsome competency and a flourishing and 
lucrative business. Mr. Colburn now owns 
the house in which he resides, valued at not 
less than $S,ooo, and also the commodious two 
story brick stables 36x132 feet in dimensions, 
with metal roof, in which his business is con- 
ducted. He keeps from 10 to 12 fine horses 
for livery purposes, with numerous stylish and 
serviceable vehicles, and in his boarding and 
sales department has ample accommodations 
for 120 horses. Asadealerin trotting, family, 
saddle and draft horses, Mr. Colburn has es- 
tablished a reputation for reliability and strict 
integrity which ensures for him the confidence 
of all with whom he has had business trans- 
actions. 1 



Among the other more important firms do- 
ing business are the following: 

Dry Goods, Boots, Shoes, Clothing and 



CITY OF NEW CASTLE. 



Ill 



Groceries:— Campbell Bros., Schrock & 
Bundy, T. W. Phillips, J. C. McBride, R. D. 
Goodwin & Co., T. R. Vattghan & Bro., G. R. 
& W. H. Murphey, R. H. Barr, John Way- 
nan, E. Kahn. 

Grain, Hardware, Agricultural Im- 
plements, Drugs, Wood Work, etc.: — 
Davis Bros., W. W. Modlin, I. W. Pitman & 
.Son, Smith & Shirk, Nixon & Son, Mark. 



Davis, S. P. Jennings, Waldron & Maxin, 
Harvey & Davis Bros., Bouslog & Ice. 

Miscellaneous:— First National Bank, 
New Cattle Carriage Works, Charles P. Mur- 
phey, Jeweler; Kin>ey & Griffith, Marble 
Works; John M. Mo'wrer, harness, Hocck 
Bros., meals; Ernest Moore, musical merchan- 
dise; Huddleston & Son, photos; Hall & Son 
and L. W. & L. D. Needham, restaurants. 








KNIGHTSTOWN. 



The flourishing little city of Knights- 
town is situated on the banks of Blue 
river and National Road, on the line of 
the C, St. L. & P. R. R., and located in 
Wayne township, which is in the south 
west portion of Henry county. 

For the purpose of preserving some 
matters of interest, we give some im- 
portant items relating to 

ITS EARLY HISTORY. 

Previous to the laying out of the town 
a place known as "West Liberty had been 
started near here, but has since entirely 
faded away. Knightstown was first laid 
out in 1827. Among the early settlers 
we mention Mr. Waitsell, M. Cary, Dr. 
Whitesell, Mr. Marts, Mr. Sanford, Levi 
Stratton, Mr. Parker and M. F. Edwards. 
The first house was built by Mr. Cary in 
1827. Mr. James and Mr. Griffith es- 
tablished the first general store, Mr. Levi 
Stratton the first blacksmith shop, in 
1829. The first postmaster was Mr. Mays. 
The first newspaper was called The Indi- 
ana Sun, started in 1832, published by 



Grant & Mitchell. The first churcfc 
building erected was the Presbyterian, ins- 
1834, the society being formed the pre- 
vious year. The M. E. Church building 
was erected in 1837. Mr. Morris F. Ed- 
wards built the first carriage built in this 
county. Mr. Cary was the first hatter 
and started the first hotel. 

THE PRESENT 

Knightstown contains a population of" 
about 2,000 inhabitants, is situated in the 
midst of a fine agricultural section of the 
state and its busiuess houses embrace 
every branch incident to the require- 
ments, and enjoy a large and growing 
trade. It contains a flourishing Academy, 
woolen and flouring mills, and tile manu- 
factories. There are about one hundred 
business establishments of all descrip- 
tions. Three hotels, seven churches an«B 
fine public schools; one weekly paper, the 
Banner, is ably edited and published bj- 
Messrs. Deem & Brewington. The Den- 
tal News, a monthly, is published by Dr. 
T. P. Wagoner. 



ALLEN S. WHITE, 

Grocery, South Jefferson St. and 
West Side Public Square. 
Mr. White conducts two establishments in 
this line, one on South Jefferson St. and the 
other on the Public Square, each establish- 
ment being thoroughly stocked with the best 
grades of home supplies. The average stock 
carried amounts to 1'rom $3,000 to $5,000 and 
embraces everything in the line of staple and 
fancy groceries, provisions, seasonable pro- 
duce, confectioneries, canned goods, tobaccos 
cigars, notions, etc. The premises occupied 
on Jefferson St. comprise two floors 22^x50 
feet in dimensions, and everything about the 
-establishment indicates order and system and 



the most perfect business methods. His trade 
is gradually increasing and already extendi, 
throughout the city and distant adjoining: 
country districts, amounting to an average off* 
$:o,ooo annually. Three salesmen are re- 
quired to tend to the wants of patrons and thL- 
business will compare favorably with the inoit. 
flourishing grocery houses of this section df 
the state. Special' attention is given to securer 
the purest and best grades of family supplies 
and such as they can commend to their pi- 
trons. Mr. White was born in this state ir> 
1S4S, and his thorough knowledge of the re- 
quirements of the trade has secured for this 
house and its branch public confidence and 
increasing patronage. 



KNIGHTSTOWN. 



113 



'WILLIAMS & CARROLL, 

Dry Goods and Notions, Boots and 
Shoes, Clothing, arc., Northwest 
Cor. Main and Jefferson Sts. 
Among the leading mercantile pursuits the 
branches embraced in the stock carried by the 
-above firm embrace in the aggregated trans- 
.actlons a large capital and involve transactions 
which largely effect the convenience and pros- 
perity of all communities. The present firm 
was organized and established its present busi- 
ness, on the northwest corner of Main and 
_JefFerson Sts., in April, 1S82. The premises 
•occupied comprise a fine business room 20x1 15 
feet in size and basement, while the stock 
•embraces a full and general line of staple and 
fancy dry goods, foreign and American dress 
goods, of the newest patterns and styles, 
selected with direct reference to the require- 
ments of both city and country trade, carpets 
-and oil cloths, domestic goods, hosiery and 
.gloves, notions, etc; also a full stock of boots 
and shoes for men, women, boys, misses or 
children and hats and caps, while in the rear 
is a special department for ready made cloth- 
•ing for men or boys, trunks, valises, etc. The 
"individual members of the firm are E. Wil- 
liams and A. E. Carroll, both of whom give 
4heir personal attention to the business, be- 
sides giving employment to three assistants. 
The annual transactions will aggregate about 
$60,000, embracing both city and a large 
•country trade. Mr. E. Williams is a native of 
Indiana, born in Franklin County in 1S25. 
He first engaged in business at Charlottsville, 
Jnd, in 1849, coming to this city in 1S65. 
Here he was engaged in the general dry goods 
"trade under the firm name of Williams & 
Woods. About two years later Mr. Woods 
aretired, when the firm became Williams & 
Hatfield, and afterwards Williams, Hatfield & 
-Co., up to the time of forming the present 
business relations. During a period of about 
•eight years, up to the time of the change in 
»the institution, he held the position of 
Trustee of the Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' 
Home, near thiscitv. Mr. A. E. Carroll is a 
native of Greene County, O., born in 1S53, 
where he received his early education, first 
-engaging in business at Charlottsville, Ind. 
He came to this city in 1S7S, where he was 
one of the firm of Williams, Hatfield & Co., 
■being associated with the house up to "the 
.formation of the present firm. 



WATTS & PARKER, 

Manufacturers of Farm Drain Tile. 
The favorable location of Knightstown, both 
as regards the supply of material and field for 
trade, has made the enterprise carried on by 
the firm whose name heads this sketch one of 
the leading industries of this section. The en- 
terprise was founded in March, iSS3, and the 
-extent of their operations may be estimated 
■when we mention the fact that their products 
this season amount to $6,ooo. The clay best 
•adapted to their business is found here and the 



firm control six acres of ground. Two kilns, 
one 23x24 feet in dimensions and 12 feet in 
height, the other iqxiS feet in area and 12 feet 
high, are used for their purpose and three large 
drying sheds, the combined capacity of which 
is 50,000 fire inch tile. One engine, 20 horse 
power, is used, and a working force of ten 
men is the usual number employed. Thev 
consume 20 tons of coal per month and use 
about 300 cords of wood in the season of seven 
months, beginning with March. These works 
are the largest of the kind in the country. 

JAMES MILLS, 

Groceries, Provisions, etc., No. 77 
Main St. 

Among the business houses of Knightstown 
which have by the exercise of an honorable 
and reliable business policy achieved an envia- 
ble position among the business fraternity of 
their adopted city, more than a passing notice 
is due the establishment of Mr. Mills as a 
depot of home supplies. Mr. Mills has been 
identified with the mercantile growth of this 
city for a period of iS years, the last five of 
which were devoted to the grocery and pro- 
vision business. The premises occupied for 
business purposes embrace a commodious, well 
lighted and completely stocked salesroom 
20x150 feet in dimensions, inclusive of vard 
and storage room in rear, and two competent 
assistants divide with him the active duties of 
the established and growing trade. He gives 
special attention to securing the better* grades 
of goods and of such extent and variety as to 
suit all classes of purchasers. The trade of 
the house is local and gradually increasing. 
Mr. Mills is a native of Wales and was born 
in 1840. He emigrated to this country when 
quite young and came to Indiana 19 years ago 
and was express and railroad agent here for 
about 14 years. As an indication of the high 
esteem in which he is held by the community, 
it may be noticed that he is "at present repre- 
senting the First Ward of this city in the City 
Council, this being his fourth term. He en- 
listed in August, 1S62, in the 95th Ohio and 
was detailed as clerk for General Nelson's 
Chief-of-Staff officer, Mills Kendrick. 



WALLING & SON, 

Meat Market, Produce, etc., Wash- 
ington St. 
This old and reliable establishment was 
opened about 15 years ago by Corwin i Wal- 
ling. Upon the subsequent retirement of Mr. 
Corwin, Mr. Walling had exclusive control of 
the house until iSS2, when, upon the admit- 
tance of his son, G. A , into partnership, the 
firm became known by the present name of 
Walling & Son. Their present storeroom is 
26x26 feet in dimensions and is conveniently 
and attractively arranged. Their slaughter 
house is one of the best equipped in the state. 
Two assistants are employed and a steam en- 
gine and boiler are used in the manufacture of 
sausage and for dressing meats. They dispose 



114 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



of about 250 head of fat cattle and 150 head of 
sheep annually, and about 300 hogs are 
slaughtered during the cold season. Sir. O. 
A. Walling conducts jointly with another a 
farm of 100 acres, owned by Mr. Walling him- 
self and lying near the city. Both the senior 
and junior members of the firm are natives of 
Ohio. The former was born in 1S31, the lat- 
ter in 1S5S. 

WILKINSON & PEDEN, 

Commission Merchants and Dealers 
in Grain, Seeds, Flour and Produce, 
South Jefferson St., near Depot. 
Among Knightstown's manufacturing and 
commercial concerns, there are none occupy- 
ing a higher position than the firm whose 
name heads this editorial.. This firm have 
had control of the Eagle Mills since April, 
iSSo, having at that time succeeded the firm 
of White & Corbin. Their mill, favorably 
a conveniently located on the Blue River, 
one-half mile north of town, was erected about 
40 years ago by Ebenezer Goble. The water 
supply is ample during the entire year, two 
turbine wheels 48 inches in diametar being 
kept in constant use. They furnish all the 
motive power required to propel three run of 
stone. Flour is made here by the new process 
and it meets with a ready sale in this imme- 
diate vicinity. The flour is of the finest qual- 
ity and the capacity of the mill is about 30 
barrels in 24 hours. A working force of three 
hands is employed in the mill and both cus- 
tom and merchant work is done. This, how- 
ever, is but a diminutive part of the business 
carried on by this firm. They conduct exten- 
sive operations in grain and stock, having 
pursued this department of their business here 
for a period of 12 years. They handle about 
250,000 bushels of grain annually and their 
6tock transactions for 1SS2 amounted to not 
less than $200,000. They have a storage 
capacity for about 40,000 bushels of grain. In 
addition to this the firm is associated with 
grain operators at other points. Their trans- 
actions in this connection are not included in 
the amount given above. E. N. and T. B. 
Wilkinson and Reuben Peden are the indi- 
vidual members of the firm. They are old 
residents of this state and are widely and 
favorably known throughout this section. 

A. O. MORRIS, 

The Cash Grocer, No. 7S Main St. 
Among the mercantile pursuits of the thriv- 
ing city of Knightstown, none are more de- 
serving of mention than the establishment at 
the above location, owned and controlled by 
the gentleman whose name appears at the 
head of this editorial. Mr. Morris has pur- 
sued the grocery and provision business with 
a more than ordinary decree of success for a 
period of 14 years. During eight years of 
this time he conducted the business on his 
own account, the remaining six being occupied 
in partnership business. His salesroom is 



25x100 feet in dimensions and is filled to re- 
pletion with as fine a stock of groceries and 
provisions as any to be found in this section. 
He employs three salesmen and his annual 
business will amount to upwards of $40,00©- 
The house is one of the best known in the- 
county. It is recognized as the leading gro- 
cery house of this section. Mr. Morris is a. 
native of Indiana and was born in 1S51. 

FORBES & APPLEGATE, 
Lumber Manufacturers. 
The firm of Forbes & Applegate, who, as 
extensive manufacturers and dealers in this- 
line, are entitled to favorable consideration in 
these pages. This business was founded in 
1SS1 under the firm name of Forbes, Apple- 
gate & Co., but one year later a disastrous 
boiler explosion destroyed their mill, after 
which the company withdrew, leaving the 
business in the hand's of the present managers- 
The mill was at once rebuilt and is now one 
of the best and most thoroughly equipped 
mills in the state. A 40 horse power engine 
supplies the motive power, and the capacity is 
i6,oco feet of lumber per day. Their weekly 
turn out of lumber is about* 24,000 feet. The 
mill covers a ground area of 50XS0 feet, anaS 
about three acres of adjoining ground is used 
for yard and storage purposes. The firmi 
makes a leading specialty of turning out fine 
lumber for finishing work, such as ash, cherry,, 
walnut, hickory, etc. This class of lumber m 
sawed in such a way as to leave the natunS 
grain of the wood as little impaired as possi- 
ble, that it may show the finest possible finish 
when oiled. Their hickory is shipped princi- 
pally to wagon works and* is used for axle-s, 
etc. Large shipments of ash lumber are 
made to manufacturers of agricultural imple- 
ments, this being the best wood in the market 
for that purpose. Their fine cherry, quarter- 
sawed oak and walnut lumber is shipped in 
large quantities to Dayton, O., and other East- 
ern markets. Robert' M. Forbes and Elijuih 
Applegate are the individual members of tftie 
firm. Mr. Forbes is a native of North Caras- 
lina, but came West when a boy and is an did 
resident ot this state. Mr. Applegate is .a 
native of Ohio, but has resided in this statte 
during the greater part of his life. The busi- 
ness standing and general reputation of tibte 
firm, as well as the honorable business methods 
in which the business is conducted, entitles Bt 
to the esteem and consideration of the com- 
munity. 



T. HOOVER, 

Harness Manufacturer, Main St. 
This enterprising gentleman began business 
as a manufacturer of and dealer in harness iin 
Knightstown about 3oyears ago, and with the 
exception of an interval of about six years, 
has pursued the business ever since. lie i+- a 
practical harness maker and can guarantiee 
satisfaction in every particular. He occupies 
a building 23^x40 feet in dimensions, and 'an. 



KNIGHTSTOWN. 



115- 



addition to his personal attention, which is 
devoted exclusively to this business, he em- 
ploys an average of from one to two assist- 
ants. He is prepared to manufacture double 
carriage harness at from $30 to $75 per set, 
single light harness at from $15 to $50, and 
double work harness at from $22 to $44. 
Every article is of uniform reliability, elegant 
finish and substantial. Mr. Hoover is a native 
of Maryland and was born in 1S2S. He has 
resided in Indiana since 1S49 and has built up 
a nourishing and lucrative trade, enjoying as 
he does to-day a deservedly high standing in 
trade circles. 



R. E. OVERMAN, 

Pianos and Organs, Sewing Ma- 
chines, etc., South Jefferson St. 
Mr. Overman established this house three 
years ago and has succeeded, in that brief 
time, in building up an extensive trade. He 
keeps in stock a variety of organs that can not 
be excelled in this section. The Ithica, N. 
Y., organ, the Mason & Hamlin organ and 
the Chase Organ Company's organs are han- 
dled. These organs have obtained a reputa- 
tion with regard to tone and wokmanship that 
places them in the front rank among all or- 
gans known to the trade. He handles pianos 
in the interest of Theo. Pfafflin & Co., the 
leading piano house of Indianapolis. The 
ample facilities enjoyed by Mr. Overman 
enables him to offer special inducements. His 
trade in sewing machines is quite large. He 
handles the Domestic and New Home ma- 
chines. He makes a leading specialty of the 
old favorite Domestic, however. His trade 
extends through this and part of the adjoining 
counties of Rush and Hancock. Fixtures and 
repair work receive prompt attention. Mr. 
Overman was born in this state in 1S52. His 
straightforward business methods have secured 
him the confidence of the community. 

I. C DOVEY, 

Wall Paper, Pictures, etc., Main St. 
The house conducted by the gentleman 
whose name heads this editorial is the leading 
one of its class in this section. It was opened 
21 years ago by Dovey & Bro., and did not 
fall into the exclusive management of the pres- 
ent proprietor until 1SS2. Mr. Dovey now 
occupies an establishment 22xSo feet in di- 
mensions, with basement, and carries a well 
selected stock of wall paper, pictures and pic- 
ture frames, paints, oils, window glass and 
shades, lamps and chandeliers, etc.; in fact, 
this is the only establishment of the kind in 
the city and the only one in this section in 
which so large a line of valuable notions are 
kept. His trade is local, but lucrative and sat- 
isfactory, and shows signs of a rapid and per- 
manent* increase. Mr. Dovey is a native of 
England. He emigrated to America in his 
boyhood and has been identified with the 
growth and prosperity of this section ever 
since the establishment of his business here. 



JOHN HEATON, 

Manufacturer of Furniture ani> 
Proprietor of Saw and Planing- 

Mill. 
Mr. John Heaton, wfto is engaged in the 
saw and planing mill business and the manu- 
facture of furniture with a success that enti- 
tles him to recognition in this work, was for- 
merly engaged in the flour milling bus'r.-ss- 
with saw mill attached on the outside of the 
city. About 12 years ago he moved his s_w 
mill to its present location in the citv, and 
since that time has devoted himself to the 
manufacture of furniture and the management: 
ofhissawand planing mills. With a thor- 
ough knowledge of his business and a deter- 
mination to succeed, he has increased his- 
operations to a considerable extent since that 
time. He has ample facilities for the manu- 
facture of furniture and lumber of the com- 
mon grades, and employs a force of about :z 
hands in the different departments of his busi- 
ness. His mill has a capacfty of 7,00c feet of 
lumber per day, but the local demand does 
not require the entire productive capacitv. A 
60 horse power engine supplies the motive 
power, and the entire establishment is equirred 
with machinery of improved patern. K:s 
furniture warerooms are on Main St., west of 
the Culbertson Block, where he is prepared to 
sell parlor, bedroom and kitchen furniture of 
reliable make and elegant pattern at prices 
within the reach of all classes of purchasers. 
Mr. Heaton is in fact prepared to offer sub- 
stantial advantages to the trade. 



JOHN WEAVER, 

Dealer in Watches, Clocks, Jew- 
elry, Silverware and Drugs. 

This is the oldest and best known establish- 
ment of its kind in the city, having beer* 
founded by its present proprietor in iS^2. 
Mr. Weaver in his early days was a practicin ~ 
physician of high standing in the profession, 
having studied under tne celebrated Dr. 
Christopher Espich, of Germantown, O. Mr. 
Weaver was born in Montgomery Countr, O.. 
December 10th, 1S19. In 1S42 he took up his 
residence here, and in addition to the pursuit 
of his profession, he opened a drug store, in 
which business he has been engaged to 2 
greater or less extent ever since. Shortlv 
after the last named date Mr. Weaver found 
himself drifting into the jewelry business, al- 
though he still continues the drug business, 
reluctantly, however, because he is unab:e to- 
give it the attention it should have, but car- 
ries it on merely as an outside comrr.oditv 
that can not well be dispensed with. His 
jewelry establishment will compare favoral It 
with our metropolitan houses. The stock 
comprises a valuabte assortment of jeweirv. 
foreign and domestic watches, solid andp'.t:rd 
silverware, diamonds, clocks, table silverware, 
etc. He is ably assisted by his son, F. E. 
Weaver, who is a practical watchmaker and 
jeweler. Repairing in all its departments re- 
ceives prompt and satisfactory attention. 



116 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



l^ M. CULBERTSON, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 
Hardware and Agricultural Imple- 
ments, CULBER/TSON BLOCK, MAIN St. 

This being one of the mercantile houses that 
liave grown to magnificent proportions from 
-small beginnings, we take special pride in pre- 
senting to the readers of this volume a brief 
history of its career and present standing. Mr. 
•Culbertson has pursued the business in which 
we find him engaged for a period of 12 years. 
His trade increased in such a manner that 
more commodious apartments were required. 
This want was supplied by the erection of the 
magnificent block known as the Culbertson 
Block, two years ago. Here he occupies two 
floors 60x62 feet in dimensions, with elevator 
•connecting all floors, the interior being hand- 
somely finished in black walnut. It is the best 
•fitted tip salesroom in the city and his stock is 
large and complete, the entire establishment 
presenting a metropolitan appearance. In ad- 
dition to his large stock of general hardware, 
Mr. Culbertson keeps in stock all the new 
And improved lines of agricultural implements 
adapted to this section, together with a full line 
■of stoves and tinware. He also deals largely 
in wagons, buggies, pumps, etc. His trade is 
both wholesale and retail. His stock altogether 
■will aggregate from $20,000 to $30,000. Mr. 
Culbertson is a native of this state and is one 
of our representative and reliable business 
men. 



H. H. CONDIT, 

Dry Goods, Boots and Shoes, etc., 72 
Main St. 

In a work setting forth the industries and 
Advantages of the prosperous city of Knights- 
town, the house conducted by Mr. H. H. Con- 
■dit, at No. 72 Main St., being one of the most 
popular dry goods emporiums of this section, 
is worthy of more than a passing notice. The 
house was opened bv Mr. M. Heller as a 
•clothing store in 1S63. He, however, was 
succeeded by the firm of Weil Bros., who con- 
trolled the "house until August, 1SS3, when 
the business fell into the hands of the present 
proprietor. Mr. Condit occupies a commo- 
dious salesroom 22^x100 feet in dimensions, 
the building being a substantial three story 
"brick block. His stock of dry goods, boots, 
shoes, etc-, includes every desirable article that 
can be enumerated in connection with those 
special lines of goods. His storeroom is well 
lighted, his goods conveniently and tastefully 
arranged, and with the assistance of three effi- 
cient salesmen, he is prepared to give prompt 
attention to the wants of his many patrons. 
Being judicious and experienced in the selec- 
tion of goods, the public need not fear that 
goods of an inferior nature will be shown them 
in Mr. Condit's establishment, and we take 
pride in recommending his house to the con- 
sideration of our readers. Mr. Condit is an 
energetic and progressive merchant and was 
•engaged in business in Indianapolis for 



some years previous to the time of his engag- 
ing in his present enterprise. 



WHITE HEATON, 

Agricultural Implements and Farm 
Machinery. 

Mr. Heaton begai: this business five years 
ago and his establishment has become one of 
the permanent and successful business houses 
of Knightstown. He occupies premises 50x70 
feet in dimensions and carries a heavy stock, 
making a specialty of heavy farm machinery. 
He has the agency for Deering's Self- Binder, 
made at Chicago. This binder is one of the 
best in the market; it is durable, light running 
and does rapid and satisfactory work. He 
handles the Nichols & Shepherds Vibrator 
and Thresher, always satistactory wherever 
U6ed; Winchester wagons, plows, harrows, 
cultivators, pumps, etc. This is the only house 
here devoted exclusively to the handling of 
agricultural- machinery, and its trade extends 
throughout this and adjoining counties. Mr. 
Heaton is a native of this state and was born 
in 1S37. He is fully conversant with every 
detail of his business, and farmers or others 
having dealings with him will invariably meet 
with fair and honorable treatment. 



VALLEY HOUSE, 

George W. Stevenson, Proprietor. 
This hotel building is a substantial two 
story brick structure 50x70 feet in dimensions 
and contains 30 rooms. It was erected in 1871 
by Joseph Woods (now deceased), a man of 
considerable wealth and influence in this sec- 
tion. The present proprietor assumed con- 
trol in 1S79, and, ably assisted by his wife, who 
spares no efforts to make every guest feel that 
the Valley House can supply him with home 
comforts, he has been eminently successful in 
his enterprise. The hotel is in close prox- 
imity to the railroad depot and can con- 
veniently accommodate 40 guests. The rooms 
are all tastefully and comfortably furnished. 
The table will always be found abundantly 
supplied with the best substantialsand choicest 
delicacies to be found in the market here. 
The terms for transient guests are only $1.50 
per day. The Valley House is well worthy 
of the large public patronage that it is receiv- 
ing. Mr. Stevenson, who has resided here for 
nearly half a century, is well and favorably 
known to the traveling public. 



SOL. HITTLE, 

Confectionery and Bakery, Main 

St., Cor. Washington. 
Mr. Hittle has been established in this busi- 
ness here since 1S62 and has succeeded in 
building up a profitable trade. The premises 
occupied are 20x50 feet in dimensions, besides 
the bakery department, consisting of one floor 
and basement. A nicely fitted up lunchroom 
is attached and the most palatable articles in 
this line are served to the public in an ap- 
proved manner. Oysters and ice cream served 
in their seasons. He uses 24 barrels of flour 



KNIGHTSTOWN. 



117 



monthly and his stock of bread, biscuits, etc., 
always fresh and pure, is the finest to be had 
in this market. His stock of confectioneries 
is complete in every particular, and all the 
delicacies in this line may be had at Mr. Hit- 
tie's at reasonable and satisfactory prices. 
Three hands are employed, and promptness, 
courtesy and reliability are predominant char- 
acteristics of the business transactions of the 
house. Mr. Hittle was born in Pennsylvania 
in 1831 but has resided in thi6 city since 1852. 

BAER & SWAIM, 

Groceries, Queensware, etc., No. 62 

Main St. 
Among the most prominent business houses 
of this city and in a leading position among 
the list of grocers, is the enterprising firm 
known by the caption title above. The house 
was founded by Jesse Swaim (father of the 
junior member of the present firm) and a Mr. 
Hittle, under the firm name of Swaim & Hit- 
tie. This firm continued the business for 
three years, when, upon the retirement of Mr. 
Hittle, Mr. Swaim became the sole proprietor, 
continuing in that capacity until 1878, when 
the business was purchased by his son, Edwin 
M. Swaim, and Henry C. Baer, and since that 
date the house has been recognized by its 
present name and style. They occupy a fine 
salesroom at the location named above and 
carry a full line of every desirable commodity 
known to the trade. Their trade is quite large. 
Mr. Baer is a native of Dayton, O. Mr. 
Swaim was born in this city on the premises 
now occupied by the firm in 1S59. They are 
reliable in all transactions and fully deserve 
the confidence and esteem of the community 
in which they live. 



G. S. & J. W. LOWERY, 

(Successors to G. S. & T. M. Lowery), 
Stock Shipping and Dealers in 
Stock. 
These enterprising gentlemen have pursued 
the business in which they are so extensively 
engaged for a period of iS years. In addition 
to this, these gentlemen carry on a prosperous 
meat market in this city. The firm buy up 
and ship an average of 500 head of fat cattle 
annually, mostly to Richmond, Cincinnati and 
Eastern packing houses. Their annual ship- 
ment of hogs will average 2,000 head. This 
average, kept up for a period of iS years, as it 
has been, makes their business one of large 
proportions, and this work would he very in- 
complete it' it did not make favorable mention 
of a firm that has done so much toward pros- 
pering the agricultural industries of this sec- 
tion by affording to farmers a market for their 
live stock. The senior member of the firm, 
Mr. G. S. Lowery, is a native of North Caro- 
lina and was born in 1827. He has resided in 
this state for a period of 51 years, and is there- 
lore an esteemed and honored pioneer. The 
firm is in every way worthy of the respect and 
confidence of "the public. 



HARRY WATTS, 

Slate and Metal Roofing and 
Dealer in Granite and Marble, 
Socth Jefferson St. 
Mr Watts has been engaged in business pur- 
suits for more than 20 years and has pursued 
his present enterprise since 1867. In addition 
to the business named above, he is extensively 
engaged in the manufacture of drain tile, under 
the firm name of Watts i: Parker. An edi- 
torial notice of this firm will be found else- 
where in this volume. In the line of slate and 
metal roofing, Mr. Watts controls a lar^e 
patronage and satisfaction is always guaran- 
teed. His fine granite and marble monumen- 
tal work and building stone work is an im- 
portant feature of his business. His trade 
extends throughout Henry and adjoining 
counties and is lucrative and'satisfactorv. All 
work turned out by Mr. Watts is noted for its 
superior workmanship, elegant finish and other 
commendable features. He utilizes two build- 
ings, each 20x40 feet in dimensions, and em- 
ploys a working force of seven men in the 
various departments of his business. Mr. 
Watts is a native of England, but is an old 
resident of this place. He is possessed of good 
business attainments and is one of our solid 
and influential business men. 



J. A. PIKE, 

Planing Mill. 
Mr Pike carries a stock valued at about 
$S,ooo, and this is constantly being replen- 
ished to meet the requisite demands of trade. 
The stock includes dressed and undressed 
lumber, door frames, sash, mouldings, floor- 
ing, siding, etc.; in short, he is prepared to 
supply builders with all necessary material on 
short notice. He is also prepared to take con- 
tracts lor the construction of buildings, and 
manufactures furniture to a limited extent. 
The building utilized for his business is two 
stories in height and 50x70 feet in dimensions. 
It is supplied with the latest improvements in 
the way of machinery, and a 36 horse power 
engine supplies the motive power. A work- 
ing force of 15 hands is kept in constant em- 
ploy. His trade compares favorably with that 
of any similar establishment in this section 
and his annual business will amount to from 
$20,000 to $30,000. Mr. Pike is a native of 
Indiana and was born in 1S49. Energv, enter- 
prise and business ability are to be found among 
his predominant personal characteristics, and 
parties having business relations with him 
will invariably meet with fair and honorable 
treatment. 



HI ATT BROS., 

Fine Stock: Breeders; Livery, Feed 

and Sale Stable. 

This business was founded bv Scot: & 

Cooper, who were succeeded by the following 

firms in the order in which thev are named: 

Scott & Thayer, John Snyder, Gregg & 



118 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



Barnes, Bennett & Gregg and Earrett & 
Barnes. Alter this it remained vacant for 
more than a year, when it was again opened 
and conducted for a short period by two or 
three different owners, after which Mr. Newt. 
Robinson took it in charge, but he, after a 
short business career, was succeeded by D. 
W. Thayer, one of the former and most suc- 
cessful owners. Mr. Thayer was succeeded 
by the present firm in April, 1SS2. This firm 
is composed of three brothers, Clarkson, 
William and Samuel lliatt, and underjtheir 
able management a large and profitablefbusi- 
ness is done. Their great specialty is the 
handling of three blooded stallions, which 
they stand for mares, this giving them 
all " that they can do during the foal- 
ing season. Their stallions are recognized 
as among the best bred horses in the state. 
One of them is imported and is of the cele- 
brated Clydesdale stock, another is from the 
Morgan and Paddy stock, and their fine trol- 
ting stalion has taken 31 premiums out of 33 
exhibits at fairs. " Tattler Boy " is a 
beautiful bay, six years old, weighs 1,400 
pounds, symmetrically formed, kgs hand- 
somely tipped with black. His whole appear- 
ance shows blood of the purest type, with 
every mark of speed and endurance. His 
career in the ring of stock shows, though 
short, is brilliant. This horse conies from a 
long line of famous horses: He was sired by 
"Tattler Chief," (who in the fall of 1875, after 
a season of So mares and only four weeks 
Handling, trotted three heats at Cynthiana, 
Ky., below 2.40), he by Alexander's "Tattler," 
(who trotted in 2.26 and was sold by Mr. 
Alexander for $17,500), he by Alexander's 
"Pilot," dam "Telltale" by "Telamon," he by 
"Modcc,'" second dam "Flea" by "Modoc," 
third dam "Martha Darneal" by "Sumpter,' 1 
foi|rth dam "Arminda" by "Doublehead," fifth 
dam "Dux" by "Imp. Buzzard," sixth dam by 
"Columbus;" "Tattler Chiefs" dam by"Mem- 
b'rino Chief," second dam by Barkley's "Co- 
lumbus," out of a "Messenger" mare, third 
dam bv second "Duke of Bedford," fourth 



dam by "Matchless," he by "Imp. Narragan- 
sett;" his half brother trotted his mile in 2.25, 
Mr. Alexander refused $15,000 for him. 
"Tattler Boy's" dam was sired by "Yellow- 
Jacket," he by old "Yellow Jacket," he by 
Blackburn's "Whip," he by "Imp. Whip," out 
of "Speckle Back" by "Cefer." Thus we have 
blended in "Tattler Boy" the blood ot 
three of the grandest types of Kentucky's 
famous horses. From "Tattler," "Pilot" and 
others he inherits the strength and lever 
power that marks Jthe trotter. From "Mes- 
senger," "Matchless" and others he inherits 
nerve and ambition, coupled with power of 
endurance — points require for the race 
course. While from "Yellow Jacket," the 
acknowledged saddle stallion of Kentucky, he 
inherits the graceful movement and intelli- 
gence that go so far to make up the perfect 
saddle horse. 

No special efforts are made to carry on a 
livery or feed business, but six or eight first 
class roadsters are kept for that purpose, and 
when necessary, 40 head of horses can be ac- 
commodated in their stables. After the sea- 
son for brood mares is over, the firm devote 
their attention to the buying and selling of 
horses, in which line they do an extensive and" 
lucrative business. The members of the firm 
are natives of this state and are gentlemen of 
enterprise in their business pursuits. 



Following are the other more important 
firms doing business: 

Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots, Shoes, 
Hardware, Stoves, Dkugs, Books and 
Furniture: — Williams & Hatfield, Burt 
Harris, J. T. Furgason, Haufler & McMurnev, 
C. S. Hubbard, E. S. Ball & Co., Bell & Co., 
Breckenridge & Co., C. I. Lemmon, E. B. 
Niles, Pickering & Patterson, W. M. Ed- 
wards, J. M. Power, N. B. Wade, D. L. Heri- 
tage, Peter Watts, planing mill ; Shipman 
Hotel, W. S. Weaver, jeweler; Addison & 
White, bakery; D. W. Thaver, buggies; W. 
H. Harden, harness; J. W. Loury and Walling 
& Burke Bros., meats. 



MIDDLETOWN. 



This pleasantly situated village, situated 
in Fall Creek Township, Henry County, 
is located on Fall Creek and on the line 
of the P., C. & St. L. Ry\ 12 miles north- 
west of Xew Castle, the county seat. 

The town was originally laid out by 
Mr. Jacob Koontz, and town lots sold on 
the Public Square December 25, 1829. 
Among the first settlers of this township 
may be mentioned, 1828, John Hart, 
Chas. Williams, David Davis, Thomas 
Gardner, Abraham Thomas and Solomon 
Bowers. In 1830 Nathan Ripley and 
Nathan Biut settled in Middletown. A 
tanner and currier was among the first 
business started here by Mr. Burr. The 
first store was started in 1831 by Jacob 
Koontz and another by Joshua Willet. 
The first wagon shop by James Hamilton, 
in 1833. The first house built in the town 
was by Elias Parker, in 1830. There 
were thirty votes polled at the election 



for Fall Creek Township in August, 1830. 
As an indication of the growth of this 
place we give a glance at 

THE PRESENT MIDDLETOWN, 

which now contains nearly 1,000 inhabi- 
tants, and many fine business buildings 
and private residences. There are three 
dry goods stores; 4 grocers; 2 drug-?' res; 
2 restaurants; 3 millinery houses; 1 fur- 
niture store, undertaking establishment; 
2 wagon and carriage shops; 2shoe shops; 
1 merchant tailor; 2 barber shops; 1 nrst- 
class hotel — the Tykle House; 1 lodge of 
F. and A. M.; 1 lodge of I. O. O. F.; 1 
post G. A. R.; a good graded school; 1 
M. E. Church; 1 Christian Church and 1 
U. B. Church; a flouring mill; 2 saw mills; 
express and telegraph offices. The Tykle 
Block is one which would be a credit to 
any city. We are indebted to Capt. Ty kle's 
kindness and to Mr. C. H. Burr for much 
of the information furnished of this place. 



BRUNK £ BRATTAIX, 

Groceries, Qceensware and Meat 

Market, Main St. 
The efforts put forth by these gentlemen in 
selecting and handling only No. i goods, in a 
fair and honorable way, are appreciated by the 
public and they receive a large and lucrative 
patronage as a necessary consequence. The 
house was oponed 10 years ago as a meat 
market by Mr. Brunk," of the existing firm. 
Three years ago the grocery department was 
added and in August. 1SS3, Mr. Brattain was 
admitted into the firm. These gentlemen 
now occupy a salesroom 20x60 feet in dimen- 
sions, to which is connected a rear wareroom 
and a cellar for the storage of their stock. 
These rooms are located in a two story brick 
block on Main St. Their stock is complete in 
every particular and includes all articles 
enumerated under the head of staple and fancy 
groceries, provisions, seasonable produce, 
queensware, gia-sware, etc. Their trade in 
meats is a prominent item of their business, 
which can be easily inferred from the fact that 
they handle about 100 beeves annually and 
other small stock in proportion. They employ 
"a competent assistant and pay prompt and 
courteous attention to the wants of tiieir 
patrons. They sell for cash and therefore are. 
enabled and do sell at low but uniform pricesi 
Mr. Brunk is a native of Henry County and 
has always resided here. Mr. Brattain was 
born in "Hamilton County, Ind., and came to 
Middletown in 1^63. He rendered his coun- 
try efficient service during the war of the 



rebellion by serving over three years in :he 
service. He enlisted in the 34th Indiana Vol- 
unteer Infantry and afterwards re-enlisted in 
the same company and regiment. He was 
honorably discharged in 1S66. The fir:r. is a 
representative one in every particular a::d well 
worthy of public patronage. 

HOLLOWELL & MOWREY, 
Meat Markkt, Main* St. 
These gentlemen control one of the best 
meat markets in the county and being ener- 
getic, reliable and thoroughly eonver.-ant ■••• ith 
their business, they have succeeded in building 
up a splendid trade. The busine>s was L~:ab- 
lished in October, 1SS2, by Holloweli & Rea- 
son. Three months later Mr. Reason was 
succeeded by Mr. Mowrey and the fir:':-, has 
since been known by its present nan e and 
style. They handle an average of ab :: 10 
beeves per month and dispose of small 5t >ck 
in proportion. Their salesroom is 20X 
including a fine cooling room and a!', the im- 
provements and conveniences requisite. Their 
meats will always be found pure and fres id 
their prices uniform and. satisfactory. Mr. J. 
H. Holloweli is a native of Monts 
County, Pa., and emigrated to Indiana in 1S66. 
He first settled at Pendleton, Madis <:-. O . ty, 
but has resided in Middletown since the estab- 
lishment of his present business at the date 
above named. Mr. C. E. Mq^rrtM is a native 
of Madison County, this st.te, but has resided 
in Middletown since November, io>:. This is 



120 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



CAPTAIN FRED. TVKLE, 

Furniture and Undertaking, Main St. 
Among those men who have contributed 
largely to the growth and development of 
Middletown, the gentleman whose name heads 
this sketch occupies a prominent position. 
Captain Tykle came to Middletown from Pre- 
ble County, O., about 30 years ago and has 
been engaged in business pursuits here during 
that entire interval. He brought with him a 
stock of dry goods, which he retailed, and then 
engaging in the furniture business, we find 
him pursuing it more or less constantly ever 
since. He is now the only furniture dealer in 
the town. He owns a fine hearse and is pre- 
pared to give p:ompt attention to undertaking 
in all its department^. His stock of fine fur- 
niture, caskets, etc., is valued at about $2,500. 
As intimated in the beginning of our sketch, 
Mr. Tykle has always been identified with the 
material interests of the city of his adoption, 
and although he began with a small capital, 
he now owns the finest residence, the finest 
business block and about half of the business 
part of the town. His military career has been 
brilliant and is worthy of especial mention. 
He was a participant in the war against Mexi- 
co and took an active part in the heated engage- 
ments that occurred about the city of Mexico. 
just previous to the capture of that city, his 
regiment being the 4th U. 8. Infantry. Dur- 
ing the late war he rendered the nation effi- 
cient service by raising two companies to 
assist in putting down the rebellion. He is 
held in the highest esteem by his fellow citi- 
zens and served as a member o( the first board 
of township trustees. In his bu>iness trans- 
actions he is invariably found to be prompt, 
decisive and reliable. 



W. H. CUMMINS, 

Hardware, Stoves, etc., Main St. 
This house was founded 12 years ago by J. 
A. Scott. Mr. Scott was succeeded by George 
Sanders, Mr. Sanders by Griffis <& Swope, 
these gentlemen by Griffis & Mixon, and the 
last named firm by the present proprietor in 
March, 1SS1. Mr. Cummins carries a com- 
plete stock, and although he occupies the 
field \wthout a competitor, his prices and terms 
are always reasonable and satisfactory. His 
stock fills two rooms at his place of business 
on Main St., each of which is 20x60 feec. He 
also utilizes a warehouse for the storage of 
agricultural implements. Among the special- 
ties in the line of improved agricultural im- 
plements found in stock are Furst & Bradley's 
wheat drill, Hamilton, Imperial, South Bend, 
Weir and Limestone plows, Weir sulky plows, 
Tiger rake, Champion rake, Brown corn 
planter, etc. His stock of shelf and other 
hardware, cooking, parlor and heating stoves, 
nails, sash, etc., is full and complete, and the 
entire establishment presents a metropolitan 
appearance. His goods are selected especially 
for this market, and being so thoroughly con- 
versant with every detail and department of 
his business, no goods of an inferior nature 



find a place in stock. Mr. Cummins is a native 
of Henry County and was engaged in agricul- 
tural pursuits up to the time of entering upon 
his present business. 



MIDDLETOWN MILLS, 

J. C. Daniels, Proprietor. 
In setting forth the various industries that 
contribute so largely to the agricultural and 
commercial wealth of a state, we find the mill- 
ing interests occupying a leading position, 
both with regard to the amount of capital and 
labor employed and the relations they sustain 
to the farmer by furnishing markets for the 
products of his fields. We find Mr. John C. 
Daniels, the proprietor of the above named 
mills, deservedly occupying a prominent posi- 
tion in this important industry. His 20 years 
experience in the business, and giving it his 
entire attention and personal supervision, to- 
gether with the latest improved machinery 
and the utilization of the new process, enables 
him to furnish as good flour as any miller in 
this section of the country. He is also pre- 
pared to pay the highest market price in cash 
for good wheat. The mills of which we write 
were erected by John Swope and are 4SX33 feet 
in dimensions and three an : one-half stories in 
height. Mr. Swope was succeeded by the firm 
of Painter & Cotfman, who controlled the 
business until 1S7S, when they in their turn 
were succeeded by the present proprietor. 
Mr. Daniels is prepared to do both merchant 
and custom work. A 50 horse power engine 
supplies the motive power. Three competent 
employes find constant work in the establish- 
ment, and the trade of the mills is rapidly in- 
creasing. Mr. Daniels is a native of Indiana 
and is a gentleman of recognized business 
ability, well qualified by long and practical 
experience for the position he occupies. 

HONEY CREEK MILLS, 
Joseph Fry, Proprietor. 
These mills are 40x30 feet in dimensions, 
four stories in height and are adapted to both 
steam and water power. The engine is of 25 
horse power and the water wheel is one of 
James Laffel's celebrated Turbines. The mill 
was erected in 1S45 by Eli Cay lor. Some 
time thereafter Mr. Samuel Fry, father of the* 
present proprietor, became the owner. Mr. 
Joseph Fry has held possession since 1871. 
In 1S79 the mills were remodeled, improved 
and enlarged and two run of stone were added. 
The mill is ecpaipped with all the modern im- 
provements essential to the manufacture of 
fine flour and feed and the new process was 
recently introduced. The capacity of the mill 
is about 40 barrels of flour in 24 hours, and 
first class work in every particular is fully 
guaranteed. Mr. Fry is a practical miller of 
litelong experience, his father having been in 
charge of the Honey Creek Mills for a period 
of 26 years. Its trade is located over a wide 
range of territory and is gradually and perma- 
nently increasing, as a consequence of the liber- 
al and reliable business policy pursued. 



Delaware Comity. 



Delaware County, Indiana, is situated 
in the central portion of the state from 
north to south, and within one tier of 
counties from its eastern boundary. It 
is surrounded by the counties of Henry, 
Madison, Hancock, Grant, Blackford, Jay, 
and Randolph, each of which forms part 
of its boundary line. It has an area of 
255,360 acres; almost all of which is, or 
can readily be made subservient to agri- 
cultural purposes. In fact there is proba- 
bly no other equal area in the state which 
contains so little waste land. The popu- 
lation of the county now numbers nearly 
25,000 souls — for the most part an intelli- 
gent, well read, well-to-do class of farmers, 
a fact that is borne out by a brief exami- 
nation o£ the school statistics of the 
county as to the attendance, and grade of 
its pupils, and the class of school build- 
ings erected throughout the different 
townships. The county is well watered; 
the principal streams being the White 
and Mississinewa Rivers, with their tribu- 
taries, which afford abundant facilities 
for the most perfect drainage of the low 
lands, and in many localities abundant 
water-power for milling and manufactur- 
ing purposes. There are to be found 
within the limits of Delaware County no 
less than eighty-one varieties of shrubs, 
and timber of heavier growth; of the 
latter there is still an abundance suited 
to the wants of the manufacturer and 
builder. Among these we may mention 
as the most prominent, the various kinds 
of oak, ash, elm, poplar, beech, hickory, 
walnut, maple, and linden. The oak land, 
however, is the most extensive; the next 



in order being ash, beech, hickory, and 
maple; and though there is yet much to 
be found in some portions of the comity, 
it is fair to say that black walnut is 
growing scarce. It may be said, however, 
that outside of the prairie lands, which 
comprise about one-twentieth of the total 
acreage, Delaware County is not only 
well timbered, but with those varieties 
that are especially valuable. 

As to value of its lands for agricultur- 
al purposes they are unsurpassed; and we 
venture to say that there is no section of 
country in the United States or territories 
to-day which offers better inducements 
for either the farmer or the manufacturer 
to locate than does Delaware County, 
either in the prospective rise in values, 
present prices of lands, its timber supply, 
it agricultural richness, its markets, and 
over and above all, its railroad facilities. 

The county has an excellent and ex- 
tended system of gravel roads which radi- 
ate from Muncie, the county seat, like 
the spokes of a wheel, to every part of the 
county; making inter-communication not 
only complete, but pleasant and practi- 
cable even during the worst season of the 
year. The importance of these to the 
general trade can hardly be over esti- 
mated, making easy communication by 
teams to all parts of the county, and even 
adjoining counties complete. Together 
with some thirty miles of free roads they 
form in all a grand total of one hundred 
and forty-five miles of graveled turnpike 
in the county, built at au average cost of 
§2,000 per mile, or an aggregate of 
8290,000. 



CITY OF. MUNCIE, 



Muncie, the county seat of Delaware 
County, is situated ou the south bank of 
White River, ou an average elevation of 
about thirty feet above low water mark; 
on what was originally a gently undu- 
lating plateau of considerable extent and 
admirably situated for the location of a 
town, with regard especially to perfect 
drainage, sewerage facilities, general 
cleanliness, and consequent health. On 
the latter point it may be as well to state 
just here, that the vital statistics for a 
period of years extending from 1867 to 
1880 show an average death rate per year 
of but a fraction over fifteen to each one 
thousand of population; a statement 
which speaks volumes for the health of 
the city. A further research in that di- 
rection reveals the fact, that in the city 
and township surrounding, there are at 
present living no less than seventy-two 
persons between the ages of 70 and 102 
years. 

The climate of Muncie, for a series of 
years, shows the average summer heat to 
be 70 degrees, and the average for winter 
to be 30 degrees; so that, on the whole, 
the climate is remarkably favorable; in 
fact, situated as it is midway between the 
great lakes anil the Ohio River, Muncie 
lies outside the track of the terrible 
storms which sweep down from the North- 
west toward the Atlantic coast, and 
equally so from those which originate - 
along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico 
and sweep toward the Northwest; and 
hence it will be seen that so far as its cli- 
matic changes are concerned, Muncie is J 
favorably and healthfully located 



POPULATION'. 

The population of the city is in excess 
of seven thousand souls; and in view of 
all the facilities afforded by its situation, 
it should be but a few years ere the pres- 
ent census is doubled. 

EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES. 

The educational facilities of Muncie 
are unsurpassed. A magnificent High 
School building, erected at a cost of some 
835,000, exclusive of its furnishing, and 
which has been supplied with the newest 
improved apparatus for chemical, elec- 
trical, philosophical, and various other 
scientific illustrations, affords an oppor- 
tunity for study equal to any of the semi- 
naries; while the Primary and Grammar 
grades, in the different wards, are pro- 
vided with three large and commodious 
buildings for their separate use and be- 
hoof, all of which are furnished with 
every modern appliance known to the 
art educational. The course of study 
pursued is in accordance with the most 
approved systems, and, in consequence, 
the graduate of the High School is ready 
to enter College. 

CHURCHES. 

No city of its size, in this or any other 
state, furnishes more or better church 
privileges than Muncie. The different 
denominations represented here are a* 
follows: Methodist Episcopal, Presbv- 
terian, Baptist, Universalis!, Christian* 
Protestant Episcopal, Roman Catholic^ 
Friends, Protestant Methpdist, African 
Methodist, and African Baptist. Allthese 
different denominations are in a flour- 
ishing condition, with fine edifices. 



CITY OF MUN'CIE. 



123 



CITY LIBRARY. 

'This organization was perfected in 
1874, and is now one of the institutions 
of the city. It has a fine reading room, 
is supplied with all the prominent papers 
and magazines of the day, besides upward 
of four thousand volumes upon its shelves, 
to which additions are being constantly 
made. 

BONDS AND TAXES. 

In 1882 the entire bouded indebted- 
ness of the city of Muncie was but 
$9,000; its rate of taxation for municipal 
purposes, interest on bonds, etc., being 
but 60 cents per 8100. The county had 
no indebtedness; hence the sum total of 
taxation for state, county, and municipal 
purposes was but $1.75 on each $100 of 
assessed valuation — a showing which can 
not fail to receive favorable consideration. 

BENEVOLENT ORDERS. 

The benevolent orders are in a most 
excellent condition, and among the Ma- 
sonic bodies, taking only the second rank 
in the state, are the '"Blue" Delaware 
Lodge, No. 46, organized in 1842; Muncie 
Lodge, No. 433, organized in 1870; Mun- 
cie Chapter, No. 30, R. A. M., organized 
in 1855; Muncie Council, No. 16, organ- 
ized in 1863; and Muncie Commandery, 
No. 18, organized in 1808. Then comes 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
with Muncie Lodge, No. 74, instituted in 
1849; Muncie Encampment, No. 30, in- 
stituted in 1852. Next in order comes 
the Independent Order of Red Men, 
whose council fire was first lighted in this 
city in 1873. Welcome Lodge, No, 37, 
Knights of Pythias, was organized the 
same year; and in 1875 Mutual Lodge, 
No. 122, Knights of Honor, was instituted; 
followed, in 1877, by the organization of 
Center Lodge, No. 42, Ancient Order of 
L T nited "Workmen, and in 1879 by the 
Fraternal Council, No. 362, Royal Arca- 
num. 



THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

The fire department is one of the most 
efficient, taking the third rank only to 
any in the state. It has a No. 3 Babcock 
and a No. 4 Clapp & Jones steamer, and 
a hook and ladder company. The depart- 
ment is divided into four companl- - of 
twelve men each, and are under first-class 
drill and discipline. 

The city is also lighted with gas of a 
good quality, and measures have 1 :*en 
taken to extend the works and increase 
their efficiency. 

. SHIPPING FACILITIES. 

A careful study of Muncie's railway 
connections and competition will show 
that freights from this point are from 
thirty-three to- forty per cent less than 
from any point in this vicinity. They 
have the Cleveland, Columbus, Ci: tcia- 
nati & Indianapolis R. R., giving di- 
rect communication with Cleveland, Co- 
lumbus, Dayton, Cincinnati and St. Louis; 
the Lake Erie & "Western, from San- 
dusky, O., to Bloomington, HL, and \ eing 
the second east and west road here will 
always result in low freights to the ship- 
per; also the Fort Wayne, Cincinnati & 
Louisville R. R., a north and south road 
having direct communication with all the 
principal points in either direction. 

In the following pages will be found 
brief reviews of the principal manufac- 
turing and mercantile interests in active 
operation. Increased capital with such, 
splendid facilities would find ample r ru 
and abundant returns in every bran.-: of 
business enumerated besides many oihers, 
as there is scarcely a branch of mar. v. fa c- 
ture but may be successfully ear. r n 
here. Excellent locations for the erec- 
tion of manufactories are to be had at 
low rates in close proximity to the vari- 
ous lines of railways, and those contem- 
plating seeking a location cannot find one 
offering equal inducements elsewhere. 



124 



STATE OF INDIANA. 






JAMES BOYCE & CO., 

Manufacturers of Flax Machinery 

and Bagging, etc. 
While it is universally conceded that 
America offers almost unlimited possibilities 
in human accomplishments, it is equally true 
that there are comparatively few who rise to 
special prominence and distinction as leaders 
in the advance and development of our indus- 
trial and manufacturing resources. The sub- 
ject of our present sketch furnishes a fit illus- 
tration of this limited class of men, showing 
as it does what can be accomplished by a sin- 
gle individual, unaided by the wealth or influ- 
ence of others. Mr. James Boyce, the senior 
member and founder of this establishment, 
was born in Ireland. When 21 years of age 
he left his native land without means to even 
pay his passage across the Atlantic, but this 
obstacle was overcome by shipping on board 
as a common sailor before the mast. Landing 
in the New World, he was not only destitute 
of means but soon found himself $$0 in debt, 



known for his supply. This is supplied by a 
fiberous plant produced in India, known as 
jute, which is largely brought to this country 
by vessels as ballast. This article being free 
of duty, has almost entirely superceded flax frar 
the manufacture of bagging. When this busi- 
ness was first started by Mr. Boyce he used 
but two looms, producing about 500 yards of 
bagging per day, but availing himself of every 
facility tor meeting the requirements of the 
business, he subsequently introduced the 
newest improved machinery. In 1S76 he 
purchased at the Centennial Exposition, at 
Philadelphia, the best machinery for this pur- 
pose there exhibited, being of English manu- 
facture, subject to an ad valorum duty of 45^ 
per cent., yet only obtainable from that source. 
At the present time this establishment occu- 
pies a main building two stories in height^ 
covering a ground space ot 60x155 feet, at 
machine shop 30x70 feet and a boiler and!. 
engine room'35x52 feet. The wareroom space 
is 40x250 feet, and nearly all of these build- 



m 



jpljf&^ : ,-v||ffi||f ~0 : m 



BOYCE S BAGGING AND FLAX MILLS. 



without any visible means of relief. He sub- 
sequently found employment in the skutching 
of flax, a" branch of industry of which he had 
some practical knowledge, acquired in his 
native land. Although the most simple and 
crude methods were then employed, it un- 
doubtedly served as a basis for Mr. Boyce's 
future success as one of our most prominent 
manufacturers. To his ingenuity is largely 
due the improvements and rapid progress 
made in this department of industry, the 
breaks now being manufactured by him being 
acknowledged far superior to all others now 
in use. In 1S79 Mr. Boyce had secured some 
means, and coming to this city, commenced 
business with a capital of $10,000, which he 
invested chiefly in an establishment devoted 
to the manufacture of tlax tow. He subse- 
quently introduced the necessary machinery 
for the manufacture of bagging, and in conse- 
quence of the difficulties experienced from the 
limited amount of tlax produced, he found it 
necessary to resort to the best substitute 



ings are substantially constructed of brick. 
Eighteen looms are employed, with a daily 
capacity of io,Soo yards, showing an increase 
of over 100 per cent, over the facilities em- 
ployed for the first few years, and while these 
works still rank the fifth in size in the United 
States, they stand to-day the first in point of 
outfit and perfection of machinery utilized. 
An average force of 150 hands are employed 
in the various departments, the products of 
the bagging works being usually in large 
demand in the cotton growing states. As 
showing some of the difficulties with which. 
Mr. Boyce has had to contend, it may be noted 
that twice have his works been burned, bat 
with unflagging energy and enterprise they 
were immediately rebuilt on an enlarged sca3e_ 
In connection with these works is conducted 
a handle factory, the building of which covers, 
a ground space of 30x00 feet, power being sup- 
plied from the main engine of 150 horse 
power. These works turn out from 30,000 to 
40,000 spade handles annually, which ai& 



CITY OF MUNCIE. 



125 



chiefly shipped to various points East. 
Through the enterprise of Mr. Boyce the 
manufacture of bagging was introduced into 
this section of the country. From the growth 
and rapid development of this enterprise has 
sprung other extensive and important manu- 
facturing interests, exerting its beneficial 
effects in a marked degree upon this city and 
its surroundings. The summer of 1SS4 will 
witness the commencement of another exten- 
sive manufacturing enterprise, with Mr. Boyce 
as its founder. This like its predecessor, is a 
new branch of industry for Indiana or the 
West. It is the manufacture of the best grade 
of harvesting twine, used by harvesting ma- 
chines in the binding of grain, made from 
manila. Combined with this enterprise will 
be conducted a spoke factory. The building* 
for these new industries are now being erect- 
ed, and when completed, will add another sub- 
stantial brick building 50x200 feet, with its 
complete machinery for the successful execu- 






mw 




BOYCE S BLOCK. 

tion of work. Mr. Boyce also holds a con- 
trolling interest in other enterprises here, 
among which we may mention the firm of 
Boyce & Bufkin, dealers in agricultural ma- 
chinery. He also holds valuable real estate in 
various parts of the city and owns one of the 
finest business blocks in the city. The annual 
transactions of his establishment and the 
manufacturing and commercial interests com- 
prise an aggregated sum equaled by few in 
Eastern Indiana. Unassuming in manners, 
and yet prominent in the promotion of every 
enterprise which promises to conduce to the 
public welfare, Mr. Boyce has doubtless con- 
tributed more to the well being and business 
interests of this city than any other individual, 
and while his success is a matter of self con- 
gratulation, his record forms a lesson for the 
rising generation which cannot fail to have a 
beneficial effect in stimulating industry, fru- 
gality and rectitude. A. J. Meeks, his asso- 
ciate and partner in business, is a young man 
of good business qualifications, well and favora- 
bly known in business circles. 



F. W. HEATH & CO., 

Brokers and Investing Agents, Main 

Street. 
Intimately identified with the fundiciary 
institutions of this city snd state, and as brok- 
ers in money notes, stocks, bonds and real 
estate, the house of F. W. Heath & Co , of 
this city, in its transactions in the various de- 
partments, assumes an importance scarcely 
second to any other establishment in this sec- 
tion of the state. There are few instance^ in 
which individual effort and enterprise have 
been more marked than is shown in the in- 
stance of the senior member of this firm, who 
has secured his present position in business 
and commercial circles by his own unaided 
efforts. This house dates its origin to 1S73. at 
which time it commenced in a comparatively 
small way — as dealers in real estate — since 
which time their operations have widened in 
their scope and volume until its annual transac- 
tions involves large proportions. With ample 
facilities for collections and the handling of 
reliable negotiable paper, about two years ago 
they opened a bank of discount, in wnich they 
negotiate loans, buy and sell authentic com- 
mercial paper, notes, stocks and bonds and 
make a specialty of making investments for 
capitalists. In their real estate transactions 
they control city lots and property, valuable 
farms in various sections of this and other 
states and territories, enjoying unsurpassed 
advantages for transactions in this depart- 
ment. They also give attention to the pay- 
ment of taxes for non-residents and to the ex- 
amination of titles and the preparation of 
abstracts of title. The individual members of 
this firm are Fred. W. Heath and George L. 
Lennon, both of whom enjoy an enviable rep- 
utation, both as business men and careful and 
accomplished financiers. In their association 
with the business interests of this city and 
state, they have exhibited that enterprise and 
correct business policy which has served to 
promote their popularity and at the same time 
contribute in no small degree to the progres- 
sive interests of this section of the state. ThLs 
article in all its literary responsibility is the 
voluntary expression of the editors of this 
work. 



A. J. RILEY, 

Groceries and Provisions, Cor. Main 

and High Sts. 
Mr. A. J. Riley, the proprietor of the gro- 
cery and provision house located at the corner 
of "Main and High Sts., is a native of Mont- 
gomery Co., O., where he was born in 1S30. 
When'quite young he came to this state, now- 
half a century ago, and in 1850 came to this> 
city, where he has since resided. For over a 
quarter of a century he has been identified 
with the grocery trade and with the gradual 
growth and prosperity of this city. He opened! 
his present grocery and provision house as 
recently as August, 1SS3, and now occupies 
for business purposes a room 20x40 feet in di- 



126 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



mensions, beside* celier underneath. He car- 
ries a full stock of the best groceries and pro- 
visions, embracing choice teas, coffees, spices, 
sugars, syrups, canned goods, notions, fresh 
country produce, etc., comprising every 
■description of home and table supplies in this 
line. The extensive and favorable acquaint- 
ance he enjoys, both in city and country, has 
•contributed toward an established trade which 
embraces already many of the best families of 
the city and country. Mr. Riley was appoint- 
ed Stationery Clerk in the State Senate during 
the winter* of 1S60 and 1S61, and during the 
war held important positions of trust in gov- 
ernment offices. 



CORNELIUS & COLEMAN, 
Novelty Works. 

Within the last decade, at least, no organ- 
ization of mechanical skill or business ability 
in this section of the state has given promise 
-of more important results than is indicated bv 
the recent organization of the Cornelius & 
•Coleman Novelty Works, of this city, in the 
production of the specialties to which these 
works are devoted. 

The Improved Cornelius Roller Skate. 
— Some years ago Mr. W. F. Cornelius in- 
vented a roller skate, which at the time 
appeared to meet the requirements of the 
times. This skate is now manufactured and 
•controlled by another firm, and noticing im- 
portant defects, Mr. Cornelius applied himself 
to obviating these and to securing improve- 
ments which would secure a roller 6kate far 
surpassing all others in the market. The 
"Improved Cornelius Roller Skate," upon 
•which letters patent have been applied for bv 
this company, presents the following superior 
points over all other roller skates in the market : 
.{i). Every part is 'so accurately adjusted that 
each roller sets squarely upon the surface, 
without any rocking or uneven motion to the 
skate. (2). It is adjustable to all required 6izes, 
in the truck moving backward or forward, 
which may be easily accomplished, even when 
upon the feet, without removal. (3). These 
skates are constructed with both iron and 
wood bottom and are adjustable the same in 
wood as iron bottoms. This skate has been 
thoroughly tested by experts and pronounced 
the most perfect rink skate in the market and 
is manufactured by this company for the 
trade at as low rates as any contemporaneous 
house in the Union. Correspondence solicited. 

Another set of articles of rare utility, in- 
vented and patented by this company, is The 
Cornelius Double Flexible and Re- 
versable rubbhr window cleaners and 
Floor Scrubbers. The window cleaners 
are constructed with wood and steel cleets on 
-•each side, having two independent cleaning 
surfaces. In this respect they offer to the 
consumer double the capacity in use over any 
-Other similar article in the market. The 
scrubber, which is heavier, is constructed upon 
the same principle and offers the same ad- 
vantages in use The combination handle 



holder for these is so constructed that it is 
readily adjusted to either window cleaner, 
window brush or floor scrubber, or to scrub- 
bing brush or mops. The handle hofder i* 
provided with a ratchet device which firmly 
secures anything to which it is attached. Mr- 
Cornelius, the patentee of these devices, is a. 
native of Burlington, Boone County, Ky\, but 
removed earlv in life to Cincinnati, O., where 
his early life was spent. Although for many 
years engaged in the business of house, sign 
and ornamental painting, his native ability 
and inclination for mechanical operations and 
inventive genius led him to engage in his 
present enterprises. He came to this city 
about 1 2 years ago, where his various patents 
and enterprises have contributed essentially to 
the fame of this city as a business center. 
Mr. A R. Coleman, who is associated in this 
enterprise, is noticed elsewhere in connection 
with another important industry, and since 
coming to this city no one individual has 
probably shown more public spirit and enter- 
prise or contributed in a more marked degree 
to its industrial prosperity. 

J. L. STREETER & CO., 

Produce Dealers and Shippers or 

Dressed Poultry. 
This representative house was established! 
in 1S75 and commencing under the most 
favorable auspices its business has steadily 
increased and the scope of its operations en- 
larged until it now transacts an annual busi- 
ness of more than $150,000. The premises 
occupied for storage and sales purposes em- 
brace one two story building 45x50 feet im 
dimensions and a one story structure 35x50 
feet in size. The firm procures its supplies 
from the merchants and producers in all parts- 
of Indiana and Ohio and keeps a number of 
buyers continually on the road securing pro- 
duce of every description at the most advan- 
tageous rates. As an index of the magni- 
tude of the transactions of this house a few- 
facts and figures may be appropriately intro- 
duced in this connection. During the past 
year the firm handled more than 24,0001 
bushels of corn and have at their warehouse a. 
corn-crib with a capacity for 12,000 bushels at 
one time. During a portion of 18S3 they 
shipped to New York City alone, three car- 
loads, or about 30,000 dozen eggs per weet, 
and in its appropriate season 10,000 to 1,500© 
pounds of dressed poultry per week. They 
also handle annually more than 1 50,000 pound*, 
of choice butter and deal extensively in oat*y 
beans, wool, seeds, etc., employing an average; 
force ot aVout 20 assistants in their sales, pack- 
ing and shipping department-. Mr. J. L- 
Stieeter, to whose efforts, enterprise andi 
sagacity this house is indebted for the succck* 
which has characterized its career, i^ a native 
and lifelong resident of Delaware County, andi 
in addition to the management of his exten- 
sive mercantile interests, is at the present 
time serving a second term in the responsible 
position of County Recorder. 



CITY OF MUNC1E. 



127 



J. TRUITT, 

Hard Wood Lumber. 
Making a prominent specialty of manufac- 
turing and shipping walnut, ash, oak and 
■other hard wood lumber, the house of Mr. J 
Truitt, of Muncie, claims recognition as one 
•of the important vitalizing industries of our 
thriving city and one of the leading establish- 
ments of Central Indiana in this special branch 
■of trade. This representative house was estab- 
lished in 1S74 by its present enterprising pro- 
prietor, who has since conducted the business 
•with the evception of one year, during which 
period the firm name was Truitt & Rocken- 
field. The plant in this city covers a ground 
space of about two acres, upon which is 
-erected an L shaped building, with an area of 
-6,000 square feet, equipped with two large and 
three smaller saws, propelled by one 50 horse 
power engine and boiler. 'The average weekly 
-capacity of the mills is 40,000 feet per week, 
although they have turned out and cut 20,000 
feet of selected logs per day. Handling dur- 
ing the past year an approximate of i,coo,ooo 
feet of lumber, the aggregate transactions of 
Mr. Truitt will range from $20,000 to $25,000 
-per year. A great portion of the output of 
his mills is purchased by railroad companies 
and car shops in Indiana, Ohio and Illinois, 
while his shipments to dealers and manufac- 
turers East form no inconsiderable item in the 
financial estimates of Muncie's commercial 
importance. Mr. Truitt purchases the greater 
portion of his material "on the stump" and 
-during the season employs about 25 men and 
-teams at a weekly expense of not less than 
$300. He also transact^ considerable custom 
work and has a large local demand. Mr. 
Truitt is a native of Adams County, O., and 
first came to Indiana in 1830, iocating in this 
section. He taught school for five years and 
-occupied the responsible position of County 
Surveyor for the county for the same length 
of time. He has been prominently identified 
with numerous commercial and industrial 
■enterprises and was engaged in the marble 
business prior to embarking in that which 
now occupies his attention. 

R. THOMPSON, 

Agricultural Implements, Cor. Wal- 
nut and Charles Sts. 
" The growth of any city depends almost en- 
tirely upon the wealth and development of 
agricultural districts that surround it and we 
find, after a long experience in the compila- 
tion of industrial statistics, that there is no 
branch of industry that conduces more largely 
to the general thrift or prosperity oi any sec- 
tion than does the business of manufacturing 
-or selling agricultural implements. The gen- 
tleman whose name furnishes the subject of 
this editorial began business as a dealer in 
agricultural implements five years ago and the 
establishment of his house supplied for this 
section a long and keenly felt want. The room 
•occupied is 22x25 * eet m dimensions and his 



business necessitates the employment of two 
assistants. Mr. Thompson keeps on hand all 
the latest improvements in his line and any 
I implement or farm machine that is adapted to 
this section can be purcha-ed of him- at satis- 
factory prices and on rea-onable terms. 
Among the list of manufacturers that are 
represented by Mr. Thompson we may men- 
tion AuUman & Miller, of Akron, O": P. P. 
Mast, of Springfield, O.; J. W.Stoddard, of 
Dayton. O.; the St. Joseph Manufacturing 
Companv, of this state, and A. Shun'-., of 
Bucvrus^ O. These manufacturers are so ex- 
tensively known and their products have 
achieved a reputation so universal that any 
further laudation on the part of the writer 
would be entirely unnecessary. Mr. Thomp- 
son is a native of this state and an enter; ris- 
ing merchant. His trade extends throughout 
this entire section and has grown largely since 
the dateot its inception. 



MUNCIE STEAM LAUNDRY, 

C. C Haller, Prop., West Main St. 
This house originally started by the present 
proprietor November 17th, 1SS2, and has since 
that time, through the most discouraging ob- 
stacles with w'hich it has had to contend, 
maintained an established and gradually grow- 
ing business. Tho*e desiring laundry work 
are assured the facilities enjoyed by Mr. Haller 
are such that he can guarantee his work to 
meet the approval of the most fastidious. He 
enjoys the advantages of steam and all modern 
appliances for the execution of work in the 
best manner, his motto being "good honest 
work at lowest living prices. Mr. Haller is a 
native of Franklin, Warren Count;. O., where 
he was born in 1S47. He has 'had an ex- 
perience of over three years in this branch 01 
business, and both from" the advantages secured 
bv homework as well as for the efficiency and 
enterprise he exhibits, is he entitled to the 
liberal patronage of our citizens and vicinity. 

CHARLES WILDERMUTH, 

Baker and Confectioner, 146 South 
Walnut St. 

The enterprising gentleman whose name 
heads this editorial was born in German; in 
1S44. He has resided in Indiana for 15 years 
and has been in pursuit of his present business 
since 1S71. He began in a small way, but by 
energy and a thorough adapta ion to this par- 
ticular branch of business he has succeeded in 
largely increasing his trade until his estab- 
lishment ranks among the leading houses of 
its kind in this section. Mr. Wiktermuth 
makes a specialty of bread and cakes, his pro- 
ducts being of the very highest standard of 
excellence, from 1,500 to 2,0c o pound- of flour 
being consumed weekly. }\c is prepared to 
turnout fine articles in his Hue for weddings, 
balls, parties and other gatherings. II is estab- 
lishment is characterized by neatness and 
cleanliness and presents an Inviting appear- 
ance. 



128 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



B. B. ALLEN, 

Cigars, Tobaccos, etc., Opera Block. 
Mr. Allen began the business in which he 
has been so eminently successful in 1S7S. He 
occupies a salesroom in the Opera House 
Block 25x20 feet in dimension* and carries a 
full line of the finest brands ol cig irs, tobaccos, 
pipes and smokers' articles, etc. He controls 
the most central position of any house in this 
line in Mun ie ami h s increased his business 
full v three fold since the date of its inception. 
Mr. Allen is a native of Vermont, where he 
was born in 1S26. He came to Indiana seven 
years ago from Kentucky, where he had re- 
sided for some time. He rendered his coun- 
try efficient service during the war of the 
rebellion and achieved a brilliant record. He 
served in the 40th Ohio one and one-half 
years and in the Sth Ohio Battery the same 
length of time, serving in all a period of three 
years, securing an honorable military record. 
He enlisted as a private, but was subsequently 
promoted to the position of Lieutenant in 
Company K, 40th O. V. I., and after resigning 
on account of ill health was chosen Captain 
and Major successively of the 2Sth O. N. G. 
He was on detached strvice during a greater 
part of the time, holding at one time the posi- 
tion of Provost Marshal at Louisville, Ky\, 
and was honorably discharged in 1S65. After 
the war he settled in Stoddard County, Mo., 
where he taught school successfully for eight 
years. He also fol.owed the profession of 
teaching in Kentucky, Tenne-see and in other 
states before coining to this city and engaging 
in his present enterprise. 



COX & SEATON, 

Meat Market, South Walnut St. 
These gentlemen began the business in 
which they are engaged two years ago and 
have succeeded in building up a substantial 
and established trade, by the superior excel- 
lence of their stock and the cleanliness which 
marks their excellent market. They kill 
about iS beeves per month and other stock in 
proportion. In addition to this they deal 
largely in the buying and selling of cattle. 
Their market is located on South Walnut St. 
and is 20x40 feet in dimensions, with cooling 
room and other conveniences attached, in 
which they enjoy the amplest facilities for 
handling and disposing of every description of 
meats. The members of the firm devote their 
personal attention to the interests of their 
business and employ two additional hands, 
killing their stock, slaughtering none but those 
which are sound and healtby. One wagon is 
used for delivering and business purposes, and 
they number ;<mong their patrons many of the 
best patrons of both city and country. They 
carry in stock at all times the best fresh meats 
the market affords, with sausages, bologna etc., 
in their season. The individual members of 
this firm are Eli Cox and Valentine Seaton, 
both of whom have a practical knowledge of 
the business in which they are engaged. Mr. 



Cox is a native of this state, while Mr. Seaton- 
is a native of Wyandot County, O. The lat- 
ter has resided in this state, however, for 15 
years and in this, county for eight years, where 
he was identified with the lumber trade before 
engaging in his present business. 



WEB. GILBERT, 

Livery, Feed and Sale Stable, Cor. 

Walnut and Adams Srs. 
These well known and largely patronized 
stables were opened about 15 years ago by J. 
M. Thomas. After a time the firm became 
Thomas & Bowers, then Bowers ..V. Weeks, 
then Weeks & Son, then Weeks & Kim- 
brough, then C. Kimbrough, but soon gave 
way to Smith & Gilbert, who in March, 1SS3, 
were succeeded by the present enterprising 
proprietor, Mr. Web. Gilbert. These stables 
are conveniently located on the corner of" 
Adams and Walnut Sts. and are 120x40 feet 
in dimensions, to which is attached a buggy 
shed 60 feet in width. Sixty- five head or 
horses can be conveniently accommodated. 
From 12 to iS first class roadsters are kept for 
livery purposes and Mr. Gilbert is prepared to 
furnish as fine a turnout in the shape of a 
single or double livery rig as can be had any- 
where in this section. His patronage is large 
and lucrative, his being one of the leading 
stables in Muncie. Mr. Gilbert is a native of 
Monroe County, N. Y., but came to Indiana 
24 years ago He was identified with the 
meat and grain business before taking charge 
of his present enterprise. He is reliable, 
prompt and courteous in all his transactions, 
his establishment being a representative one 
in every respect. 

W. ED. RICHEY, 

Drugs and Notions, East Main St. 
In reviewing the various manufacturing and 
mercantile interests of Delaware County, the 
drug trade is worthy of a prominent position 
among the most prosperous and thrifty mer- 
cantile establishments of the county. With 
few exceptions this branch of industry is char- 
acterized by able and judicious management. 
In Muncie there are seven drug houses; 
especially prominent is the drug house of W. 
Ed. Richey, established over 20 years ago. 
His drug house is conveniently located in the 
business portion of the city, occupying a store- 
room 60x65 feet. The stock carried embraces 
full lines of pure drugs, chemicals, standard 
and proprietory medicines, toilet and per- 
fumery articles and druggists' sundries gen- 
erally. One assistant is employed in the 
prescription department and prompt and accu- 
rate attention is given to the compounding of 
physicians' prescriptions and family recipes. 
Mr. Richey is a practical druggist, thoroughly 
competent for the duties and responsibilities of 
the position he rills. His house being one of 
the old reliable drug establishments of the 
city, he controls a growing and prosperous 
trade. He was born in Ohio in 1S46 but is an 



CITY OF MUNCIE. 



129 



old resident of Muncie, where he is well and 
favorably known in business circles. 

L. L. WELLER, 

Manufacturer of Organs, East Main 

Street. 
Success in any department of business de- 
pends to a very large extent upon intelligent 
proficiency, which involves a thorough practi- 
cal knowledge of all the minute details em- 
braced therein. This is more particularly true 
in its application to the fine and intricate 
■departments of trade in which Mr. Weller is 
engaged, viz., that of manufacturing and sell- 
ing parlor and cabinet organs. He established 
his factory here in 1S79 in a comparatively 
•small way. The original factory and its con- 
tents was destroyed by fire, causing considera- 
ble loss. The present factory building, just 
completed, is a substantial brick building 30x45 
-feet, two stories, with engine and boiler house 
30x35. The ground occupied tor yard, stor- 
age, lumber, etc., is one and one-half acres. 
The entire equipment is very complete, afford- 
ing the most ample facilities for the rapid and 
■economical execution of work in this line. 
The favorable location of Muncie with regard 
to its facilities for the supply of material, as 
well as a field for trade, ensures the success of 
this enterprise. The organs here produced 
are noted for their superior tone and workman- 
ship. Wherever introduced, the products of 
this establishment are pronounced by ama- 
teurs and professionals to be equal to the high- 
est priced instruments now before the public. 
Worthy of special notice in this connection is 
the fact that organs purchased here are pur- 
chased at a less cost than that of any other 
establishment, with perhaps one single excep- 
tion. This desirable feature of the business is 
•worthy of public consideration. Unlike nearly 
all other organ factories, no agents or sub- 
agents, offices or branch offices employed, at 
high salaries, rents or commissions". All 
organs manufactured here are sold direct from 
the factory at the lowest factory prices, thus 
avoiding an extra cost of 40 or 50 per cent, 
that must be paid by the purchaser when he 
purchases from other establishments, who in 
order to sell their products, produced in locali- 
ties where material and labor are higher than 
in the West, necessitates the employment of 
traveling agents with high salaries or com- 
missions that must be added to the price of 
the organ; to the intelligent purchaser these 
facts are instructive and admonish him as to 
how he can subserve his own interest when 
purchasing an organ. Complete facilities are 
afforded the general public who are desirous 
of purchasing instruments; price lists, illus- 
trated catalogues with terms, advice and in- 
structions, descriptive, full and complete, 
are sent to any address on application, afford- 
ing the family at a distance all the information 
necessary to make a judicious selection of any 
6tyle of instrument manufactured. All com- 
munications must be addressed to L. L. 
Weller, Muncie, Ind. 



R. & I. MEEKS Sc CO., 

Furniture, No. 73 East Mais St. 
The oldest business house in Muncie, with 
possibly a single exception, and the only es- 
tablishment in the city engaged exclusively in 
the manufacture and sale of furniture, is that 
which forms the subject ol the present sketch 
and which for a period of 40 years ha< been a 
familiar landmark to the citizens ot Delaware 
and adjoining counties. This representative 
house, which was founded as early as 1S44, 
commenced business upon a ca<h capital of 
only $5, and from this comparatively insignifi- 
cant commencement has grown the extensive 
establishment which to-day ranks among the 
leading industries of Central Indiana. The 
sales and warerooms occupied bv Messrs. R. 
Sc I. Meeks & Co., at No. 73 Ea<t Main Sl, 
comprise a commodious three story building 
42x90 feet in dimensions, where will be found 
at all times a large assortment of furniture, 
from the finest and most expensive parlor, 
drawing-room, bed-room and library sets to the 
common and cheaper varieties, adapted to the 
requirements of the more economically in- 
clined. The factory building, located on Elm, 
between Main and Washington Sts., i- a two 
story structure 25x60 feet in size and equipped 
throughout with machinery tor the manufac- 
ture of all kinds of furniture and cabinet work, 
with the exception of chairs and upholstered 
goods. Nine or ten workmen are employed 
and the motive power for the machinery in 
use is supplied by a steam engine and boiler. 
Messrs. R. and I. Meeks are brothers and 
natives of Western Virginia. They have 
been residents of this state for nearly half a 
century and are both practical and experienced 
cabinet makers. The flattering degree of suc- 
cess which has attended their career since 
embarking in business in this city on their 
own account has been richly merited and 
fairly earned by an honorable and enterprising 
method of conducting their business, which 
has gained for them the confidence and re- 
spect of the entire community and a trade 
extending throughout this and adjoining coun- 
ties. 



GEORGE L. ELLIOTT, 

Jewelry, Silverware, etc. 
In one of the most prominent, attractive and 
eligible business locations in the beautiful and 
progressive city of Muncie, in Wysor's Opera 
House building, is situated the popular and 
well known jewelry house of Mr. George L. 
Elliott, which has for more than a quarter of 
a century been the recognized headquarters in 
this section for the finer grades of foreign. ..nd 
American watches, clocks, jewelry oi every 
description, solid silver and heavily plated 
table ware, spectacles, eye glasses and optical 
instruments, etc. This house was founded in 
1S57 by its present enterprising proprietor 
upon a comparatively moderate scale, but each 
succeeding year has witnessed a gratifying 
growth and steady increase of trade, until at 



130 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



the present time his annual transactions will 
exceed $15,000 and the valuation of his stock 
will reach fully $6,000. Mr. Elliott makes a 
specialty of fine watch repairing, engraving 
and general jewelry repairs. He has in use at 
his establishment one of S. D. Engles's en- 
graving machines, which enables him to 
engrave at short notice initials, monograms, 
names or inscriptions on articles sold by him, 
giving superior facilities for this class of work 
and ensuring most beautiful designs and exe- 
cutions. By the means of this ingenious 
machine engraving is executed in the most 
elegant style in less than half the time re- 
quired by hand work. Mr. Elliott is a native 
ef Springfield, O., but has resided in Muncie 
since 1S55. He is a practical watchmaker and 
jeweler and an energetic and progressive 
business man. 



S. HART, 

Proprietor of Hart's Bazar and In- 
ventor of Hart's Patent Window 
Ventilator, 26 Walnut St. 
Mr. Hart is a native of Germany, but has 
been a resident of Indiana for 35 years. He 
has been identified with mercantile circles for 
a period of 29 years, but opened his present 
business, that of a dealer in ladies' and gents' 
furnishing goods, notions, etc., in 1S76. His 
establishment is known as Hart's Bazar. The 
stock carried is complete in every particular, 
containing the latest and most fashionable 
goods in his line. He is assisted by four 
members of his family and pairons invariably 
meet with the most prompt and polite at- 
tention. I lis bazar is visited by thousands of 
people and the sales of the house, although 
now lucrative and satisfactory, are still on the 
increase. But the work that has made Mr. 
Hart >o deservedly popular and established for 
him a trade that extends throughout the entire 
country, was the invention of his "Patent 
Show ' Window Ventilator." This is an 
achievement worthy of special mention. It is 
guaranteed to keep show windows from sweat- 
ing and freezing. Mr. Hart's charges for 
right of applying his invention are $10 for 
perpetual use for a window not having over 
six foot front. It can be put in by any skilled 
carpenter and can be used in any enclosed 
show window, providing the frame above the 
glass is not less than tuo to three inches in 
width. It was patented in the United States 
August 1st, 1SS2; in Canada August 10th, 
1SS2, and patents are applied for in foreign 
countries. The numerous testimonials re- 
ceived by Mr. Hart prove conclusively that 
the ventilator gives complete satisfaction 
wherever thoroughly tested We quote from 
a few of them, known to the public as re- 
sponsible parties: R. Rothschild & So. , fur- 
niture dealers of Cincinnati, under date of De- 
cember 71I1, 188.2, write, "This is the coldest 
dav we have had this year, still our window 
shows no sign of frost and is perfectly clear; - ' 
John H. Sykes, dealer in h.ats and caps, of 
Terre Haute, irui., says, ' l T would not do 



without it for five times its cost;" Martin* 
Simon, baker and confectioner, ot Cincinnati, 
says, "I considero it fills a 'ong felt want and 
it is one of the most important inventions for 
retailers." It is needless for us to give any 
further laudation of its merits; it is guaranteed 
to give perfect satisfaction. Mr. Hart is push- 
ing his enterprise with commendable zeal and 
vigor and deserves the success he has already 
achieved. 

WRIGHT & GARRARD, 

Funeral Directors and Manufac- 
turers and Dealers in Household 
and Office Furniture, No. 45 Public 
Square, South Side. 
The present house had its origin in 1S79, at 
which time it was started by Mr. William 
Wright and his son, Mr. C- K." Wright, under 
the firm name of Wright & Son. After one 
year the senior member of the firm retired and 
Jerrie Garrard was admitted to partnership, 
since which time the firm name has remained 
as at present. The premises occupied by this- 
house is 21x125 f eet m dimensions, embrac- 
ing the first and second floors and base- 
ment. The main salesroom is devoted to dis- 
play of the various articles comprehended in 
the different departments of their extensive 
business and comprises a large and varied stock 
of every description of household furniture of 
both common and finer grades, including com- 
mon and extension tables, chairs of all desira- 
ble varieties, parlor, dining room and kitchen 
sets, common and unique designs in bed- 
steads, bureaus, secretaries lounges, brackets,, 
sofas, office furniture, etc. They also carry a 
full line of undertakers' supplies, coffins, cas- 
kets and burial cases, and are provided with 
every facility for pron pt attention to this de- 
partment. They have a first class hearse and 
are prepared to attend funerals in city or coun- 
try and will, where so desired, take full con- 
trol and supply everything essential on funeral 
occasions. The basement it devoted to >tor-, 
age purposes, while the second floor is used a* 
the manufacturing department, where they 
are prepared to make to order any special de- 
signs of household, office or bar furniture upon 
reasonable terms. This house enjoys the. 
amplest facilities in its departments of trade 
and is able lo compete with any contempora- 
neous establishment in this section of the 
state, and in its various branches transacts an 
annual business which will bear favorabl com-- 
parison with the leading houses in the-e lines in 
this district. Mr. C. K. Wright is a native of 
Wayne County, this state, where lie was born 
in 1S50, but when but three years of age his 
parents removed to Randolph County. He 
came to this city in 1S79, since which time he 
has been identified with tiie operations of this- 
house. Mr. Jerrie Garrard is a native of War- 
ren County, O., where he was born in 1^45., 
He came ro this state in 1557, where he has, 
been ! irgely engaged in mercantile and com- 
mercial operations up to about the time of be- 
coming associated with the present business. .. 



CITY OF MUNCIE. 



m 



OPERA HOUSE GROCERY, 

D. R. Pershing, Prop., Opera Block. 
' This house, although inaugurated as re- 
cently as 1SS0, has succeeded by the exercise 
of an aggressive and liberal business policy in 
outstripping many of its older contemporaries 
and placing itself in the front rank as a depot 
of- home supplies. The premises occupied 
embrace one room 20x70 feet, in addition to 
basement, which is fitted up in metropolitan 
style and kept stocked with the best and fresh- 
est groceries and provisions, consisting of 
choice teas, coffees, sugars, syrups, canned 
goods, notions, queensware, glasswa'e, etc. 
The facilities enjoyed by this house for pro- 
curing supplies from producers, importers 
and the best jobbing houses in the country are 
not surpassed by any contemporaneous house 
in the West, while "their annual transactions 
will already bear favorable comparison with 
any similar house in* this section of the state, 
reaching about $20,000. Mr. Pershing is a 
native of Westmorland County, Pa., where he 
was born in 1820. Coming to this state when 
quite young, he has for a period ot 40 years 
been identified with the literary pursuits, busi- 
ness and progressive industries of this state. 
He has for about a quarter ot a century been 
associated with literary institutions. He was 
the publisher and proprietor of the Warsaw 
Democrat in 1850-51, of the Fulton County 
Flag 1853-55, Roe/tester Sentinel 1S57-58 and 
editor and correspondent of various papers up 
to January, 1S76. He then held the portion 
Of political editor of the daily and weekly 
Ft. Wayne Gazette, which position he held up 
to the time he came to this city, about eight 
years ago. Here he was the publisher and 
proprietor of the Muncie Weekly Times, which 
paper he successfully conducted up to July of 
1877. It should be noted in this connection 
that Mr. Pershing is the father of the arrange- 
ment and location of local news and items on 
the third page, now almost in universal use by 
the press of the whole country. Active in 
promoting the material, civil and political 
welfare of the community, he was chosen and 
served as Deputy Auditor of Kosciusko 
County for a period of four years and of Ful- 
ton County from 1S52 to "1S59. 

MOCK BROS., 

Brick Manufacturers. 

Adopting the most important and appar- 
ently desirable . features of the machinery 
deviled by his predecessors and rejecting those 
which experience had shown to be defective 
and unsatisfactory, at the same time intro- 
ducing important improvements of his own, 
Mr. F. J. Mock, of the well known firm of 
Meek Bros., brick manufacturers, of Muncie, 
Lnd., has invented and patented machinery 
which has been pronounced by practical pro- 
ducers and experts in this line the most per- 
fect, satisfactory and economical of any yet 
placed before the public. The different devices 
•applied to the handling of the clay before it is I 



conveyed to the machine and the superior 
quality of brick as they are made, keeping- 
time and working harmoniously together, are 
immense advantages over anything which has 
yet been introduced to expediate and cheaper* 
the cost of manufacturing. By the use of this 
machine the process of brick making has been 
completely revolutionized and a better article 
of brick is produced at a smaller cost than by 
any former process. One machine now in 
use is turning out 16,000 brick per day, at an. 
expense for motive power and help of only $8. 
Horse power is employed here, but bv the 
substitution of steam it is claimed that the 
capacity can be increased 100 per cent, or 
more at a very small additional expense. The 
firm of Mock Bros, is composed ot Mes~r~. 
James F. and John D. Mock, both of whom 
are old residents of Indiana and thoroughly 
conversant with the brick business in all its 
details. In addition to the manufacture of 
brick and the machines above noticed, which 
they are now introducing with great succe-s^ 
this firm makes a specialty of the manufac- 
ture of a corn planter possessing numerous- 
marked improvements over the varieties ordi- 
narily in use, doing its work in packed ground 
with greater speed, accuracy and efficiency 
than any other now before the public. The 
enterprise above noted, although compara- 
tively in its infancy, bids fair to become one of 
our most important industries. 



C. H. GREEN, 

Stoves axdHoise Furnishing Goods, 

Meeks Block. 
In the preparation of this work we take 
special pains to give more than an ordinary- 
notice to those industries that have bv abl'er 
and honorable business management grown to 
prominence and importance from small ar.d 
unpromising beginnings. Mr. C. H. Green 
began the stove and tinware business 12 years 
ago in a room 12x20 feet in dimensions. The 
room now occupied is 20x125 feet and the cel- 
lar underneath is also used by the proprietor. 
The first year's trade amounted to about 
$2,000, while at present it aggre»ates $12,090,. 
an increase of 500 percent. The stock "car- 
ried embraces a full line of cooking and heat- 
ing stoves, tinware, house furnishing goods, 
etc., for sale at prices uniformly low and satis- 
factory. Three hands are employed and roof- 
ing, spouting and guttering and general, 
job work receive prompt attention. This 
house is the leading one in this line in thecitv 
and its trade is located throughout this and' 
adjoining counties. lie makes a specialty of 
fine parlor stoves and in consequence of 
superior advantages possessed ho is prepared- 
to offer special inducements in this line; he is 
also prepared to set up ranges as ordered.. 
Mr. Green is a native of this state and was 
born in 1S35. System and order, coupled .with,- 
prompt and polite attention and unexcep- 
tional fair dealing, has been the cause ot" bring- 
ing this house to its present prominent posi- 
tion among the business houses of Muncie. 



132 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



A. A. MILLIGAN, 

Wholisah Liquor Dkaler and Pro- 
prietor "Treuont House." 
If there is any branch of commercial pur- 
suit requiring for its successful prosecution 
more than ordinary sound judgement and dis- 
cretion, good business tact, indomitable energy, 
unswerving integrity and a strict regard to 
probity, these qualifications are peculiarly es- 
sential to the dealer in wines and liquors. 
These essential requisites are harmoniously 
blended in the person of Mr. A. A. Milligan, 
wholesale dealer in wines, liquors, cigars, to- 
bacco, etc., whose place of business is located 
on the corner ot Main and High Sts., in this 
city. Mr. Milligan is a native of Ireland but 
came to the United States when quite young, 
landing at Baltimore in 1S4S. He came direct 
to the city of Pittsburgh, Pa , where he was 
for many years prominently identified with 
the wholesale liquor trade and where he made 
hosts of good friends, in both business and 
social circles. In 1S7S he established himself 
in the same line in this city, where he now 
occupies two rooms with an aggregate floor 
space ol ^oxSo feet in dimensions and carries a 
tull and desirable stock of the choicest and 
purest brands of foreign and American wines, 
liquors, cordials, etc., bourbon and rye whis- 
kies, bottled ale, beer and porter, cigars, tobac- 
co, etc., enjoying unsurpassed facilities for 
supplying tne trade. The average valuation 
of stock carried is not less than $15,000, and 
the annual transactions of this representative 
house, which is the leading one in this line in 
Central Indiana, will exceed $45,000, the trade 
extending throughout this and adjoining coun- 
ties. Mr. Milligan's well known probity and 
uniform system of fair and honorable dealing 
ensures absolute safety to his patrons, who 
may implicitly rely upon all statements made 
by him or his employes as to quality, purity 
and value. Mr. Milligan transacts an exclu- 
sively cash business, thus protecting his pa- 
trons against possibility of being assessed to 
make up for bad debts. 



to upholstering and the manufacture of mat- 
tresses, whose excellence cannot be surpassed 
by any contemporaneous house at correspond- 
ing figures. He also carries in stock a fine 
assortment of upholstered furniture, lounges, 
mattresses, sofas, etc., and every description of 
material for promptly repairing upholstered 
furniture. The facilities he enjoys enables 
him to compete in prices in articles" in this line 
with any contemporaneous house in this part 
of the state. Mr. Ritter is a native of Ohio 
and was born in Wyandot Countv, in that 
state, in 1S59. He came to this state in 1SS0, 
and after working at his trade for about two 
years inaugurated his present successful busi- 
ness enterprise, which is entitled to liberal 
public consideration. 



J. K. RITTER, 

Manufacturer of Fine Upholstered 
Furniture, Spring Mattresses, etc., 
East Main St. 

Among those who through enterprise and 
skill have secured a promising future in 
their business and mechanical operations, both 
favorable and liberal mention is due the estab- 
lishment of Mr. J. K. Ritter, of this city. Mr. 
Ritter is a thorough artizan in the depart- 
ment to which he gives his attention, and 
though yet a comparatively young man, has 
laid the foundation for a successful business 
career. His present enterprise dates its origin 
to 18S2, since which time it has shown com- 
mendable progress in the extent of its opera- 
tions. He occupies for manufacturing and 
business purpo-es a fine business room located 
on East Main St., which is 15.XS5 feet in 
dimensions, where he gives special attention 



A. L. JOHNSON & CO. 
Hard Wood Lumber. 
The energy and ability displayed by the 
representative houses engaged "in this im- 
portant department of our commerce con- 
duces largely to the wealth, material pros- 
perity and "thrift of the progressive city of 
Muncie, which on account ot its natural ad- 
vantages as the geographical center of a fine 
timber district and its acquired facilities for 
intercommunication with the consuming cen- 
ters of the Union, has become a most desira- 
ble market and distributing point, especially 
for those varieties of hard woods indigeneous 
to this section, such as oak, ash, hickory and 
walnut. The leading house in this section 
making a specialty of buying, selling and 
manufacturing hard wood lumber is that of 

J A. L. Johnson i: Co., with offices, yards and 
mills at Muncie and a branch establishment 
at Montpelier, Blackford County, where the 
business is conducted under the same firm 
name. At the former place an average force 
of 30 workmen is employed, with a monthly 
pay roll of about $1,000, and at the latter point 
20 men with . salaries aggregating $600 per 
annum. The yards and mills at Muncie 
cover a ground space of about five acres, and 
an average stock of $500,000 feet of sawed 
lumber and 300,000 feet of round logs is car- 
ried. The mills in this city are thoroughly 
equipped, six saws now being in constant use, 
with a daily capacity of $25,000 feet, and spe- 
cial machinery has recently been introduced 
for the manufacture of round handles ofevery 
description. This representative firm trans- 
acts an annual business of fully $125,000, 
handling annually more than $5,000,000 feet of 
lumber, which is principally shipped in large 
lots to Eastern cities. They make a promi- 
nent specialty of car timber "and material, sup- 
plying several of the most important car man- 
ufacturers in the United States. Mr. A. L. 
Johnson is a native of Herkimer County, N. 
Y., though his early life was spent in Ashta- 

j bula County, O., where he was engaged in the 
milling business, and he removed to Indiana 
in 1S73, founding the present house in this 
city in 1S79. Although yet a young man, 
having been born in 1S52, he has" exhibited a 



CITY OF MUNCIE. 



133 



degree of enterprise and ability in the mar- 
agemeut of his extensive interests entitling 
him to prominent rank among the self made 
men and successful merchants of Central In- 
diana. Mr. O. M. Tyler, an accomplished 
bookkeeper and accountant, has charge of the 
office and clerical department, a position for 
which he is eminently qualified by education 
and experience. Mr.'j. C. Wood, the present 
efficient fereman of the works in this city, has 
been associated with this house for the past 
three years and is fully conversant with all 
the details of the manufacturing department. 

KIRBY HOUSE, 

J. A. Heinsohn, Owner and Proprie- 
tor, Main and Jefferson Sts. 




m 1 3 j nijiiti! r \ 



In all that pertains to a strictly first class 
hotel, the Kirbv House, of Muncie, claims 
prominent' recognition and is without excep- 
tion the finest hotel structure in the state out- 
side of Indianapolis. This model caravan- 
sery was erected in 187 1 by Mr. Thomas 
Kirbv, an old and wealthy citizen, and was 
first opened to the public by Mr. W. D.Jones, 
who conducted it but a short time, when the 
property was purchased by the present pro- 
prietor," Mr. J. A. Heinsohn, who in the spring 
of 1S82 rebuilt, enlarged and refurnished it 
entire, introducing all the modern metropoli- 
tan features and conveniences — electric bells 
and fire alarm, elegant bar and billiard par- 
lors, telephonic communication with all parts 
of the city, commodious sample rooms for the 
convenience of commercial travelers, etc. 
The building with its enlargements and im- 
provements is four stories in height and 96x1:0 
feet in dimensions, containing So commodious 
and handsomely furnished rooms with gas 
throughout. On the first floor is a large and 
conveniently arranged office, reading and 
•writing rooms, baggage and wash rooms, a 
barroom and billiard parlor, furnished in the 
most elegant and elaborate style of ornamen- 
tal wood work, plate glass mirrors, etc. The 
billiard hall proper is one of the fine>t in the 
state and contains three fine billiard and two 
pool tables of the celebrated J. M. Brunswick 
& Balke manufacture. On this floor are also 



two large sample rooms, a dining room with 
a seating capacity for 100 guests, parlors, re- 
ception and sitting rooms, kitchen, laundry 
and general culinary department. The re- 
mainder of the floors are devoted to sleeping 
apartments and guest chambers, single and en 
suite. The rates at the Kirby House have 
been fixed at the popular prices of $2.00 per 
day and the patronage is derived from the bet- 
ter classes of the traveling public. Mr. Hein- 
sohn is a German by birth but has resided in 
Indiana since 1S56. He is thoroughly con- 
versant with all the details of the hotel busi- 
ness, and as a genial and accomplished host is 
favorably known to a large circle of the travel- 
ing public throughout this section. His esti- 
mable wife is a daughter of Mr. Kirby, the 
original owner of the building. 

JOSEPH A. GODDARD, 

Wholesale Grocer, No. 90 South 
Walnut St. 

The wholesale grocery house now con- 
ducted by Mr. Joseph A. Goddard has exer- 
cised an important influence in attracting trade 
which was formerly diverted to more remote 
markets, materially contributing to the growth 
and development which during the past decade 
the city has attained in the direction of an 
inland commercial metropolis. This exten- 
sive establishment, which is the only exclu- 
sively wholesale grocery house in Delaware 
County, was founded in 1S72, and the busi- 
ness was successfully conducted until June, 
1881, by Messrs. Adamson & Goddard, when 
the present proprietor assumed its entire man- 
agement and control. The premises occu- 
pied, at No. 90 South Walnut St., embrace 
four entire floors, each 22x100 feet in dimen- 
sions, with the exception of 22x40 feet on the 
second floor, where is constantly carried a full 
and complete line of staple and fancy grocer- 
ies, te#>, tobaccos, coffees, sugars, syrups, 
canned goods and miscellaneous merchandise 
pertaining to grocery supplies, which, owing 
to the facilities enjoyed by Mr. Goddard for 
procuring his supplies direct from importers, 
jobbers, and first hands, he is enabled to offer 
trade within a radius of 100 miles at rates 
which will defy competition from similar es- 
tablishments in the metropolitan cities of the 
East or West. The valuation of stock carried 
ranges from $10,000 to $20,000, and the an- 
nual transactions of this house will exceed 
$i2vcoo, the trade being principally derived 
from the merchants of this and adjoining 
counties, who have not been slow to appre- 
ciate the advantages and avail themselves of 
the opportunity offered for repleni-hing their 
stocks at a saving of time and unnecessary 
expen>e. Mr. Goddard is a native of Ohio, 
where he was born in 1S40, but has resided in 
Indiana for the past 13 years. It is through 
the influence and exertions of such represen- 
tative merchants that the city of Muncie has 
made such rapid strides within the past few- 
years towards prominence as a commercia 
. and trade center. 



134 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



THAD. A. NEELY, 

Manufactur er of the Muncie Skate. 
In these modern days of practical utilitarian- 
ism, when almost every effort of the inventor 
is in the direction of devices for labor saving 
machinery and purely mechanical appliances, 
it is a pleasure to chronicle the success of one 
whose ingenuity and skill has been directed in 
other channels, but whose ability and useful- 
ness in his chosen field of enterprise is no less 
worthy of prominent recognition as a bene- 
factor of the human race, for the best authori- 
ties of the age hold it as an incontrovertible 
fact that the individual who caters to the inno- 
cent requirements of childhood and the 
amusements of children of a larger growth, by 
the introduction of any device whereby health 
and happiness is secured and pleasure' gained, 
is more deserving of the commendations of 
his fellow creatures than the grim student of 
philosophy, theology or medicine, however' 
scientific and full of erudition his essays and 
dissertations may be. Scarcely two decades 



rink skate in America; it is endorsed by the 
finest experts and professionals in the worlcT 
as being the finest movement In the year 
1SS0 Mr. Neely established in the city of 
Muncie a manufactory for the production of 
these skates, and although there are at the 
present time four similar works in the United 
States, he has secured a trade extending to all 
sections of this country and Europe, which 
will exceed in four-fold proportion that of any 
of his contemporaries, his annual output at 
this time being from 40,000 to 50,000 pairs, 
whicn range in price from $1 to $20, the lat- 
ter being exquisitely finished and gold mount- 
ed, suitable for prize or presentation. Mr, 
Neely occupies a two story building, 20x6o> 
feet in dimensions and furnishes employment 
to a force of about 25 mer, in what is techni- 
cally known as "assembling," or putting to- 
gether the various parts which are manufac- 
tured at other points, many nations and foreign 
lands being tributary to even so delicate a 
contrivance as this beautitul skate. Mr. Neely 



THAB.A.NEEnY'$ 




have passed since the roller skate was first 
introduced to the notice of the American pub- 
lic, and it was not until many years later that 
it became popular with the masses. In fact, 
it was not until Mr. Thad. A. Neely, of the 
city of Muncie, perfected and patented what 
is now known in America and Europe as the 
"Muncie Roller Skate" that the pastime of 
roller skating was raised to the rank of one of 
the most graceful, healthful and elegant ac- 
complishmentsof modern times and immensely 
popular with all classes of the community. 
Among the advantages claimed for this skate 
renderingi t superior to any other in use, may 
be bn'efly enumerated the following: It is the 
only adjustable bottom skate manufactured 
and can be changed from one side to another 
instantly; it is equal to four pairs of any 
other skate and has met with greater success 
than all others combined; it is the most sim- 
ple, the most durable and the only practical 



is a native and lifelong resident of Muncie, 
and to his ability, enterprise and integrity may 
be attributed the world wide reputation which 
has been attained by our beautitul inland 
metropolis within the past four years. 

JAMES CHARMAN\ 

Baker, Grocer and Confectioner r 

No. 167 South Walnut St. 
This business was originally started by Mr, 
Charman more than 33 years ago,, and he now 
holds the position of controlling one of the 
oldest business houses in the city. Since its- 
commencement this house has largely grown 
in its volume and importance, until it now 
holds a prominent position among the leading 
establishments in the department of trade its- 
stock embraces. The premises occupied for 
business purposes embrace a general sales- 
room 20x50 feet, with an additional room on 
the second floor of the same dimensions. The 



CITY OF MUNCIE. 



135 



ovens and bakery department in the rear 
occupy a space of 20x20 feet and embraces the 
most thorough and modern appliances for the 
successful prosecution of this department. 
Special attention is given to furnishing fami- 
lies and dealers with the choicest fresh bread 
rolls, pies, cakes, etc., and in addition to the 
stock carried, this house is prepared to supply 
to order fine cakes for weddings, parties or 
festival occasions upon the most liberal terms. 
The grocery and confectionery department 
embraces a full line of fine teas, coffees, spices, 
sugars, syrups, canned goods, confectionery, 
tobaccos and cigars, notions, etc. As a depot 
for general heme and table supply, its crowded 
salesroom presents a most inviting selection. 
Besides giving employment to one skilled and 
accomplished baker, he utilizes the services of 
two assistants in the sales department, while 
the annual sales will aggregate about §18,000. 
Mr. Charman is a native of England and was 
born in VVisley Farm, Surrey, in 1831. When 
quite young he came to this country, landing 
in New York City, coining direct to this state, 
where he settled "in Wayne County, and after 
about four years came to this city. At that 
time there were none of the present churches 
in the place, and where Main St. now is there 
was only a walk made of occasional stones or 
block along one side, over 30 years ago. 



HAINES & MASON, 

Feed, Grain and Ice Dealers. 
This house had its inception in 1S7S under 
the firm name of Haines jc Hoover. In 
November, 1SS2, Mr. Hoover withdrew and 
in May, 1S83, Mr. William F. Mason was ad- 
mitted into partnership. Since the last named 
date the house has been known by the above 
title; but the present individual members of 
the firm are Calvin Haines and John R. 
Mason, (a well known and extensive operator 
in grain and stocks, noticed elsewhere in this 
volume). Mr. John Mason entered this 
co-partnership in November, 1SS3, on the re- 
tirement of his son from the firm. These gen- 
tlemen are conducting a growing and pros- 
perous business, handling as they do large 
quantities of grain and feed, supplying a large 
local trade. In connection with the above a 
large ice business is done during the summer 
months. In this department they have ample 
facilities to meet the growing demand of a 
large local trade. About 1,000 tons of ice are 
disposed of annually, necessitating the em- 
ployment of three delivery wagons and two 
men. Until recently the ice trade was in the 
control of one house here, but these gentle- 
men, having ample facilities and means, have 
secured already the greater portion of the ice 
trade of Muncie. The business extends 
throughout the city and surrounding country 
and shows a steady growth. Mr. Calvin 
Haines is a native of Ohio, where he was born 
in 1S41, but has resided in this state since 
1S69. Mr. J. R. Mason is also a native of 
Ohio, born in 1S37. He has been a resident 
of this state since boyhood. 



COFFEEN MARBLE WORKS, 

H. T. C. Coffeen, Prop., North High 
Street. 

There is no more commendable feature asso- 
ciated with progressive civilization than is 
indicated in increasing respect exhibited in the 
growing tendency to mark with suitable monu- 
ment the last resting place of the bodies of 
deceased friends. As an indication ot the 
attainments in sculptured monuments and 
beautiful designs and in commemorative 
emblems we direct attention to the Cof- 
lpen Marble Works, of this city. This 
house has been in existence since 1871, at 
which time it was established by Colfeen 
Bros., who controlled the business up to No- 
vember, 1SS1, at which time the business came 
into the hands of the present proprietor. Mr. 
Coffeen occupies for business purposes a room 
20x80 feet in dimensions, besides additional 
yard room in the rear 125x125 feet, where he 
gives employment to from four to fifteen 
hands, and in addition to the preparation of 
every description of ordinary head stones he is 
prepared to execute standard or special designs 
of fine monumental work to order. In addi- 
tion to specimens always in stock he carries 
drawings of all popular styles, which he will 
execute to order upon as reasonable terms as 
any contemporaneous house in this state. He 
also carries in stock Freestone marble and 
granite and is prepared ;o furnish to order 
tablets or slabs and curbing for building pur- 
poses or contract for the execution of all work 
m this line. Among the prominent monu- 
ments erected by this house may be noted the 
Spencer Monument, at Marion, in this state, 
an elaborate construction valued at $1,500; 
also, the magnificent monument eree'eu over 
the grave of Mr. Summers, of Henry County. 
These and numerous others attest the high 
attainments in sculptured mechanism, which 
will bear favorable comparison with the finest 
works of art produced by metropolitan estab- 
lishments, while the facilities of this house will 
enable them to give liberal terms to their 
patrons. Mr. Coffeen is a native of Warren 
County, O., where he was born in 1S40. He 
has resided in this city for the past seven 
years, since which time he has been chieriy 
devoted to this department of business opera'- 
tions, handling the finest grades of both for- 
eign and American marble, granite and build- 
ing stone. 

DUNCAN WILLIAMS, 

Groceries and Provisions, 72 North 

Walnut St. 
This well known grocery and provision 
store was originally opened by Mr. B. R. 
Adamson, who controlled the b isiness until 
January, 1SS3, when he was succeeded by the 
present proprietor, Mr. Duncan Williams. 
This excellent source of home supplies is 
located at No. 72 North Walnut St., where he 
occupies a salesroom iSx6o feet in dimensions, 
with a rear room 12x12 feet for office pur- 



136 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



poses. In addition to this Mr. Williams 
utilizes a room up stairs, besides the cellar, 
each iSx6o feet in size, and a rear room 20x40 
feet for storage purposes. The ample room 
for storage and business purposes enjoyed bv 
this house will indicate its prominence among 
the commercial operations of this county and 
state. The stocks carried embrace a full line 
of home and table supplies, while special at- 
tention is paid to securing the better grades of 
goods, particularly in choicest coffees, teas, 
sugars, canned goods, etc. The stock carried 
will average $4,000, while almost dally sup- 
plies secure the newest and freshest "goods. 
The annual transactions cf this house will 
aggregate about $30,000, while its patrons 
embrace many of the leading families of this 
city and surrounding country. Two assistants 
are employed and a delivery wagon for the 
prompt delivery of goods to patrons in all 
parts of the city. Mr. Duncan Williams, the 
present proprietor of this house, is a native of 
Adams County, O., but has resided in this 
state since 1S36. He has been for many years 
engaged in agricultural pursuits, and" in his 
association with commercial life lias evinced 
that energy which has given his establishment 
a position among the leading houses of its 
class in this city and county. 



M. KUECHMAN, 

Dealer in Ptaxos and Organs and 
Musical Merchandise, No. 12S East 
Main St. 
While the classics and literature may con- 
tribute to the promotion of intelligence, it re- 
mains for musical culture to produce the 
crowning refinement which no other thesis or 
principle known to the world can secure. 
The consciousness of this fact is rapidly gain- 
ing magnitude among the American people 
and must insure to dealers a constantly grow- 
ing demand for musical instruments and musi- 
cal merchandise. The house of M. Kuech- 
man had its origin in a comparatively small 
beginning over 21 years ago, since which 
time it has kept pace v%ith the progressive 
tendency of the age, in the control of the best 
and most popular instruments known to the 
trade, and at the same time perfected such 
arrangements with manufacturers as to be 
able to supply the best toned and most dura- 
ble pianos and organs at manufacturers prices. 
Among the instrumen's which this house has 
the control of in the city may be noticed the 
New England Organ, of Bos'ton, Mass., Pack- 
ard, of Fort Wayne, and Taylor & Farley, of 
Worct-stcr, Mass. He also handles and has 
the exclusive sale of the Chase piano. This 
instrument his no p;er for purity and sweet- 
ness of tone, for durability and excellence, or 
for its volume and harmony. Mr. Kuechman 
occupies a fine business room, located at 12S 
East Main St., which is 20x60 feet in dimen- 
sions, in which he carries in stock samples of 
musical instruments and general musical mer- 
chandise, with newest as well as all popular 
standard sheet music and musical instructors, 



music stools, etc. Mr. Kuechman represents 
in the department of music the most thorough 
qualifications as an accomplished musician, 
having devoted a period of over a quarter of 
a century as an instructor. His trade in musi- 
cal instruments extends over 12 counties of 
this state, and his faci'ities enable him to offer 
inducements to purchasers which can scarcely 
be duplicated and certainly not excelled bv 
any contemporaneous establishment in the 
West. His annual transactions mav be indi- 
cated by the statement that his average sales 
of organs will reach from 100 to 150, with a 
sale of from 25 to 30 pianos, besides other 
merchandi-e carried* in stock. Mr. Kuech- 
man is a native of Hesse, Germany, where he 
was born in 1S33. In early life he became 
devoted to the scudy of music, in which his 
proficiency induced him to adopt it as a pro- 
fession, and the many years of practical ex- 
perience, both as a tea'cher and in the sale of 
instruments, eminently qualifies him as the 
best counselor for those desiring to purchase. 



HUMMEL cS: SON, 

Bakers and Confectioners, ij7 East 
Main St. 
This old established and well known house 
was opened to the public 22 years ago by the 
senior member of the present firm, who' con- 
ducted the business until one and one half 
years ago, when his son, J. R. Hummel, was 
admitted into partnership, and the firm as- 
sumed its present name and style. The busi- 
ness was small at first and embraced both gro- 
ceries and bakery. The former department, 
however, was discontinued four years ago and 
an exclusive bakery and confectionery busi- 
ness is now carried on. At the time of its in- 
ception, Mr. Hummel's trade required but six 
barrels of flour per month, now the monthly 
consumption is 100 barrels. The premises 
occupied consist of two floors each 18x92 feet^ 
in area, and in addition to the personal atten-' 
tion of both members of the firm, the services 
of two assistants are constantly required. The 
power required for the manufacture of their 
products, principally bread, crackers and cakes, 
is supplied by a gas engine, which is kept run- 
ning about eight hours dailv, at very light 
expense. The firm make a specialty of pre- 
paring fine work, in the line of pyramid and 
fancy cakes, etc., for parties, weddings or festi- 
vals. The senior member of the firm is a 
native of Wurtemburg, Germany, and was 
born in 1829. He has been a resident of this 
state tor 31 years and is a highly respected and 
universally esteemed citizen. " With an ex- 
perience that has been lifelong, both members 
have acquired a thorough knowledge of all 
the details and departments of their business 
and fully comprehend the wants of the public 
in their line. This house is not only a repre- 
sentative one in this city, but occupies a lead- 
ing position in this department in this section 
of the state, in its ability to supply, upon the 
most liberal terms, families and dealers in this 
city and surrounding country. 



CITY OF MUNCIE. 



137 



MILT THOMAS' 

One Horse Livery and Sale Stable. 








This unique title may be found on the front 
of one of the popular livery and sale stable* of 
this city, and whatever may be the modest 
pretensions of the proprietor, we take the lib- 
erty of commending it to traveling men, as it 
is known in this city as one of the most effi- 
ciently conducted establishments of the kind 
to be found in this section of the state. This 
business dates back to over a quarter of a cen- 
tury ago. The old building formerly occupied 
here having been destroyed by fire in 1SS2. the 
present commodious building was erected by 
Mr. Patterson for Mr. Thomas and completed, 
equipped and occupied December iSth, 1SS2. 
This building, situated on South Walnut St., 
is one and one-half stories in height and 
40x115 feet in dimensions, is recognized as one 
of the best constructed stables in Delaware 
County and is kept in the most perfect order. 
In a sanitary point of view, these stables are 
noted for the cleanliness which prevades every 
department. Accommodations are provided 
for 100 horses, and ample assistance is always 
provided for securing every attention to stock 
entrusted to their care. Elegant carriages and 
buggies, with first class rigs and roadsters, are 
kept for pleasure parties or funeral occasions, 
and traveling men or others are conveyed to 
distant points on reasonable terms and orders in 
person or by telephone will receive prompt 
attention. Mr. Thomas is a native of Cham- 
pagne County, O., where he was born in 1S2S. 
He has been a resident of this county since 
quite a young man and has, consequently, 
been identified with the business operations, 
growth and progressive interests of this city 
since its infancy. 



J. F. NICKEY, 

Drugs and Medicines, Books, Sta- 
tionery, Wall Paper, etc., 97 East 
Main St. 

So intimately connected with the growth, 
commercial and material prosperity of this 
city, the house now conducted by J. F. Nickey 
is entitled to special mention, not only as be- 
ing one of the oldest houses of its class in the 
city, but also among the oldest in commercial 
circles. The drug store and pharmacy of Mr. 
Nickey had its origin over a quarter of a cen- 
tury ago, the business having been originally 
started by Mr. Nickey in connection with Mr. 



William Craig, under the firm name of Craig 
& Nickey. This partnership was continued 
for a period of five years, at the expiration of 
which time Mr. Craig retired from the firm 
and the house has since been in the entire 
control of Mr. Nickey. The general sales- 
room occupied is 21 'j\qo feet in dimensions, 
while the basement and a f-econd story room 
21^x45 are used for general storage purposes. 
Keeping pace with the progressive tendency 
of the age, this house, in its fixtures and ar- 
rangement, will compare favorably with those 
of our metropolitan cities, while the stocks 
carried embrace a lull line ot.pure drugs and 
chemicals, all popular ana desirable proprie- 
tarv medicinces, perfumeries and toilet articles 
in "large variety, pure wines and liquors for 
medicinal, mechanical or sacramental pur- 
poses, paints, oils and varnishes, school and 
miscellaneous books and school children's 
complete outfit, wall and window paper, 
nctions, fancy goods, etc. The prescription 
department, "to which special attention is 
given in the preparation of physicians' pre- 
scriptions and family recipes, is conveniently 
and neatly arranged for the accurate com- 
pounding of medicines, and special care is 
exercised both in the purity of medicines and 
the accuracy with which they are prepared. 
As an indication of the growth of trade attend- 
ing this house, it may be stated that while its 
first year's business did not exceed $2,000, its 
present annual transactions will aggregate 
from $iS,coo to $25,000, giving employment 
to three assistants, members of his family, 
who are thoroughly conversant with the de- 
partments in which they are employed. Mr. 
Nickey is a native of Perry County, Pa., where 
he was born in 18:6. lie came to this state in 
1S59, since which time he has been identified 
with the progressive interests of this city. 



JACOB VOGT, 

Merchant Tailor, 14S East Main St. 
Mr. Vogt has achieved his present position 
through the force of native ability, unaided by 
the capital of others. Coming to America 
from his native country, Germany, about 10 
years ago, he established his present business 
about three years later, in which he has at- 
tained a prominent position among the estab- 
lishments of this class in this city. His shop 
and salesroom are located on East Main St., 
at No. 148, is 20x75 feet in size, and his large 
patronage necessitates the employment of 
about 10 skilled hands. He carries a full stock 
of foreign and domestic piece goods, suitings, 
etc., of the latest styles, from which patrons 
can make selections, is the finest in the 
city, and all orders left in his hands receive 
prompt attention and a guarantee of fashiona- 
ble styles, good workmanship and perfect fits. 
His suits are manufactured at prices ranging 
from $20 to $50, and his patronage comprises 
the best class of citizens in this city and 
vicinity. Mr. Vogt was born in 1S45 and is a 
practical merchant tailor of many years ex- 
perience and with the increasing tendency to 



138 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



elegant attire. His establishment is justly 
entitled to liberal consideration among the 
most thoroughly reliable merchant tailoring 
houses in Central or Eastern Indiana. 



L. R. EISENBRAND, 

Manufacturer axd Jobber of Fine 
Havana and Domestic Cigars, West 
Main St. 
Occupying a promineut position in its rela 
tion to the trade interests of this city, the 
establishment ot" L. R. Eisenbrand has secured 
a conspicuous position among the leading 
houses of the state for the manufacture of 
popular brands, which command the attention 
of dealers and consumers in various sections 
of the state. Mr. Eisenbrand commenced his 
present business in April, 1SS3, and bv the 
careful selection of stock, of which he is a 
thorough judge, and the manufacture of popu- 
lar cigars suited to the requirements of the 
trade, he has already created a demand for his 
cigars and given them a standard value and 
reputation in the market not surpassed by any. 
He gives employment to from eight to ten 
hands and turns out an average of 40,000 
cigars per month. Among the well known 
and popular brands manufactured by him we 
mention the "Bijou," a superior five cent 
cigar, "The Messenger," a five cent cigar, and 
"The Mascot," one of the finest ten cent 
cigars to be found in the market. His genera! 
office and salesroom is 20x25 feet in dimen- 
sions, while the manufacturing department in 
the rear is 22x37 ^" eet - ^ n addition to his 
stock of cigars he carries a full line of manu- 
factured tobaccos for smoking and chewing 
purposes, also a full line of smokers' articles, 
commanding the sale of staple and popular 
brands. He gives special attention to the job- 
bing of cigars and tobaccos, and the facilities 
he enjoys in this line will strongly commend 
his establishment to the trade through this 
and adjoining counties of the state. Mr. 
Eisenbrand is a native of Philadelphia, where 
he was born in 1S59. He is not only a thor- 
oughly practical cigar maker but an expert as 
a judge of leaf and manufactured tobacco, and 
his judgement in this department of trade is 
entitled to most respectful consideration. 



L. H. HARPER, 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC FRUITS, PRO- 
DUCE, Confectioneries, etc. 

Desirably located on the principal thorough- 
fare of Muncie, the house of L. II. Harper is 
worthy of special notice in a work devoted to 
the business interests of the city. The house 
was opened in 1S76 by its present proprietor, 
and its trade having gradually increased since 
the date of its inception, is now lucrative and 
satisfactory. The room occupied is on Wal- 
nut St. and is 20x40 feet in dimension-. Two 
assistants are employed. The stock carried 
comprises a full assortment of foreign and 
domestic fruits, vegetables, berries, cigars, 
tobaccos, confectioneries, oysters, fish, poultry, 



seasonable produce, etc. His goods will al- 
ways be found pure and fresh and his sales- 
room presents a neat and attractive appear- 
ance. Mr. Harper is a native of Marion 
County, O. He came to Indiana in 1S70 and 
has resided in Muncie since 1S76. His house 
is a representative one in its line. 



R. H. MONG, 

Planing Mills, Lumber, Lath, Shin- 
gles, etc, High and Howard Sts. 
The oldest dealer in lumber and manufac- 
turer of building materials in this city is Mr. 
R. H. Mong, whose yards and planing mills 
are located at the corner of Hi,ijh and Howard 
Sts, where a ground space of about 130x140 
fee\ besides about the same additional space 
in adjoining grounds, is occupied, upon which 
is erected a two story brick building 40x60 
leef and an engine and boiler house 20x24 leet 
in dimensions, while the lumber yards have 
about 450 feet of shed room. The planing 
mill is thoroughly equipped with the best 
designs of wood working machinery for 
planir.g, matching, beading, moulding, turn- 
ing, re-sawing and scroll sawing, operated by 
one 35 horse power engine and boiler. In the 
adjacent yards are stored large quantities of 
lumber, lath, shingles and building materials 
of all sizes and dimensions. Mr. Mong han- 
dles annually from Soo.ooo to r,ooo,ooo feet of 
lumber, and the average stock carried closely 
approximates 700.000 feet in the various build- 
ing material-. This house was originallv es- 
tablished in 1S74 by the firm of Mong Si Wil- 
lard, the present proprietor, assuming the 
entire control and management in 1SS1. Mr. 
Mong is a native of Warren County, O , where 
he vias bjrn in 1S21, but has resided in Mun- 
cie since 1S53 and been engaged in various 
mercantile and industrial pursuits. Prior to 
embarking in his present enterprise he was 
identified with the grocery and also with the 
grain trade. He was also engaged in the pork 
pac&ing business and later in an iron foundry 
and machine shop. Since 1S6S he has devoted 
his attention exclusively to the lumber trade 
and e-tabli-hed a lucrative and prosperous 
bu-ine-s. 



C. P. FRANKLIX, 

Groceries, South Walnut St. 
Of the industries in this county worthy of 
special mention and one in which there is 
probably as much capital invested as in any 
counh having the same population, the retail 
grocery bu-iucss is probably the leading one, 
excepting the manufacturing interests, and 
will equal in extent and variety of goods dealt 
in a great many ot our large and more popu- 
lous counties. Prominent among these is the 
establishment of C. P. Franklin," located' in the 
Senate Block, South Walnut St., Muncie. 
Although not one of the pioneer industries, it 
is one ct th.- largest and tno>t enterprising. 
Mr. Franklin took possession of the house in 
July, 1SS3, and was successor to the firm of 



CITY OF MUNC1E. 



139 



"Maddy Bros., who had been 12 years estab- 
lished at this location. Two floors are utilized 
30x60 and 20x30 feet respectively. The stock 
•carried is full and complete, embracing 
the best standard goods, comprising 
-full lines of staple and fancy groceries, to- 
gether with country produce, provisions, etc., 
fresh from surrounding towns. The trade is 
strictly local and he is. perhaps, enjoying the 
largest trade of any similar house in Muncie 
and steadily increasing from year to year. 
Mr. Franklin is yet a young man, a native of 
•this state, where he was born in 1859. As 
may be inferred from the above facts, the 
house of C. P. Franklin ranks among the 
most solid and reliable grocery establishments 
-of Muncie. 

KLOPFER & BRO.. 

Manufacturers of Bottled Soda and 
Mineral Water, Jefferson St. 
This enterprise is carried on by gentlemen 
■who, with long practical experience and skill 
in this line, have acquired a reputation for the 
manufacture of mineral waters and other de- 
licious beverages not enjoyed by any other 
manufacturers of these goods in this section of 
the state. Their establishment is the onlv one 
-of the kind in the county, and consequently 
enjoys a lucrative patronage. Among the 
articles manufactured we mav mention min- 
eral waters, ginger ale, champaigne cider, pop, 
soda water, etc.; soda fountains charged. Two 
boys are employed and one team is utilized 
for delivery purposes; and they do a large 
business during the summer months. Martin 
Klopfer has the management of this house 
principally, the brother. Fred. Klopfer, being 
extensively engaged in the manufacture of 
carriages, an editorial notice of which will be 
found elsewhere in these pages. Both are 
natives of Germany. The members of this 
house are reliable and energetic business men 
and have built up their trade by force of their 
own sagacity and progressive ideas of business. 



W. R. SMITH, 

Marble and Monumental Works, 
East of Kirby House, Main St. 
The establishment of Mr. W. R. Smith, 
-whose artistic skill in this department will 
compare favorably with any contemporaneous 
house in the state, is entitled to liberal con- 
sideration in this review. This house had its 
origin in this city over 16. years ago, and the 
cemeteries of this and adjoining counties bear 
numerous testimonial to the superior work- 
manship and artistic ability manifested bv this 
house in monuments of marble and granite, 
headstones, etc. No: only in the execution of 
both standard and special designs, but also in 
the facilities enjoyed by this house for the 
prompt and economical execution of all orders, 
is it entitled to the highest public considera- 
tion in its ability to compete with any similar 
establishment in the state. The buildings and 
ground space occupied for work and the 



display of standard designs of finished work 
always on exhibition, is 125x125 feet in dimen- 
sions. Mr. Smith is prepared not only to exe- 
cute all orders in fine monumental "work in 
foreign or American marble, granite or lime- 
stone, but also to execute every description of 
cemetery work in vaults, curbing, flagging, 
etc. Mr. W. R. Smith is a native of this stale 
and was born in Fayette Countv in 1S22. He 
came to this city in i860 but has been a citi- 
zen of this county since 1S44. He has always 
exhibited an active interest in civil and politi- 
cal affairs, giving encourage-nent to all legiti- 
mate enterprises which gave promise of the 
promotion of the public welfare. As an indi- 
cation of the esteem in which he is held by 
his fellow citizens, we notice that in 1866 
he was elected to the office of Sheriff of Dela- 
ware County, a position which he efficiently 
and satisfactorily filled to the satisfaction of 
his constituents. 



H. SILVERBURG, 

Merchant Tailor, East Main St. 
In recording a correct statement of the indus- 
tries of this county, the house controlled by 
Mr. Silverburg is deserving of special men- 
tion, from the fact that it is reliable, well estab- 
lished and now in the eighth year of successful 
business. He occupies a room 20x70 feet in 
size, at the corner of East Main and Mulberry 
Sts., and carries a fine assortment of Ameri- 
can and foreign piece goods in all varieties to 
suit the trade. He employs an average of 
four hands and all orders left in his hands are 
promptly attended to. He turns out neatly 
fitting and durably made suits at prices aver- 
aging from $25 to $45, and being one of the 
best cutters in the county and using none but 
the very best of material, his goods never fail 
to give entire satisfaction. Mr. Silverburg is 
a native of Poland and was born in 1S31. He 
has been a resident of this slate for the past 
nine years. He learned the trade in his native 
country and has made the business his life's 
work. 



MUNCIE MILLS, 

Flour, Grain, etc.; Wysor, Kline & 

Co., Propr's. 
These mills, which are widely known for 
their superior products, were originally erected 
in 1S55 by Messre. Wysor & Jack and oper- 
ated by them until 1S5S, when the firm name 
and style became Wysor, Jack & Co., by the 
admission of Mr. Kline. In the following 
year Mr. Jack died and the firm became 
Wysor & Kline, the interest of Mr. Jack being 
rented by them, continuing as such until 1S74, 
when M"r. Wallace Hibbits was admitted to 
the firm by the purchase of the interest of 
Mrs. Jack, the style becoming as at present. 
The mill proper, which is four and one-half 
stories in height, covers a ground space of 
61x62 feet. In 1SS2 it was thoroughly re- 
modeled and enlarged and the improved roller 
system adopted, it now has six double set of 



140 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



rolls and three run of stones, with a capacity 
for turning out 200 barrels of flour every 24 
hours. The machinery is of the latest im- 
proved varieties and is propelled by water 
from the White River, the wheel being equiva- 
lent to zoo horse power, and in addition to 
this is a steam engine and boiler of the same 
power, which is utilized when the water is 
low and is also used for hoisting grain at the 
large elevator, about 550 feet east of the mill, 
connected by wire rope, used in connection 
with the mill and for the storage of wheat 
and corn for shipment to the seaboard cities, 
this firm shipping annually from 50,000 to 
60,000 bushels of grain. The elevator has a 
storage capacitv for 25,000 bushels at one time. 
The products of the mill meet with a ready 
sale throughout this and adjoining counties 
and only the very finest grades of wheat are 
used, the common grade being shipped East. 
Messrs. Wysor & Kline, in addition to their 
interests in the mill and elevator, are also ex- 
tensively engaged in agricultural pursuits, 
their farms being among the finest in this sec- 
tion and under a high state of cultivation. 



CHARLES S. HOOVER, 

Cigars, Tobaccos, etc., No. 149 East 

Main- St. 
This house was established in 1SS0 by Mr. 
Fred. Moore, being succeeded by Mr. Hoover 
in March, 1SS3, who has established a com- 
manding trade in tobaccos, cigars and smok- 
ers' articles. His salesroom is 16x60 feet in 
dimensions and is most elegantly and elabo- 
rately equipped, and will compare favorably 
with the best metropolitan establishment of 
its class. Five silver mounted cases give to 
the room a metropolitan appearance. The 
stock, carried comprises all the best and most 
desirable brands of Havana and domestic 
cigars and tobaccos, together with a full line 
of smokers' articles and other goods usually 
found in a first ciass establishment of this 
kind. Mr. Hoover is a native of this county 
and was born in 1S59. He is a young man of 
thorough business ability and has by his own 
energy and enterprise secured a leading posi- 
tion in his present department of trade. 



M. G. MOCK, 

New and Second Hand Furniture, 
Musical Instruments and Miscel- 
laneous Merchandise, 470 and 476 
South Walnut St. 
This popular house was established in No- 
vember, 1S77, by Mr. Mock, with a cash capi- 
tal of only $60, but such judicious use has 
been made of his opportunities that the valua- 
tion of his stock at the present time will 
exceed $3,500 and his annual transactions 
range from $10,000 to $15,000. To attempt 
an enumeration ot the great variety of articles 
comprised in the comprehensive stock would 
require far more space than can be allotted in 
the present volume, but a few of the more 
important may be mentioned in this connec- 



tion: A full and complete assortment of new 
and second hand furniture, musical instru- 
ments, cooking and heating stoves, carpets, 
crockery and glassware, lamps, watches,, 
clocks, jewelry, sewing machines, notions,, 
fancy goods, etc. In short, from Mr. Mock's 
extensive stock any family can procure a 
complete house furnishing outfit, including 
kitchen, dining room, parlor and chamber 
suits, with all the various appurtenances re- 
quired in a well regulated household, at much 
lower rates than at any similar establishment 
in the state. P'or the storage and display of 
this unique and extensive stock three floors, 
each 36x105 feet in dimensions, are required 
and are filled to their utmost capacity. This 
is the oniy establishment of its class in the 
city, and the trade is not only of a local char- 
acter but extends over a wide area of adjacent 
territory. Mr. Mock is a native and lifelong 
resident of Delaware County and was born in 
1S4S. He has by his own unaided efforts and 
enterprise succeeded in building up a large 
and steadily increasing trade, and by the exer- 
cise of a uniformly honorable method of deal- 
ing with his patrons, secured the confidence 
of those with whom he has established busi- 
ness relations. 



FRED. KLOPFER, 

Carriage Manufacturer, Cor. East 

Main and Jefferson Sts. 
The enterprising establishment of Mr. Fred. 
Klopfer has kept pace with the march of pro- 
gress and now occupies a leading position in 
its department, controlling the most complete 
and best equipped carriage manufactory in this 
county. Mr. Klopfer is a practical carriage 
builder of long experience and was formerly 
identified with the firm of Bower Sc Klopfer. 
In 1S81 he withdrew from the firm snd estab- 
lished himself at his present location, at the 
corner of Main and Jefferson Sts. The premi- 
ses here occupied embrace a substantial brick 
building 24x115 feet in dimensions and consist 
of three floors for the finishing and storage of 
finished work, kept constantly in stock. Fif- 
teen skilled hands areemployed in the various 
departments, while it is the fixed policy of this 
house to turn out none but first class work 
from the best material. The facilities en- 
joyed by this house for the supply of reliable 
and finely finished work are not surpassed by 
any contemporaneous establishment in the 
West. He also gives special attention to re- 
pairing, both in wood work and iron depart- 
ments, painting, trimming, etc. Carriages,, 
buggies, spring wagons and sleighs to the 
number of about 125 are turned out annually 
and a ready market is found for them through- 
out this and adjoining counties. Mr. Klopter 
is a native of Germany and was born in 1S47. 
He emigrated to America 17 years ago and 
has resided in this state ten years. In addi- 
tion to the large business, of which this is a 
necessarily brief description, he holds an inter- 
est in other commercial enterprises, noticed 
elsewhere in this work. 



CITY OF MUNCIE. 



141 



J. K. MILLER, 

Coal, Wood, Lime, Cement, Feed, 
Plaster, etc., South Walnut St., 
Opp. Presbyterian Church. 
The business in which Mr. Miller is engaged 
was inaugurated by him in 1SS2. Starting 
without a dollar of capital and taking a busi- 
ness which had entirely run down, he has 
established his present business by his own 
energy and enterprise, paying every bi'l 
promptly when due. He now enjoys a trade 
embracing in its transactions n<~>t only the city 
but also a wide extent of country trade through 
this and other counties. Mr. Miller occupies 
for business purposes an office and ground 
space of 4OXS0 feet, situated near the corner of 
Charles and Walnut Sts. and fronting both 
streets, where he carries in stock the best hard 
and soft coal, lime, cement, plaster, plasterers' 
hair, feed, etc. He also carries on a wood 
yard, in which he is prepared to supply the 
best v.xrieties in large or small quantities to 
order. He handles annually about 75 car 
loads of coal, about 300 cords of wood and 
about 30 car loads of lime, delivering to any 
part of the city, in which he gives employ- 
ment to two teams and from two to four as- 
sistants during the busy season. The advan- 
tages possessed by Mr. Miller in procuring his 
supplies from the most favorable sources ena- 
bles him to compete with any contempora- 
neous house in this section of the state. Mr. 
Miller is a native of Tioga County, Pa., where 
he was born in 1847, but has resided in this 
state since 1851. During the rebellion he 
enlisted, in August, 1S63, in the 7th Indiana 
Cavalry and participated for three years in the 
important battles, marches and bivouacs inci- 
dent to those storm v times, which will mark 
the pages of history for unnumbered ages. 
His regiment was sent to Texas in 1S65, where 
it was continued in service until the following 
year, when it was mustered out at Austin, in 
1866, and he subsequently received his hon- 
orable discharge. Since 1S67 Mr. Miller has 
resided in this city and been intimately identi- 
fied with its trade and business operations. 



C. STUCKY, 

Tanner and Dealer in Hides and 
Leather, etc., West Side Public 
Square. 
Extensively engaged in the manufacture 
and sale of this important factor of our na- 
tional resources and domestic economy, is Mr. 
C. Stucky, whose salesroom and warehouse 
is located on the west side of the Public 
Square. This house was established by Mr. 
Stucky more than 30 years ago and its growth 
and progress has more than kept pace with 
the city's onward march during the past three 
decades. Mr. Stucky owns and operates a 
tannery ?n connection with his sales depart- 
ment, from which he turns out large quanti- 
ties of leather for a variety of purposes, with a 
trade extending over a wide area of territory. 
His yards have a capacity for about 50 hides 



per week and the average output is from 20 to 
30. The tannery proper is under the imme- 
diate supervision of Mr. J. P. Weis>e, as fore- 
man, in which capacity he has acted for more 
than 20 years. Mr. Stucky occupies at his 
salesroom two entire floors, "each 2o\So feet in 
I dimensions, where he carries a full stock of 
harness, saddle, shoe and sole leather, finding*, 
etc., and is prepared to pay the highest ruling 
rates for hides and leather in the rough. Mr. 
Stucky. who is a native of France, came to 
the United States in 1S50, landing at New 
York City with only four five-franc pieces in 
his pocket. With a stout heart, willing hands 
and a determination to achieve success in our 
American Republic, he commenced at the 
bottom of the ladder and now, with a flourish- 
ing business and a handsome competency, he 
can point with commendable pride to the fine 
three story brick building which he owns ar.d 
occupies, to his prosperous trade connections- 
and his honorable record as a business man 
and claim recognition among the representa- 
tive self made merchants of the present age. 

WEAVER & VAUGHN, 

Glass and Queensware and Grocer- 
ies, South Walnut St. 
One of the noted business houses of Mun- 
cie is the glass and queensware and grocery 
establishment managed by Hannah Weaver 
and Julia A. Vaughn, under the firm name of 
Weaver & Vaughn. Their house was opened 
to the public one year ago, and the industry of 
the firm has been rewarded by a gradually in- 
creasing trade. The establishment comprises 
two departments of trade. In the glass and 
queensware department is exhibited a well 
assorted stock, varied and comprehensive 
enough to meet the wants of a growing city 
and country trade. In the grocery depart- 
ment is kept constantly on hand a choice 
stock, consisting of staple and fancy groceries, 
teas, coffees, sugars, syrups, canned goods, 
provisions and fresh country produce. Their 
trade is principally local, extending over the 
city and its immediate surroundings. Their 
stock is carefully and judiciously selected and 
contains nothing of an inferior" nature, while 
their prices are uniform and satisfactory. 
Hannah Weaver and Julia A. Vaughn are 
both natives of this state. They possess good 
mercantile attainments and enjoy the confi- 
dence and esteem of the entire communitv. 



N. H. LONG, 

(Patentee Eureka Rain Water Fil- 

terer), Manufacturer and Dealer 

in Specialties. 

[This firm has its headquarters at Fostor'a, 

O., where all communications in the future 

will receive prompt attention.] 

It is an established fact that water in its 
natural state, whether subterranean, terrestrial 
or atmospheric, contains certain impurities- 
which renders it to a certain extent unfit tor 
use as a beverage or for domestic purposes 



142 



STATE OF INDIANA. 






-without undergoing a process of purification 
■either by nature's great cleansing agent or by 
artificial means. It is now believed that the 
nearest approach to perfection in a water filter 
.has been reached in the Eureka Rain Water 
Filter, the invention of Mr. N. H. Long, of 
Muncie, Ind., which has been thoroughly 
tested and endorsed by a large number of our 
most prominent citizens, professional gentle- 
men and business men. Mr. Long is a practi- 
cal inventor, who has secured numerous 
patents on useful inventions, among which 
may be mentioned an automatic gate opener 
and closer, folding and ironing table, stove 
lifter and various labor saving devices. He 
proposes to devote his exclusive attention to 
the manufacture of the Eureka Water Filter 
and other new and valuable inventions and 
push the business to its fullest extent, at Fos- 
toria, O., to where he has recently moved. 
The inventive genius he has shown, coupled 
with mechanical skill and business enterprise, 
justly entitles him to the full and liberal notice 
here accorded. 



the whole being in the shape of the letter L 
and from two to three stories in height. It is 
equipped with four runs of stone, two sets of 
rolls and all the necessary machinery for the 
manufacture of the finest grades of Hour. A 
35 horse power engine supplies the motive 
power and the entire capacity of the mill is 
about 75 barrels in 24 hours. Both custom 
and merchant work is done and his products 
meet with a ready sale throughout Muncie and 
adjoining towns. Mr. Wilcoxon was born in 
Ohio in 1S21 but is an old resident of this 
town. He has been closely identified with 
the growth and development of the city of his 
adoption and is at present serving as Treas- 
urer of the Board of School Trustees. With 
sufficient capital for his wants, an ample stock 
and trade appliances, Mr. Wilcoxon's perma- 
nent success in business is fully secured for 
the future. 



M, ROSENBUSH, 
East Main St. 
With the growth of Muncie in commerce, 
population and wealth, there is a perceptable 
growth of culture, taste and refinement as is 
■demonstrated by the numerous well patronized 
merchant tailoring establishments, many of 
them noted for their fashionable and artistic 
wrok, among which we notice the well known 
house of M. Rosenbush. This house had its 
inception in August, 1SS2. Althoughyoung in 
j*ears, it has secured a permanent and prosper- 
ous trade, derived from the better classes. 
About five hands are constantly employed. 
The stock carried is well selected to meet the 
wants of the trade in this section, comprising 
as it does the most fashionable suitings, vest- 
ings and piece goods from foreign and domes- 
tic looms, giving the customers, rich or poor, 
a choice selection to choose from, with prices 
ranging from $iS to $45 per suit. Mr. Rosen- 
bush has followed this branch of business all 
.his life, learning the trade in Germany, where 
he was born. Being an expert cutter and 
titter, he is enabled to guarantee perfect fits 
and satisfaction in all that pertains to a well 
made and fashionable suit of clothes. 

L. WILCOXON, 

Wholesale and Retail Manufactur- 
er and Dealer in - Flour, Feed and 
Grain, 712 South Walnut St. 
We have had occasion frequently in exam- 
ining the industries anil resources of this sec- 
tion of the state to note various flouring mill? 
and grain establishments, anJ prominent in 
this direction is the establishment of L. Wil- 
coxon, of Muncie. He began business as a 
•dealer in grain about 30 years ago and became 
identified with the milling business five years 
.later. His mill has a frontage of 60 feet on 
Main St. and 70 feet on the Bee Line R. R., 



WACHTELL & TYXER, 

Harness, Saddles, etc., 64 East Main 
and 30 North High Sts. 
These enterprising gentlemen control two 
harness and saddlery establishments in this 
city, one at No. 64 East Main St., the other at 
No. 30 North High St. The one located on 
I Main St. is under the management of Mr. 
I Wachtell and is a model establishment in 
! every respect. It was established in 1S66 by 
John Brady. Later in the history of the house 
I the business was controlled by J- A. Ilusted, 
I the present firm taking possession in 1SS1. 
Five workmen are at present employed in the 
i establishment and an annual business of $15,- 
000 is transacted. A salesroom and workshop 
l 22x50 and 20x30 feet in dimensions respect- 
; ive! y are utilized and a stock valued at from 
I $3,000 to $4,000 is kept on hand. Mr. Wach- 
1 teil is a practical harness maker and his goods 
i are noted for their uniform reliability, elegance 
of finish and substantial nature. He is a 
j native of Clark County but came to this city 
when but two years of age. He has always 
taken an active part in the growth and devel- 
opment of Muncie, having filled the office of 
City Clerk in an efficient and satisfactory 
manner for a period of nine years. 

MADDY HOUSE, 
J. A. Maddy, Prop. 
This hotel was opened to the public in 1SS2 
by its present proprietor and is noted for its 
j good and reasonable accommodations and 
homelike comforts. It is a substantial struc- 
ture 60x60 feet in dimensions. On the ground 
floor an area of 22x60 feet is devoted to office 
and dining room and on the second lloor are 
a number of comfortably furnished sleeping 
apartments. The building contains about 15 
rooms and ^z, guests can be conveniently 
accommodated. The house is at present 
patronized by about 15 regular boarders and 
by an average of from 20 to 30 table boarders, 
all of whom speak in the highest terms of the 
accommodations received. As manv as 200 



CITY OF MUNCIE. 



143 



people have been fed at the Maddv House in a 
single day. Seven assistants are employed, 
and in addition to everything being kept in 
first class order, every guest receives prompt 
and courteous attention. Mr. Maddy is a 
native of Monroe County, W. Va. He came 
to Indiana in 1S32 and to Muncie in 1834; not 
more than about six of the present inhabitants 
of Muncie were here at that date. He served 
as County Recorder for 11 years and was 
Deputy Clerk for some time. In 1S3S he was 
■elected County Treasurer, or "Tax Collector," 
as it was then called, the Collector being 
obliged to ride over the county, usually on 
horseback, to make the collections. He has 
also been prominently engaged in mercantile 
pursuits. He is known, all over this county as 
one of Muncie's respected pioneers. 



.BRATTON & SHIDELER, 
Dry Goods and Notions. 
Among the most prominent houses in the 
•mercantile line in Muncie and in a- leading 
place among the list of dry goods dealers in 
this section, is the establishment of Bratton & 
Shideler, successors to Stephenson & Shideler 
and B. F. Bratton. Their handsome and ele- 
gantly stocked store is 22x65 feet in dimen- 
sions and two floors are used. Their. large 
trade necessitates the employment of eight 
competent assistants, in addition to the per- 
sonal attention of both members of the firm. 
The stock carried is full and complete, com- 
prising every new and desirable article in their 
line, and buying all their goods from first 
hands and for cash, they are prepared to give 
to their customers all "the inducements to be 
-derived from these and other superior advanta- 
ges possessed by the firm. Benjamin F. Brat 
ton and Arthur L. Shideler are the individual 
members of the firm. Mr. Bratton is a native 
of the State of Delaware but has resided in 
Indiana since he was five years of age. Mr. 
S. Shideler is a native and lifelong resident of 
this state. They are specially prominent 
among Muncie's most progressive and reliable 
dry goods merchants. 

HENRY SNYDER & SON, 
Coopers. 
This now important industry had its incep- 
tion more than a quarter of" a century ago, 
when the senior member of the firm com- 
menced business on a comparatively small 
scale, and each year has witnessed a steady 
and gratifying growth. In 1S76 the present 
partnership was formed by the admission of 
Mr. John M. Snyder to an interest in the busi- 
ness. Mr. Henry Snyder died in iSjGbutthe 
business has been conducted under the same 
firm name by his sons, under the management 
of John M. Snyder. The works and grounds 
cover an area of about half an acre, upon 
which are erected four commodious buildings, 
equipped with the best and most approved 
-designs of wood working machinery especially 
.adapted to the manufacture of staves, head- 



ings, etc., propelled by one 45 horse power 
engine and boiler. From 18 to 25 hands, 
most of them skilled workmen, find perma- 
nent employment at these works, the average 
output of wnich is about 600 finished barrels 
and tierces per week. The principal products 
of the factory are barrels for flour, egg-, pork 
and poultry, which meet with a ready demand 
in this city, New Castle and surrounding 
towns. They also manufacture upon quite an 
extensive scale and ship to points East and 
West staves aud headings, employing only 
the best materials, which are procured in lnrge 
quantities from the extensive forests of Cen- 
tral Indiana. This is the principal establish- 
ment of its class in Delaware Countv and a 
large stock of manufactured staves and head- 
ings are constantly kept on hand. Mr. John 
M. Snyder is a native of Miama County, O., 
and removed to Indiana in 1S52. 



GEORGE ZUBER, 

Merchant Tailor, East Main St., 

Patterson Block. 
Mr. George Zuber is the ban ton tailor of 
Muncie. He established his business here in 
iSSo, having in that year succeeded Joe. Har- 
rick He is a merchant tailor of 30 years 
practical experience and can guarantee satis- 
faction in every particular. It is universally 
conceded that clothing made to fit nobody in 
particular never fit anybody well; the thought- 
ful citizen always gives his patronage to some 
reliable merchant tailor. Mr. Zuber has 
largely increased his trade since the year in 
which he assumed control of it and he gives 
steady employment to eight skilled hands. 
The room occupied at the above named loca- 
tion is 20x35 feet in dimensions, and here will 
always be found a fine assortment of foreign 
and "domestic piece goods from which to 
select. 1 le manufactures suits at prices ranging 
from $25 to $55 and all orders left in his 
hands receive prompt attention. Mr. Zuber 
is a native of Baden, Germany, where he 
was born in 1S42. He has resided in this 
state seven years and has won the esteem 
and confidence of the entire community. 
Promptness, reliability and thorough honesty 
are among his predominant characteristics. 



J. R. MASON, 

Dealer in Grain, Seeds and Stock, 
Cor. Walnut and Jackson Srs. 
The trade done in grain, seeds and stock 
and the many interests involved in the busi- 
ness, engages a large amount of labor and 
capital and exerts such an influence upon the 
industries of the community as to demand 
more than a casual mention. Mr. J. R. 
Mason has been closely identified with this 
business for more than a quarter oi* a century 
and has followed the business in his own in- 
terest for the past 17 years. He handles an 
average of about 30,000 bushels of grain an- 
nually, including flax seed, for all of which 
he finds prompt and marginal sales in Eastern 



144 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



markets. He utilizes two storage or ware- 
rooms, :14x3s and 30x30 feet in dimensions 
respectively, th ; s affording him ample facili- 
ties for the storage of 7,000 bushels of grain. 
In addition to this he makes large shipments 
of fat cattle and hogs to Eastern cities in 
which department of his bu-iriL>- he has been 
eminently successful. He is also a member of 
the firm of Haines & Mason, noticed else- 
where. Mr. Ma>on is a native of Ohio. He 
has held prominent positions of honor and 
trust and is now serving his second term as 
Township Trustee. 



J. A. SHEPERD, 

Dry Goods and Groceries, East 

Main St. 
This well known establishment had its in- 
ception in 1S73. Under the judicious man- 
agement of Mr. J . A. Sheperd, its founder and 
present proprietor, the house has always main- 
tained a high reputation. It enjoys a large 
city and country trade that is permanent and 
lucrative. Two departments of trade are here 
consolidated under one management, viz., dry 
goods and groceries. Both departments are 
well represented. In the dry goods depart- 
ment the stock embraces full lines of foreign 
and domestic dry goods, comprising latest 
fabrics, new and stylish novelties in full and 
comprehensive styles and varieties. The 
grocery department is equally noticeable in its 
well selected stock, full and complete, com- 
prising as it does staple and fancy goods of 
every description, especially adapted to supply 
the wants of a prosperous city and country 
trade. The annual business is not less than 
$25,000, with a gradual increase from year to 
year. This establishment will rank'promi- 
ment with any of its contemporaries. Its 
founder is a native of this state, where he was 
born in 1S43. His past business career has 
secured for him a large share of public confi- 
dence. 



A. R. COLEMAN, 

Heading, Lumber, etc. 
Among the most prominent establishments 
in the wood working line is the heading manu- 
factory now conducted by Mr. A. R. Cole- 
man, which was founded in June, 1SS0, by the 
firm of Alfrev & Coleman and passed into 
the possession of the present proprietor in 
1SS1. Mr. Coleman uses exclusively for head- 
ings the best qualities of white and burr oak, 
procuring his supplies by the purchase of 



standing timber in large lots and supplying a.* 
large number of men and teams to prepare it 
for factory use. He also purchases trom differ- 
ent sections of the state prepared holts in car- 
load lots. The grounds in this city occupied 
for manufacturing and storage purposes cover 
an area of about five acres and the mill has a 
dailv capacity for turning out 7,000 heads, or 
an average ot more than 2,500,0^0 per annum. 
The stock produced here meets with a ready 
demand in various sections of the Union, the 
heads fo'- oil barrels being contracted for in 
advance by the Standard Oil Company. lie- 
also ships large quantities to Michigan City 
and other points East and West. The ma- 
chinery employed in the manufacturing 
department is propelled by one 40 horse 
power engine and boiler and an average force 
of about 50 men is employed and from 30 to 
40 team*. Mr. Coleman carries constantly in 
stock at his yards large numbers of completed 
heads, enabling him to fill orders promptly 
for any desired quantities, more than 2,000,000 
at the present time being stored at his capa- 
cious grounds. Mr. Coleman is a native of" 
and formerly resided in Steuben County, N. 
Y. He became a resident of Indianapolis in 
1SS0 and removed to Muncie in April of the 
following year. 

The more important houses not previously- 
mentioned are the following: 

Dry Goons, Groceries, Boots and- 
Shoes, Hardware and Tinware, Drugs 
and Books: — F. M. Brown, Wachtell & 
March. E. Dungan, T. B. Snell, J. Wachtell 
& Co., Greer & Wilkinson, W. Lynn & Son r 
Howe & Little, Putnam & Kirby, L. & C. A. 
Schick, W. W. Shirk, D. S. Huffer, H. C. 
Nicholls, G. H. Andrews, C S. Chambers, C- 
M. Kimbrough, A. E. Lyman. 

Miscellaneous:— P. H. Bandy, Planing 
mill; C. Gass, carriages; J. W. Little, feather 
dusters, W. P. Howell, wagons; J. R. Ervirs, 
liquors; G. P. Maxwell, cigars; J. E. Banta Sc 
Co., candies; A. C Ireland, millinery; Desser 
& Dean, carriages; J. A. Hill, hats; R. B. 
Bradbury, coal ; J. M.Long, agricultural im- 
plements; G. W. Bower, carriages; Topp & 
Willson, meats; Long & Colling, livery ; Eph. 
Smell, pumps; J. V. Cassady, china ware, P. 
C. Hopkins & Co., meats; J. W. Perkins, 
printer; Tremont House, near depot; H. L_ 
Robbins, photos; Boyce & Bufkin, agricultu- 
ral implements; Wysor, Haines & Co., foundry 
and machine shop. 



Randolph County. 



The reflections incident to the primitive 
«<lay3 when industrial avocations had their 
"birth with the echo of the woodman's axe 
•can give but a faint realization of the 
■toih and privations which have given rise 
to the present population, wealth and lux- 
mry. With the exception, perhaps, of 
rstraggling soldiers the first white settlers 
iknown to have visited the territory now 
•composing Randolph County, was Thomas 
IParker, wife and three children, accom- 
panied by five other families from North 
-Carolina in 1814, two years prior to the 
admission of the state into the Union. 
Mr. Parker, therefore, is recognized as the 
builder of the.flrst cabin. Some of those 
who came at this time settled in the cen- 
tral portion of the county, among whom 
we mention, John W. Thomas and Clark- 
;Son Willcutts. Ephram Brown also came 
^October 22, 1814, Ephram Overman in 
^November of the same year, and among 
.those who shortly followed were James 
<Cammack, Eli Overman and Jesse Small. 
In 1815 there came David Bowls, Jesse 
Johnson, James Frazier, Mr. Hodson, 
•Obadiah Smith, and others; thus forming 
the connections of the subsequent flour- 
ishing settlements, towns and cities. 

Randolph County was organized in 
1818, at which time there were settle- 
ments at Nolan's Fork, Green's Forjc, 
Martindale Creek, West River, White 
River, and a few other localities. The 
name given to the county was by settlers, 
who were largely from Randolph County, 
N. C. The first settlement of the county 
treasurer, May, 1819, showed receipts 
$20 and disbursements the same. The 
first regular election held was in 1818, at 
which time the total vote of the county 
was about 200. The first white person 
born in the county was Robert Thomas, 
December, 1814, son of John W. Thomas, 
and the second person was Thomas Will- 
-cutts, son of Clarkson Willcutts, Febru- 
ary 14, 1815. 

The first townships were Green's Fork 
iand White River, in 1818 these embraced 



the entire territory of the county at that 
time. The first road opened through the 
entire county was in 1817, known as the 
Quaker trace, from Richmond to Ft. 
Wayne, which was subsequently the first 
post road. The road from Winchester to 
Lynn was opened in 1819. The first 
Justice of the Peace was John Lynn, 
who officiated at the first wedding Feb- 
ruary, 1819, the marriage license issued 
by Chas. Conway, clerk, to Jacob Wright 
and Sally Wright, February 2d, 1*19. 
The first licensed store in the'countv was 
opened by Wm. Connor, November, 1*18, 
two or three miles west of Old Snow Hill, 
Washington Township. The first meet- 
ing house was the Friends at Arba, 1*15. 
and the first school was held by Eli Over- 
man during the winter of l>lo and 1*16. 
The first couuty officers elected were Wm. 
Edwards and John U right, Associate 
Judges; Chas. Conway, Clerk and Re- 
corder; David Wright, Sheriff; Solomon 
Wright, Coroner; Eli Overman, Benj. 
Cox and John James, Commissioners. 
The first attorney to practice law was 
James Rariden, who was also first prose- 
cuting attorney. The building of the 
first court house was let to Abner Over- 
man, for 8254.50, December 6, ISIS, and 
the first Jail to Abner Bauta, same date, 
both accepted October 6, 1 -20. The first 
| railroad was the Indianapolis and Belle- 
j fountaine, (now Bee Line), completed in 
I 1S52-3. The first cooking stove brought 
to this county was by Edward Edger,"of 
Deerfield, in 1*3$. It cost at that time 
850 in silver, which was then at 10 per 
cent, premium. The first drain tile made 
in this county, also first in the state, was 
made by John K. Martin in 1 >5C>. 

The present townships are White River, 
| Green's Fork, Wayne, Ward, Stony Creek, 
Washington, West River, Jackson, Green, 
Nettle Creek, Monroe and Franklin. 

The county is well supplied with water 
power, the streams which traverse it bein^ 
the Mississinnewa River, White River and 
Cabin Creek. 



WINCHESTER. 



From the trackless forests of little over 
half a century ago we find a busy and 
thriving city with palatial public build- 
ings, fine business houses and private resi- 
dences, many of which would do credit 
to our metropolitan cities. The town was 
laid out into lots in November, 1818, and 
the first sale of lots was held in February, 
1819— Mr. Paul Way, surveyor; this 
place having been chosen as the seat of 
justice for this county for all white in- 
habitants north to the state line. In 1820 
there had been seven buildings erected, 
and even up to 1830 there were not more 
than twelve or fourteen buildings in the 
place and there was more woods than 
town. The town was regularly laid out 
with a square in the center containing 
three and one-half acres of ground which 
was cleared in 1820. 

The first house built was in the spring 
of 1819 — a log cabin, clapboard roof with 
stick chimney — it stood on in-lot No. 9, 
and was for many years owned and occu- 
pied by Martin Comer. The first store 
was opened by Esq. Odlein 1819; James 
Oldham started the first hat shop. The 
first steam mill was started by Charles 
Kizer in 1835. The first school was a 
cabin which stood on the corner of Wash- 
ington and East streets, erected in 1831. 
The first frame building was erected by 
John Sample in 1820. The first brick 
house was built by David Wysong, 1826, 
on the northwest corner Public Square. 
The first carding machine was owned by 
David Petty in 1820, and run by oxen. 
James McCool started a hotel in 1819 in 
a double log cabin. The first mail route 
was opened in 1827 between Ft. Wayne 
and this place, the mail being carried on 
horseback by Chas. Kizer, afterward br- 
others, and subsequently by John Conner 
up to 1861 . Thomas Butterworth started 
the first wagon shop in 1838. John Way 
or James Fraizer the first blacksmith shop 
about the same- time. Thus we have the 
origin of the present flourishing city. 



WINCHESTER TO-DAY 

is pleasantly situated upon an elevated 
plateau with a population of about 4,000 
inhabitants, with broad and well built 
streets and flourishing business houses, 
giving evidence of progress and enter- 
prise. We refer to editorial notices in 
this work in which the leading business, 
houses are specially mentioned. 

The elegant court house building which 
stands in the center of the Public Square 
is a credit to the city and county. It was 
built in 1875 by A. J. Campfield, con- 
tractor, and J. C. Johnson, architect, at a 
cost of 873,000, completed and accepted 
in 1877. It is of fine architectural ap- 
pearance, with a tower in which is a town 
clock which cost 81,500. The building- 
is two stories besides semi-basement and 
mansard roof. It is constructed chiefly 
of pressed brick and iron, and the heating- 
apparatus cost $4,900. Winchester is sit- 
uated near the center of the county, 75 
miles northeast of Indianapolis, 67 miles- 
south of Ft. Wayne, and is surrounded 
by a rich agricultural district. It has five 
churches, one fine public school building 
and two smaller buildings. The churches- 
are, one M. E. Church, one German M. E. 
Church, one Christian, one Friends meet- 
ing house, and one Catholic Church. It 
is well supplied with weekly papers: The 
Winchester Journal, published by A..C. 
Beeson; Winchester Herald, by John 
Commons; the Phantasmagora, by W. P. 
Needham, and the Winchester Democrat, 
by J. P. Polk. The three former are Re- 
publican in politics while the latter, which 
recently removed from Ridgeville, is 
Democratic. There are five secret socie- 
ties, as follows: A. F. and A. M., No. 56; 
I. O. O. F., No. 121; K. of P.; K. of If.; 
and G. A. P.; the latter organized in 1882 
with 24 members, having now about 100 
members. Pulsing with business life, cul- 
ture and intelligence this beautiful inland 
city possesses the elements of rapid 
growth and prosperity. 



CITY OF WINCHESTER. 



147 



WINCHESTER WAGON WORKS, 
Wagon Manufacturers. 
Advantageously located in close proximity 
to one of the finest lumber producing districts 
of Indiana, with unrivalled facilities for secur- 
ing unlimited supplies of the best materials for 
wagon making purposes, so lavishly furnished 
by nature and so admirably adapted for the 
manufacture of spokes, axles, felloes, gearing, 
etc., the city of Winchester possesses unri- 
valled facilities and advantages for the suc- 
cessful prosecution of an extensive business in 
this important department of industrial enter- 
prise. Nor have these advantages and facilities 
been overlooked or disregarded by our repre- 
sentative capitalists and business men, who 
have in the organization of the Winchester 
Wagon Works and Manufacturing Company 
established an industry which has given to 
the city of Winchester a national reputation 
as the headquarters for a variety of farm and 
spring wagons, which will compare favorably 
with those produced at any similar establish - 



devoted to the wood working and finishing- 
departments, is 50x142 feet in dimensions and 
is thoroughly equipped throughout with the 
most approved designs of special machinery, 
especially constructed for the purposes for 
which it is employed and propelled by one 100 
horse power steam engine and two boilers, for 
the accommodation of which has been erected 
a spacious and conveniently arranged engine 
house and boiler room 40x550 feet in size. The 
iron working department is conducted in a 
blacksmith shop 40x60 feet, and in addition to 
the edifices above enumerated are numerous- 
other buildings and sheds for storage and drv- 
ing purposes. An average force of 50 experi- 
enced workmen is employed in the various 
departments, necessitating the weekly dis- 
bursement of more than $500 for the item of 
labor alone. The works have a capacity for 
turning out 20 finished wagons per dav, in the 
construction of which the best material oniv 
is used and the most thorough workmanship- 
prevails, even in the most (seemingly) insig- 




ment in the Union. This important enterprise 
had its inception in a very small way about 15 
years ago, when it was established in a small 
shop, where the work was all done by hand 
and by a single individual. From this com- 
paratively insignificant beginning has sprung 
the mammoth manufacturing establishment 
of to-day, the pride of our thriving and pro- 
gressive municipality and one of our most 
important vitalizing institutions. On the zijth 
of October, iSSr, a stock company was or- 
ganized and in the following month it was 
chartered and incorporated under the corpora- 
tion laws of the state of Indiana with a capital 
of $25,000. The success attendant upon this 
enterprise was so marked and the demand for 
its products so far beyond their capacity at 
that time that in less than one year the capi- 
tal stock was increased to $75,000, but the 
rapidly growing demands for the products 
necessitated a larger increase of capital, which 
was increased to $100,000, the present capital 
stock. The plant of these works now occu- 
pies a ground space of five acres, upon which 
are erected numerous buildings, among which 
may be especially mentioned the following 
principal ones. The main factory building, 



nificant parts. The wagons are subjected to 2 
most rigid scrutiny and critical examination 
in every detail before they are permitted to 
leave the works. The wagons manufactured 
here have already secured a national reputa- 
tion and are now sold by dealers or agents in 
every state of the Union. The officers of the 
company as at present organized are: Presi- 
dent, H. H. Neff; Secretary, Treasurer and 
General Manager, General Asahel Stone; 
Directors, A. Stone, H. H. Neff, A. Hirsch, 
Hon. T. M. Brown and A. J. Cranor. These 
gentlemen are among our most prominent 
citizens and successful business men and 
are referred to at length in other por- 
tions of this volume in connection with 
other branches of industrial, commercial 
or financial" pursuits. General Asahel Stone, 
the Secretary, Treasurer and General Mana- 
ger, is one of the principal stockholders in the 
company, as he is also in the Randolph 
County Bank. He is a representative man in 
the strictest sense of the word, possessing as 
he does the general respect and confidence of 
all classes in this section of the state. To him 
has been entrusted some of the most import- 
ant and responsible positions of public trust. 



148 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



extending back over a period of nearly 40 
years. In 1837, when but 30 years of age, he 
was chosen by the Whig party to represent 
this county in the House of Representatives. 
He was also a prominent nominee before the 
Constitutional Convention in this state in 
184S. In 1S60 he was elected to the Indiana 
Senate, where he at once took a prominent 
rank. While in that body he took an active 
position as a member of the various important 
committees. In 1S61 he was appointed Com- 
missary General. In the following year (Oc- 
tober, 1S62) he was appointed Quartermaster 
General, a position requiring a rare executive 
ability; resigning that responsible position 
after the close of the war with the highest 
endorsements of public approval. In 1S65 he 
was one of the organizers of the First National 
Bank of Winchester and was the trusted 
President of that institution for many years. 
In 1S7S the bank was reorganized under a new 
banking law and styled the "Randolph County 




wTSCHESTEB WAGON WORKS & MATTCJFACTUBI NO CO. 
Wixchester, Bajidolph Co., Ind. 

Bank," with General Stone as President 
That position he still holds. In 1S67 he was 
again called from private life bv his fellow 
citizens of Randolph County that he might 
bear the Republican banner to victory once 
more. He responded to the call and was 
triumphantly elected to the General Assem- 
bly of the state. The Hon. T. M. Brown is 
also a man of national reputation, being the 
representative of this district in the United 
States Congress at the present time. With 
such an array of business talent and ability it 
cannot be wondered at that the transactions of 
the Winchester Wagon Works have attained 
their present magnificent proportions, nor is it 
going too far to assert in this connection that 
the ample measure of success attendant upon 
the operations of this company have been 
largely due and may be in a great degree 
attributed to the enterprising, honorable and 
liberal policy which has characterized the 
administration of its able and efficient general 
manager. 



FARMERS' AND MERCHANTS' BANK. 
As a fiduciary as well as financial institu- 
tion, the Farmers' and Merchants' Bank of 
Winchester has, since its inception, been inti- 
mately connected with the business interests 
of the community, and its career has been uni- 
formly prosperous and beneficial to its patrons. 
Established in 1S78 with a capital stock of 
$50,000, the following named officers were 
elected: President, N. Reed; Vice President, 
James Moorman; Cashier, T. F. Moorman; 
Assistant Cashier, Thos. Moorman. Shortly 
after its organization it was found necessary 
and deemed expedient by the directory to in- 
crease the capital to $So,oco, which was 
accordingly done. As an evidence of the 
present prosperity of this institution, it may be 
stated that the number of depositors is now 
about 450, and according to a recent state- 
ment there is an accumulated surplus fund of 
$io,Soo. Transacting a general banking busi- 
ness in loans, discounts, collections, exchanges 
and deposits, the Farmers' and Merchants' 
Bank is regarded as a favorite and reliable 
institution and inspires universal confidence. 
The officers of the bank at pre^ent time are the 
same as at its inception, and their administra- 
tion of its affairs has been characterized by a 
safe, conservative, yet at the same time a lib- 
eral policy, which has greatly aided the 
strength and standing of the institution. 



W. H. ROGERS & SON, 
General Foundry. 
Each succeeding year adds to the multi- 
plicity of uses of iron for commercial, indus- 
trial, architectural and mechanical purposes 
and exhibits new channels of demand and in- 
creased consumption, necessitating the organi- 
zation of new industrial establishments and 
improved methods of production. Among the 
recent additions to Winchester's productive 
industries is the extensive foundry^ and orna- 
mental iron works, erected in the spring of 
1SS3 by the enterprising firm of W. H.Rogers 
& Son, which for convenience, general com- 
pleteness of detail and special adaptability to 
to the bu-iness, is one of the best and most 
thoroughly equipped works of the class in the 
United States. The main building, which is 
40x120 feet in dimensions and 16 feet to comb 
of roof, is light, airy and admirably arranged 
for the expeditious transaction of business and 
has a capacity for turning out three tons of 
finished castings per day, with ample facilities 
for the production of every description of iron 
work, from the smallest and most delicate 
castings to the heaviest pieces of machinery, 
store fronts and building materials. The 
cupola has a melting capacity of five tons, 
which will be increased as occasion requires, 
and one 15 horse power engine and boiler fur- 
nishes motive force for the machinery em- 
ployed. About eight arti-ans are at present 
employed, which torce will be augmented as 
the demand for the products of the foundry 
I increase*. Some fine specimens of archi- 



CITY OF WINCHESTER. 



149 



-tectural iron work have recently been turned 
•out here, which reflects great credit upon the 
■enterprise and ability of the projectors of this 
-important industry and exhibits to a pleasing 
extent the resources and capabilities of this 
model establishment. Mr. \V. H- Rogers is a 
native of England and was born in the city of 
Liverpool in 1829. He has been for many 
years a citizen of the United States and is a 
practical and experienced iron moulder. His 
«on and business associate, Mr. John Rogers, 
was born in the state of New Jersey in 1850. 
He is a practical mechinist and a mechanician 
-of more than ordinary ability. 

RANDOLPH COUNTY BANK. 

Justly ranked among the most scflid, sub- 
stantial and successful financial and fiduciary 
institutions of the state of Indiana, the Ran- 
dolph County Bank takes a prominent place 
.and exerts an active influence upon the com- 
mercial and monetary interests of this com- 
munity. Originally established under the 
National Banking System as the First Na- 
tional Bank of Winchester, it was re organized 
.and chartered as the Randolph County Bank 
in 1878, with a capital stock of $100,000. At 
this time the following named officers were 
-elected: "President, General A. Stone; Cash- 
ier, W. A. Martin; Assistant Cashier, Ezra 
.TCelley. Although changes have since been 
made in the prrsonel of its management, the 
policy which was inaugurated at its inception 
has never materially changed and its wisdom 
has been amply demonstrated by a success 
which must be regarded as remarkable, even 
.among the most successful, and the accumu- 
lation of a surplus fund of more than $53,000 
■over and above the amounts which have been 
paid to stockholders as dividends. General 
banking operations are transacted, collections 
made on all points, deposits received, commer- 
cial paper negotiated and exchange effected on 
Eastern or Western cities. The present offi- 
cers of the bank are, President, General Asahel 
Stone; Cashier, Dennis Kelley, Assistant 
■Cashier, S. D. Coates. With such a manage- 
ment, the Randolph County Bank has become 
.a favorite institution, and while achieving suc- 
cess in all legitimate banking operations, it 
has at the same time secured and retained the 
• confidence, respect and consideration of the 
entire community. 



-"STANDARD MILLS," 

Bates Bros. A: Co., Propr.'s; High 

Grade Flolrs. 
Among the most notable and important 
improvements of the present century may be 
especially commended those pertaining to 
the manufacture of high grade flours by what 
is technically known as the "gradual reduction 
process," which has been successfully adopted 
by Messrs. Bates Bros. & Co., proprietors of 
the well known "Standard Mills," of Win- 
chester, Ind. These representative flouring' 
mills, the only ones of the kind in the city, 
■were erected about 16 years ago by Messrs. 



Heaston Bros., who were succeeded by J. 
Robinson & Co., that firm by Colton & Bates, 
and they in turn by the present proprietors in 
1S76. The mill building proper is a commo- 
dious three and one-half story brick structure 
40x100 feet in dimensions and supplied with 
newest special machinery, known as the roller 
system, comprising two reducing machines, 
five set of double and two set of single rolls, 
propelled by a steam engine and boiler, per- 
forming work equivalent to 75 horse power. 
Eight assistants are employed, most of whom 
are skilled and experienced millers, and the 
capacity of the mills is 150 barrels of fine flour 
every 24 hours, which meets with a ready 
demand and sale in the local market, as well 
as shipments to Eastern cities. Messrs. J.J 
and Ed. Bates are natives of Stark County, O., 
and have resided in this city since 1S73. The 
former is a practical miller, thoroughly con- 
versant with all branches and departments of 
the business. Mr. G. E. Leggett, also a native 
of Ohio, came to Winchester in 1S76, at the 
time of the formation of the present partner- 
ship. Adding to the material resources and 
industrial thrift of the community and inti- 
mately connected with its developments and 
prosperity, this representative firm has achieved 
a position as richly deserved as it is gladlv 
accorded among the leading houses of Eastern 
Indiana. 



JESSE CONNOR, 

Butter, Eggs, Poultry, etc. 
One of the leading houses in this section of 
the state engaged in this important depart- 
ment of commercial enterprise is located at 
Winchester and conducted by Mr. Jesse Con- 
nor, whose annual transactions will exceed 
$50,000. This house was originallv estab- 
lished in 1S61 by the firm of Edger & Conner 
and came into the possession of the present 
proprietor in 1S74. Two rooms, each 20x20 
feet in size, are occupied for storage and pack- 
ing purposes, and Mr. Connor handles weekly 
not less than 6,000 dozen eggs, 3,000 to 4,000 
pounds of butter, about 4,000 pounds of poultry 
and large quantities of game in season. He 
purchases direct from producers and from 
country merchants within a radius of s;o to 75 
miles and ships in large lots to wholesale 
dealers in New York City. Six assistants are 
employed in this branch of his business, in 
addition to which he makes a specialty of con- 
ducting refreshment and confectionerv stands 
at county fairs, camp meetings, etc., in their 
appropriate seasons, furnishing emplovment to 
a considerable additional force. Sir." Conner, 
who is a native and lite long resident of this 
county, commenced business as above noted 
without capital or means, save his own energy, 
indomitable perseverance and determination to 
succeed in his chosen undertaking by an hon- 
orable system of dealing, and has built up a 
trade which is alike creditable to his enter- 
prise and ability and conduces to the material 
prosperity and commercial thrift ol our pro- 
gressive and grosving municipality. 



150 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



J. CRANOR & CO., 
Lumber. 

The onlv exclusively lumber house in Win- 
chester, that conducted under the firm name 
and style of J. Crnnor & Co., was founded in 
iSSi, and since that time has established a 
large and lucrative trade, handling annually 
at the present time more than 1,000,000 feet of 
lumber. The grounds occupied for yard and 
storage purposes cover an area of about one- 
half acre, upon which are erected office, sheds, 
etc., for storage purposes, and the stock em- 
braces all varieties of framing timbers, scant- 
ling, boards, planks, weather boarding, flooring, 
finishing stuff, lath, shingles and building 
materials generally, which, owing to the facili- 
ties enjoyed for procuring supplies direct from 
the lumber producing districts of this and 
adjoining states, they are enabled to offer in 
large or small quantities at the very lowest 
rates. Colonel Cranor, the sole owner of the 
business, was born in North Carolina, but 
came to this state when quite young, settling 
at Centerville, Wayne County, where he 
learned the trade of hatter, serving his appren- 
ticeship at the same bench with the lamented 
Oliver P. Morton. As years passed on their 
lives drifted apart, Colonel Cranor removing 
to Ohio, where he lived for many years. His 
life has been an eventful one, characterized by 
a participation in a greater number of impor- 
tant and eventful scenes and incidents in our 
country's history than usually falls to the lot 
ot one individual in this prosaic age. He was 
a soldier in the Mexican war, serving with 
credit and distinction in the glorious cam- 
paigns of the American Army under Gen- 
erals Scott and Taylor, and prior to the 
outbreak of the war of the rebellion was 
prominently identified with the state military 
organization of Ohio. He was an intimate 
friend of General Garfield, both before and 
during the war, and was among the first to 
respond to the call of the President for troops 
to aid in maintaining the supremacy of our 
flag. He entered the service as Captain of 
Company I, 11th Ohio Infantry. At the 
expiration of the regiment's term of service 
(three months) he at once re entered the ser- 
vice and recruited the 40th Ohio Infantry, 
■which formed a part of the brigade under 
the command of General Garfield. During 
the period in which he remained in command 
of his regiment, Colonel Cranor aided his com- 
manding officer by his advice and practical 
knowledge of military matters, greatly pro- 
moting the efficiency and general discipline, 
the officer in command having little or no 
knowledge of military affairs at that time. 
He was the trusted friend and companion of 
Garfield and from him received numerous 
flattering testimonials of gratitude for his 
assistance and co operation. Colonel Cranor 
is personally cognizant of many interesting 
and heroic incident* of General Garfield's 
military career, which have never been given 
to the public and many which have been 
either unintentionally or wilfully misrepre- 



sented by the historian, who awarded honors 
that justly belonged to others. After General 
Gartield "was relieved from his command, 
April, 1S62, Colonel Cranor was placed in 
command of al! military forces in Eastern 
Kentucky. After the organization of the state 
into military districts he was retained in com- 
mand of the Eastern District. This position 
was ably filled by him until 1S63, when he 
was forced to resign his command on ac- 
count of chronic diarrhoea and general 
disability, resulting from unusual hardships 
and exposure. He was one of the State Presi- 
dential electors at the time of General Grant's 
first election as President and served with dis- 
tinction as a member of the Ohio State Senate 
during (he administration of Governor Brough. 
Since becoming a resident of Winchester, in 
1SS0, he has been prominently identified with 
the industrial interests of that city. 



D. E. HOFFMAN, 

Marble and Monumental Works. 
As a representative establishment engaged 
in the manufacture of marble and stone work 
of every description, the city of Winchester is 
fortunate in the possession of one which will 
in the artistic execution of its work compare 
favorably with any similar house in this sec- 
tion of the Union. The works of Mr. D. E. 
Hoffman, to which reference is here made, 
were established by the present proprietor in 
1S57 and for more than a quarter of a century 
have been noted for the unvarying excellence 
of their products and the ability displayed in 
their management. Among the most elegant 
and attractive monuments in our beautiful 
Fountain Park Cemetery which have ema- 
nated from this house may be mentioned in 
this connection those erected to the memory 
of Mrs. Harvey Wysong, at a cost of about 
$2,500, and that to General Stone, at an ex- 
pence of $2,300. The ground space occupied 
for yards and manufacturing purposes is SoxSo 
feet in dimensions and three experienced 
workmen are constantly employed, while in 
busy seasons this force is considerably aug- 
mented. Mr. Hoffman, who is a native of 
the state of Pennsylvania, was born in 1S3S 
but has been a resident of this city since 1857, 
at which time his present successful enterprise 
was inaugurated. Unlike most of his con- 
temporaries in other localities, Mr. Hoffman 
neither solicits work personally nor employs 
traveling agents. To those desirous of pro- 
curing any description of work in his line, he 
will, however, cheerfully furnish any informa- 
tion in his power and original designs and 
estimates if desired. This is the only estab- 
lishment of its kind in the city, and by strict 
attention and application, thorough workman- 
ship and honorable methods of dealing, Mr. 
Hoffman has not only established a prosperous 
and lucrative business but amassed a hand- 
some competency, owning a fine residence and 
farm, which have been purchased from the 
proceeds of his integrity since becoming a 
resident of this city and state. 



CITY OF WINCHESTER. 



151 



WINCHESTER TANNERY, 

Charles Gutheil, Prop.; Manufac- 
turer of Shoe and Harness Leather. 
•Due prominence should be accorded to the 
extensive tannery and leather house of Mr. 
Charles Gutheil, one of the leading establish- 
ments of its class in Eastern Indiana. This 
representative industry had its inception more 
than a quarter of a century ago, when Mr. S. 
Younkers established a tannery here upon a 
comparatively moderate scale. He was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. F. Hildebrand, who disposed of 
his interest in 1867 to the present enterprising 
proprietor; under whose energetic manage- 
ment the number and size of the buildings, as 
well as the producing capacity of the tannery, 
has been more than doubled. The present 
buildings comprise a three story frame struc- 
ture 20x125 ' ee t * n dimensions, with an L 
20x30, a building 20x125, a bark shed 20x130 
and other smailer structures used for various 
purposes. One X) horse power steam engine 
is employed and from five to seven assistants 
in the different departments. The annual out- 
put of this tannery is about 1,000 kips and 
2,000 sides of harness and 1,000 sides of upper, 
besides calf skins, etc, most of the former be- 
ing disposed of in Indianapolis and other cities 
to the jobbing trade, where on account of its 
uniform excellence and superiority it meets 
with a ready sale. Mr. Gutheil also manu- 
factures about 50 barrels of glue per year, the 
total value of his annual products ranging 
from $14,000 to $16,000. In addition to his 
extensive manufacturing interests, Mr. Guth- 
eil makes a specialty of dealing in sole 
leather, linings, etc., for which he finds a 
ready sale in this and adjacent counties. Mr. 
Gutheil is a native of Germany, Born in 1830, 
but came to this country in 1S49, landing at 
New Orleans. He first stopped at Cincin- 
nati, O., where he completed his trade of tan- 
ner and currier, and after about two years 
went to Dayton, O. He then established a 
tannery on his own account at Bellbrook, 
Greene County, O., in 1S61, where he re- 
mained for six years prior to becoming a resi- 
dent of this city. With the proverbial thrift 
of his race, aided by indomitable energy, perse- 
verance, industry and economy, he has become 
one of the leading manufacturers of this sec- 
tion of the state and is justly entitled to promi- 
nent recognition as one ot the representative 
self made men and successful merchants of 
the present day. 



IRVIN HOUSE, 

Sylvester O. Irvin, Prop. 
If there is any one point of superiority to 
which the city of Winchester may point with 
justifiable pride it is the character of the ac- 
commodations furnished at that model cara- 
vansary, the Irvin House, the praises of which 
are sounded by every traveling man who has 
had occasion to visit this section of Eastern 
Indiana and enjoy its generous and princely 
hospitality. Established by its present genial 
and accomplished proprietor about eight years 



ago, this house has since that time been recog- 
nized as the leading hotel of the city, and as 
such has been continually' taxed to its utmost 
extent to meet the requirements of its tran- 
sient guests, no regular boarders being admit- 
ted on account of the limited room space in 
the present building, which is, architecturally 
speaking, a plain and unpretentious two story 
edifice, containing only about 24 rooms, but 
centrally and eligibly located on the princi- 
pel business thoroughfare. On the first floor 
is located the office, reading and writing room, 
baggage and wash rooms, sample room, dining 
room and kitchen and culinary department. 
On the second is the beautiful parlor and re- 
ception room. Excepting the rooms men- 
tioned above, the building is devoted to sleep- 
ingapartments and guests' chambers, furnished 
in modern metropolitan style and kept at all 
times in the most unexceptionable order. 
This house is widely noted for the excellence 
of its cuisine, the table being always supplied 
with the substantial and delicacies* of the sea- 
son, served in the most attractive and approved 
styles known to the culinary art. It may be 
truthfully said, without fear of contradiction or 
suspicion of exaggeration, that in regard to its 
table the Irvin ranks second to no hotel in 
the state of Indiana. Mr. Sylvester O. Irvin, 
the gentlemanly and attentive proprietor, is a 
direct descendant of one of the oldest and most 
highly esteemed pioneer families of this sec- 
tion and was born December 26th, 1S27. He 
is an old and experienced hotel man, emi- 
nently qualified by experience, disposition and 
nature for the position which he so acceptably 
fills. He is a prominent and influential mem- 
ber of the great national Democratic party, an 
active worker in local and state politics and 
for many years occupied the responsible posi- 
tion of Secretary of the Democratic Central 
Committee of this county. 



WINCHESTER WOOLEN MILLS, 
J. D. Carter & Co., Propr's. 
The present works, which were erected by* 
Mr. Carter in 1S79, are at the present time 
inadequate to meet the steadily increasing 
demands upon their resources, and extensive 
additions and improvements are contemplated 
in the immediate future. The main building 
now occupied tor manufacturing purposes con- 
tains three floors, each 25x40 feet in dimen- 
sions, equipped with the latest improved 
designs of woolen machinery, propelled by one 
20 horse power engine and boiler. In "addi- 
tion to this structure is an office building and 
an engine house and boiler room. The pres- 
ent annual capacity of the mills is 5,000 
pounds of yarn, Soo pair of fine blankets, be- 
sides other woolen goods and flannels. In 
addition to the sale of their manufactured pro- 
ducts, this firm shipped during the past year 
about 10,000 pounds of wool in its raw state. 
Mr. J. D. Carter, who is a native of this state, 
has been a resident of Winchester for the past 45 
years, during which time he has been engaged 
in mercantile and manufacturing pursuits. 



152 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



P. H. DEAN, 

Fine Art GallTkry. 




Among the most important of the various 
appliances which have been introduced within 
the past decade is the improved photographic 
burnisher, invented by Mr. P. H. Dean, of 
Winchester, Ind., patented September Sth, 
1S74, and now in practical operation in the 
leading galleries of the Union, from Maine to 
California. This improvement, which com- 
bines simplicity, economy, durability and 
special adaptability for the purposes for which 
it is designed, consists mainly in constructing 
the frame with converging sides, united on 
top and highly polished on the exterior side, 
■which forms the burnishing tool, to be heated 
by alcohol lamp, kerosene, gas jet or other- 
wise, placed under the burnisher between the 
converging sides (which forms a complete 
furnace, thus economizing heat, etc.) The 
feed roll is adjustable and can be readily re- 
moved and readjusted, so as to enable the 
operator to clean (he burnisher when it be- 
comes necessary and also to prevent sweating 
or condensing of steam on the roll while the 
burnisher is being heated. The feed is regu- 
lated by means of set screws on top of the 
caps; the roll is raised or lowered by a slight 
turn of the set screws, so as to suit any card. 
One ounce of alcohol is sufficient to burnish 
four to six dozen cards. Further particulars 
and price li>ts will be cheerfully furnished to 
photographers by the proprietor, -whose ad- 
dress is given at "the head of this sketch. Mr. 
Dean, in addition to the manufacture of these 
furnishers, is proprietor of a photographic 
gallery on the east side of the Public Square, 
opposite the Court House, where he occupies a 
reception room 15x20 and an operating room 
15x30 feet in dimensions. On his walls may 
be seen some admirable specimens of his 
artistic workmanship, in the way of life like 
portraits finished in crayon, india ink and oil, 
which will not suffer by a critical comparison 
With tho-r of any contemporaneous establish- 
ment in the large cities of the Union. He 
also makes a specialty of copying and enlarg- 
ing picture^ of any description, guaranteeing 
perfect satisfaction and fir>t class workman- 
ship in all in-tances. Mr. Dean is a native of 
Mercer County, Ky., and has been a resident 
of this state for many years, first locating at 



Muncie in 1856, where he made the first pho- 
tograph ever produced in that city. He is a. 
thoroughly practical and artistic photographer, 
becoming familiar with all 
branches of the profession as 
then practiced, at Louisville, 
Kentucky, before coming U» 
this state, and since then he: 
has kept fully abreast of the 
progressive spirit of the age 
in all that pertains to the 
development and perfection: 
of the art. He came to Win- 
chester in 1S66, at which time; 
he established the business* 
which has since grown tct 
such gratifying proportions. 
under his enterprising andi 
enersetic management. 



C. W. WOOLVERTOX, 

Boots, Shops, Leather and Findings;, 
Southwest Corker Public Sql are. 
Extensively engaged in the sale of this im- 
portant factor of our commercial system andi 
in the manufacture of boots, shoes, brogan*-, 
etc., the house of Mr. C. W. Woolvertoax, 
southwest corner Public Square, demands, 
conspicuous recognition as among the most 
important of Winchester's commercial and 
industrial institutions. Founded in 1S74 ty? 
it spresent enterprising proprietor, this housce 
has established both a wholesaleandretail tradt- 
which has steadily increased with aech suc- 
ceeding year and which will compare favora- 
bly with that of any similar establishment ita 
Eastern Indiana. His salesroom, at the loca.- 
tion above designated, is 1SX50 feet in dimen- 
sions, in addition to other room, where may bc- 
found at all times a lull stock of boots, shoes,, 
leather and findings, which are offered to the 
trade at rates which will successfully compete 
with those of any contemporaneous establish- 
ment in the large ci'ies. Mr. Woolverto.n 
makes a leading specialty of hand sewed bro- 
gans from his own factory, which is located Era 
the same building, the average annual products 
of which amounts to about $3,000, which are 
shipped to dealers in diiferent parts of ttoe 
state. The annual transactions of this repre- 
sentative house range from $12,000 to $16,0010 
and the valuation of stock carried will closely 
approximate $5,000. Mr. Woolverton is a 
native of Bucks County, Pa , born in 1S36, brat 
located in Wayne County, Ind., in 1857, re- 
moving to Winchester in 1S72. He is practi- 
cally conversant with all branches of the shoe 
and leather business, in which he has been 
engaged since a young man, and since em- 
barking in his present successful enterprise 
has secured a large and gratifying trade and ,a 
reputation for enterprise, integrity and honors - 
ble dealing enti'ling him to prominent ran : k 
among the representative merchants of lExe 
West In iSf.i he enli-ted in Company F3, 
19th Indiana Volunteer Infantry, served in the 
Army of the Potomac, receiving an honour- 
able discharge in February, 1S63. 



CITY OF WINCHESTER. 



153 



MANDERBACH & GETTLE, 

Family Groceries, Bar and Lunch 
Room, East Side Public Square. 
For more than a quarter of a century the 
name of Mr. Manderbach has been associated 
with the mercantile interests of Winchester 
and prominently identified with the grocery 
trade in this section He first embarked in 
business in this city in 1S57, the firm name at 
that time being McConnell Si Manderbach. 
This partnership remained in force for one 
year, when Mr. Manderbach retired and shortly 
afterwards engaged in business on his own 
account, which he conducted successfully for 
two years, at the expiration of which time 
another partnership was formed, under the 
style of Manderbach & Freeman. The subse- 
quent changes in this house may be briefly 
enumerated as follows: Manderbach $C Monks, 
then Manderbach & Hirsch, William Mander- 
bach alone, Manderbach & Cable until 1SS1, 
when Mr. Manderbach conducted the busi- 
ness alone up to October 16th, 1SS3, when Mr. 
Frederick W. Gettle was admitted to partner- 
ship. This firm occupies as sales department 
a room iSx62 feet in dimensions, at the corner 
of Main and Washington Sts., with a finely 
equipped bakery in the rear, where they make 
a specialty of manufacturing family bread, 
cake and crackers, turning out annually more 
than 700 barrels of the latter commodity, 
which they furnish to merchants and dealers 
in the surrounding towns, and use on an aver- 
age about nine barrels of flour per week. In 
the grocery department they carry a full and 
complete fine of staple and fancy articles per- 
taining to this branch and transact a flourish- 
ing business, with an extended p itronage 
throughout both city and country. Mr. Man- 
derbach is a native of Nassau, Germany, and 
was born in 1S34. He came to the United 
States in 1S50 and first located at Dayton, O., 
where he remained for about three years, 
prior to becoming a resident of Winchester. 
Mr. Gettle is a native of Ohio and was born 
at Canal Winchester in 1855. He came to 
this state with his parents in 1S57 and had 
chiefly been engaged in agricultural pursuits 
up to the formation of the present business 
relations. 



MILLER & FUDGE, 

Dry Goods, Clothing, Carpets, No- 
tions, etc., South Side Public Square. 
Occupying a prominent position among the 
leading merchants of Eastern Indiana and 
standing confessedly at the head of all similar 
houses in the city of Winchester, we notice 
the firm of Miller & Fudge, which was estab- 
lished by the consolidation of the two houses 
of Mr. Miller and Mr. Fudge in 1SS3, and 
which from the very inception of its career as 
a firm has maintained a high rank among its 
contemporaries and in the estimation of our 
citizens. This representative house occupies 
two entire floors, each embracing a frontage of 
3S}^ xl co feet in dimensions, in the spacious 



and elegant new block which was erected dur- 
ing the past season by Mr. Miller, the senior 
member of the firm, expressly for their occu- 
pancy and which forms one of the most com- 
modious and convenient business blocks in the 
state, where they carry a large and carefully 
selected stock of imported and American dry 
goods, dress goods, linens and domestics, hou-e 
furnishing goods, ready made clothing, gei tie- 
men's furnishing goods, carpets and oi: :loths, 
notions, small wares, fancy good- and miscella- 
neous merchandise legitimately pertaining to 
above named departments of commerce. In 
addition to the member-, of the firm, six com- 
petent salesmen anil a-sis'.ants are cmplnud 
in the different departments, and the trace is 
derived net only from the city but from even 
the most remote portions of Rar.do'p'i ar.i 
Jay counties. Mr. W. E. Miller is a n.itive of 
Montgomery County, O., where he was bom 
in 4S46, and Mr. David Fudge of Preble 
Countv, O., and was born in 1S41. Transact- 
ing a business aggregating many thousand- of 
dollars per annum, this house affords to its 
parrons facilities unequalled and unsurpassed, 
both from the advantages derived from its 
great resources and enlarged connet tions with 
the leading manufacturers, importers and job- 
bers of the East. 



A. R. HI ATT, 
Hardware. 
From the great variety of stock and diver- 
sity of articles comprising the equipment of a 
modern hardware store, it becomes apparent 
that the business is one requiring not only a 
considerable capital for its successful prosecu- 
tion but a thorough knowledge of its peculiar 
features and multifarious details in order to 
keep fully abreast of the times in those modern 
improvements and inventions pertaining to its 
dirierent departments which characterize the 
progressive spirit of the 19th century. The 
oldest as well as the leading house in this line 
in the city of Winchester was established as 
early as in 1S55 by Mr. Thomas Ward, who 
was' succeeded in 1S65 by Mr. A. R. Hiatt, 
who successfully conducted the business in 
his own name until 1S6S, when the firm name 
and style became Ward & Hiatt. This part- 
nership remained in force for three years, 
when in 1S71 Mr. Hiatt again became sole 
proprietor and has since that time established 
a trade which will compare favorably with 
that of any contemporaneous house in this 
section of the state. The main salesroom. 
which is 20x90 feet in dimensions, is rilled to 
repletion with a large and comprehensive 
assortment of heavy and shelf hardware, agri- 
cultural and mechanics' tools and implements, 
building materials pertaining to this line, table 
and pocket cutlery and house furni-hing goods 
in great variety, "in addition to this is a ware- 
room 20x56 feet in size for the storage of 
heavy merchandise and original packages. 
The trade of this representative house, 
although largely of a local character, extends 
to all sections "of the county and is firmly 



154 



STATE OF INDIANA. 






established upon a solid and substantial basis. 
Mr. Hiatt is a native of North Carolina, where 
he was born in 1S29. He has been a resident 
of this county since he was four years of age 
and for nearly two decades prominently identi- 
fied with the hardware trade, as well as with 
other branches of commercial enterprise. 
Under the firm name of J. R. Hiatt & Son he 
also conducts one of the principal boot and 
shoe houses of Winchester. It has been es- 
tablished since 1SS1 and has already secured a 
growing and prosperous trade. The manage- 
ment of this house devolves upon A. R. Hiatt, 
Jr., a native and lifelong resident of this state, 
where he was born in 1S55. He possesses 
good executive ability, entitling him to promi- 
nent rank among the representative business 
men of Winchester. 



ALFRED RICE, 

Saw Mill and Planing Mill. 
The manufacture and preparation of lumber 
constitutes one of the important industries of 
the city of Winchester and claims attention in 
a review of the resources of our thriving city. 
The saw and planing mills now owned and 
operated by Mr. Alfred Rice was established 
in 1S75 and have since been in successful 
operation. The plant of these mills covers a 
ground space of 155x246 feel, upon which is 
erected a mill building 25x50 feet in dimen- 
sions, with boiler room 14x50, containing one 
15 horse power engine. The saw mill has 
ample facilities for getting out 32 feet stu.Tfand 
has a daily capacity for manufacturing about 
5,000 feet. The average output at the present 
time is not less than 70,000 per month, and in 
addition to this the planing machine is kept 
constantly in use preparing and dressing lum- 
ber for building purposes. The demand for 
the lumber products of these mills is princi- 
pally of a local character. Mr. Rice, the 
enterprising proprietor of these works, is a 
native of Ohio, where he was born in 1S22. 
He has been a resident of Indiana for the past 
17 years, the greater portion of which time he 
has' been extensively engaged in the lumber 
trade, either as manufacturer or dealer. 



S. D. COATES & SON, 

Harness Manlfactureks. 
The harness and saddlery works now con- 
ducted bv the enterprising firm of L. D. Coates 
& Son is" the most extensive establishment of 
the kind in the city, as well as the oldest, hav- 
ing been established for more 'han a quarter 
of a century. Among the various firms and 
individuals which during that period have 
conducted the business may be mentioned 
John Davis, S. 13. Bradbury, Semption & 
Ward, Bradbury & Chapman.'F. B. Chapman, 
Chapman & Harris and again F. B. Chapman, 
who was succeeded by the present proprietor 
August 2d, 1SS3. The premises occupied for 
sales and manufacturing purposes are 16x125 
feet in dimensions, the front portion being 
occupied as sales department and the rear for 



work rooms and storage purposes. N The firm 
carries in stock a large assortment of light and 
heavy single and double harness of their own 
manufacture, at prices ranging from $S to $50 
per set, saddles, bridles, collars, hames, whips, 
robes, blankets and horse clothing and stable 
equipments generally. In the manufacturing 
department four experienced workmen are 
regularly employed and all work turned out 
here is warranted to be of superior material, 
workman-hip and finish. The trade of this 
representative house, which is derived from 
both city ami country, ranges from $10,000 to 
$14,000 per annum and under the energetic 
management of its present proprietors will 
undoubtedly exceed the larger amount during 
the present year. Mr. S. D. Coates, the senior 
member of the firm, is well known in indus- 
trial, commercial and financial circles and at 
the present time occupies the position of 
Assistant Cashier of the Randolph County 
Bank. His son, upon whom devolves the 
general management of the business, is an 
energetic and enterprising young man, thor- 
oughly conversant with all the details of the 
business and the requirements of the trade in 
this section. 

CHAPMAN & GINN, 

Carriage Manufacturers. 

The. only establishment in Winchester de- 
voted to the manufacture of carriages was 
originally founded nearly 20 years ago upon a 
comparatively small scale by Mr. Richard 
Baird, who was succeeded by the firm of 
Baird, Chapman & Co., and they in turn by 
Gardner a: Horan. In 1SS0 the present part- 
nership was formed and Messrs. Chapman & 
Ginn became proprietors of the works, which 
are among the largest and most favorably 
known of tiie kind in this section of the state. 
The building occupied for manufacturing pur- 
poses i- a two story structure 40x125 leet in 
dimensions, and eight experienced 'workmen 
are now employed in the wood and iron work- 
ing, painting and trimming departments. The 
best of material is used and the most thorough 
workmanship characterizes the carriages, bug- 
gies and wagons manufactured here, no work 
being allowed to leave the shops without 
undergoing a critical examination by the pro- 
prietors, who are thoroughly practical car- 
riage makers, familiar with the details of the 
different departments. About 15 or 20 new 
jobs are turned out annually and an extensive 
business is transacted in "the general repair 
department, which is quite an important fea- 
ture of the business ofthisfirm. Mr. William 
Chapman is a native of Pennsylvania and was 
born in 1S37. He has been a resident of this 
state for the past 36 years and during a great 
portion of this time in Randolph County, 
where he learned his trade. Mr. Edwin Ginn 
is a native of Ohio, in which state he was 
born in 1S52. He is also a practical mechanic 
in this line and prior to the formation of the 
present partnership was employed by other 
parties. 



CITY OF WINCHESTER. 



155 



A. G. CAMFIELD, 

Hardwood Logs and Lumber. 
The importance of those industrial and com- 
mercial enterprises contingent upon the devel- 
opment of the hard wood lumber interests ot 
the great state of Indiana cannot be overesti- 
mated, and among them occupying a prominent 
position as one of the leading establishments 
in the eastern portion of the state engaged in 
this important pursuit may be appropriately 
classed that of Mr. A. G. Camfield, dealer 
in oak, ash, hickory and walnut logs and lum- 
l)er and manufacturer of single-trees, neck- 
^okes, ash flooring and general wagon stock. 
This important enterprise was established in 
1879 and now occupies for business purposes a 
ground space of about three acres, upon 
which is erected a saw mill 52x110 feet in 
dimensions and a planing mill 30x60 feet in 
size. The former has a capacity of 10,000 feet 
of lumber every ten hours and its diurnal out- 
put at the present time averages about 6,000 
feet. Its facilities are first class in every re- 
spect and its equipment ot the most approved 
■character, capable of getting out 30 feet stuff. 
The planing mill and manufacturing depart- 
ment is also thoroughly equipped with special 
designs of wood working machinery for the 
manufacture of the articles above enume-ated. 
Motive power for the two mills is supplied by 
two steam engines and boilers, with a com- 
bined force equivalent to 75 horse power, and 
an average force of 12 workmen is employed 
in the different departments. The wagon 
stock, neck-yokes, felloes, etc., manufactured 
here are shipped to Chicago and a large pro- 
portion of the ash and walnut lumber to deal- 
ers in New York and Philadelphia. Mr. 
Camfield, who is a native of the state of New 
Jersey, was born in 1S34 and is a practical 
carpenter and builder. He was the contractor 
and builder of the Court House at Nobleville, 
Ind., and also of the Court House in this city, 
which is justly regarded as one of the finest 
public buildings in the state and was erected 
at a cost of $73,000. Mr. John Light, his 
'brother-in-law, is general superintendent of 
the mills, and under his efficient management 
the most thorough system prevails in the 
-mechanical departments. 



CHARLES F. KEENER, 

Livery, Feed and Sale Stables. 
Intimately associated with the commercial, 
industrial and social interests of the city of 
Winchester in a variety of ways is the livery, 
feed and sale stables of Mr. Charles F. Keener, 
which were established in iS74nt their present 
location, where a one story structure 40x125 
feet in dimensions is occupied for the pur- 
poses above named. In the livery department 
Mr. Keener keeps constantly for hire from 
eight to twelve fine horses and a number of 
•carriages, buggies, road wagons and other 
vehicles for business or pleasure purposes. In 
the feed and sales department he has ample 
stabling accommodations for about 50 head of 
horses and facilities for boarding that number, 



either by the meal, day or week. Parties vis- 
iting the city by, their own conveyances can 
have their horses cared for by competent and 
experienced hostlers at reasonable r..t<s, and 
dealers or those desirous of purchasing will 
find favorable opportunities by patronizing 
these well known stables. Mr. Keener, who 
is a native of Ohio, was born in 1S52 but has 
resided in this state for the past 22 years. He 
is a thorough and competent judge of hr.rse 
flesh and parties having occasion to transact 
business with him in any capacity will find 
him to be an honorable, upright per-on, whose 
representations may, under all circum-tances, 
be implicitly relied" upon as being strictly in 
accordance with facts. 

MORTIMER MILLER, 
Boots and Shoes. 
There are few, if any, branches of produc- 
tive or commercial avocations which appeal so 
directly to all classes, conditions, ages and 
sexes of the community, irrespective of rank 
and station, as that of the manufacturer of and 
dealer in boots and shoes. Of the latter cla-s, 
in these days of shoddy, we find in some 
localities merchants without character or repu- 
tation, who for the paltry profit they may 
secure will palm upon their unsuspecting 
patrons inferior, if not utterly worthless, 
goods, made in such close imitation of reliable 
work as to deceive the unwary and confiding 
purchaser. On the other hand, we are happy 
to say, there are dealers who possess a thor- 
ough knowledge of qualities and values, which 
they exercise in making their selections, and 
undeviating integrity and honor, which they 
exhibit in the representations which they make 
to customers, thus securing the confidence of 
all with whom they have business relations. 
Of this latter class we find a striking illustra- 
tion in the person of Mr. Mortimer Miller, 
proprietor of the well known boot and shoe 
emporium on Franklin St., Winchester, who 
has during a career in this city of about seven 
vears maintained under all circumstances a 
high standard of commercial honor and busi- 
ness integrity, which has gained for him an 
established trade, not only in this city, but 
throughout the adjoining towns. His sales- 
room, which is 20x60 feet in dimensions, is 
stocked with an admirably selected assortment 
of ladies', gentlemen's and children's boots and 
shoes, from the most reliable manufactories of 
the Union, svhich he offers to patrons at prices 
which will defv successful competition. No 
shoddy or worthless goods ever find a place 
upon his shelves and counters and all repre- 
sentations made by him or his employes will 
be found to accord strictly with the facts. Mr. 
Miller is a native of the state of Illinois, where 
he was born in 1S53. He has been a resident 
of this city for the past nine years, and since 
embarking in his present successful commer- 
cial enterprise has won for himself an enviable 
reputation as one of Winchester's most relia- 
ble representative merchants and business 
men. 



156 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



CITY HOTEL, 

John Roosa, Prop., Near Depot. 
This excellent house, which for the past 10 
years has been a popular stopping place for 
the traveling public, was originally conducted 
by Wash. Fiddler, then by Dave Hobbick, 
then by Al. Everetts, then Horace Biggs, then 
Jonathan Hiatt, and afterward by Mr. S. Irvin 
as Irvin House, and has recently come into 
the hands of Mr. John Roosa, who has put the 
house in complete repair, with entirely new 
furniture, tor the purpose of conducting a first 
class' hotel in every respect The premises 
were purchased by Mr. Roosa in the latter 
part of 1SS3 and immediately upon gaining 
possession of the house, in January, 1SS4, pro- 
ceeded to put it in complete repair and opened 
for business about the 1st of February, 1SS4. 
The complete refitting and refurnishing of the 
house will make it one of the most inviting 
stopping places for guests to be found in East- 
ern Indiana. The table will be provided with 
the best the market affords, and besides pleas- 
ant and well ventilated sleeping apartments, 
parlors, office, etc., a first class sample room will 
be provided for commercial travelers and no 
pains spared to secure to this house the liberal 
patronage it has heretofore enjoyed and merit 
in every respect the fullest public considera- 
tion. Mr. Roosa. the present proprietor of 
this house, is a native of Hamilton County, O., 
where he was born in 1S36. In early life he 
was employed in agricultural pursuits. In 
1S69 he located at Dover, Wayne County, 
where he learned the blacksmithing business, 
in which he has been engaged for the past 15 
years, coming to this city about 13 years ago, 
where he has been engaged in this branch of 
business, which he will still continue. Under 
its new proprietor, and assuming the name by 
which it was formerly known, the City Hotel 
cannot fail to secure its full share of patronage 
from the traveling public. 



J. C. HIRSH, 
Druggist. 

Among those commercial pursuits which 
take the highest rank among the professions 
and industries of all progressive communities, 
the drug and prescription business is entitled 
to more than passing notice in a work devoted 
to the rise and progress of commercial enter- 
prises in this city and state. Taking a leading 
position among its class in Eastern Indiana, 
the establishment of J. C. Hirsh dates its 
origin to over a quarter of a century ago and 
has been in the control of the pre-ent proprie- 
tor for over 20 years. The premises occupied 
embrace a fine business room 20x64 feet in 
dimensions, which is constantly stocked with 
a full line of pure drugs and medicines, all 
popular and desirable p itent medicines, paints, 
oils and varnishes, perfumery and toilet arti- 
cles in large variety, pure wines and liquors 
for medical and sacramental purposes, school 
books and school children's complete outfit, 
stationery, notions, fancy goods, children's 



carriages, tobaccos, cigars, etc. Mr. J. C. 
Hirsh is a native of Germany, where he was 
born in 1836. He came to this country when 
quite young and was engaged in a variety of 
pursuits up to 1S48. He was afterward em- 
ployed in the house of Jacobs & Brown, of 
Hamilton, O., when quite a small boy. In 
1S50 he went to Dayton, O., where he was 
employed in the drug house of J. A. Walters, 
with whom he remained for a period of 11 
years. He was afterwards employed in the 
wholesale drug house of J. S. Burdsal & Co., 
of Cincinnati, O , with whom he remained up 
to the time of coming to this city, in August, 
1S63. Occupying the position of the oldest 
establishment in the city being continuously 
in business, this house is justly entitled to the 
full notice here accorded and the liberal public 
consideration it has always received. 

DAVIS BROS., 

Groceries, Provisions, etc. 
Although established as recently as in 
March, 1SS3, the grocery house of Messrs, 
Davis Bros, has already secured a liberal 
share of public patronage and each succeeding 
month witnesses a gratifying increase in their 
transactions. These gentlemen occupy a neat 
and tastefully arranged salesroom 22x63 * eet 
in dimensions, and their stock, which is new; 
fresh and desirable, embraces a general line or 
the choicest varieties of staple and fancy 
family groceries, teas, coffees, spices, sugars,, 
canned goods, foreign and domestic fruits, fine 
confectionery, choice cigars and manufactured 
tobacco, china, queens and glass ware, notions, 
fancy goods and miscellaneous merchandise 
in great variety, such as is usually found in 
first class, well regulated establishments of 
this description. The individual members of 
the firm, Messrs. K. and Oliver Davis, are 
both natives and lifelong residents of this- 
state. They are enterprising and energetic irt 
the management of their business and the suc- 
cess which has thus far attended their com- 
mercial career is but an index of what may be 
expected in the not far distant future, when 
the house started by them under such favora- 
ble auspices shall become better known and 
take its destined rank among its contempora- 
ries as one of the representative mercantile 
establishments of our thriving and progressive 
community. 

M. C GAFFEY, 

Livery Stables, Washington St. 
These stables were established about 12 
years ago by Messrs. Swallow & Addington, 
who were succeeded by D. Harter, and he in 
turn by the firm of Miller & Mills, afterward 
Mr. Miller alone up to July, 1S83, when the 
present proprietor, Mr. M. C. Gaffey, assumed 
the entire management of the business. The 
buildings occupied cover a ground space of 
3SXI10 feet, with ample accommodations for 
between 30 and 40 horses. Mr. Gaffey keeps- 
for livery purposes from 10 to 15 fine hocse»„ 



CITY OF WINCHESTER. 



157 



•with numerous stylish and comfortable car- 
riages, buggies, road wagons, sleighs, etc., 
which he will let to responsible parties at the 
most reasonable rates. He also makes a 
specialty of furnishing conveyances for pas- 
sengers, commercial travelers, baggage and 
sample cases to the adjacent towns with care- 
/ul and intelligent drivers jf desired, at rea- 
sonable rates. He also buys and sells horses 
at all times. Mr. Gaffey is a native of this 
city and was for about five years the County 
Engineer for this county, prior to embarking 
in his present prosperous business. 



LOUIS KLAMBERG, 
Jeweler. 



The popular jew- 
elry house of Louis 
Klamberg, on Main 
tW-'- ir £^^,^"J^M^ !i ^(' St -i opposite Court 
**£« I^lJnP I H House, Winchester, 
^VP^jh~\ ' - J was established by 
fe-->, & ^~"" f .s ', i §J its present proprie- 
^Wpilffl * V^ tor in 1S72, and has 
=£i-p=* since that time met 
with a liberal degree 
of support and patronage from the citizens of 
this and adjoining towns. The premises occu- 
pied as salesroom and repairing department 
are 20x35 feet in dimensions, and the stock 
embraces a general assortment of English and 
American watches, clocks in a great variety 
of styles, silver and plated table ware and jew- 
elry of the latest and most fashionable styles. 
Mr. Klamberg, who is a practical jeweler and 
watchmaker of many years experience, makes 
a specialty of fine watch repairing, engraving, 
etc., and parties entrusting their watches to his 
hands may rest confidently assured that they 
will be returned thoroughly repaired, cleaned 
and nicely adjusted, by a skilled and profi- 
cient expert and not allowed to have their 
delicate mechanism injured by apprentices or 
inexperienced hands. Mr. Klamberg is a 
native of Hessan, Germany, and came to this 
country in 1S69, landing at Boston, Mass. 
He came West shortly after and located in 
Winchester in 1S72, where by industry, 
energy and integrity he has built up a pros- 
perous business and established for himself an 
enviable reputation as a thorough workman 
and reliable, enterprising merchant. 



KEMP & JACKSON, 

Hardware, Stoves, Tinware, etc. 
As a representative establishment in both a 
commercial and industrial point of view, may 
be mentioned in this connection the well 
known house of Kemp & Jackson, which was 
founded many years ago by the firm of Cra- 
nor Bros, and passed into the possession of the 
present firm in November, 1SS2. The premi- 
ses occupied for sales and manufacturing pur- 
poses are 22x165 ^ eet m dimensions, and in 
the former department will be found at all 
times a general stock of heavy and shelf hard- 
ware, agricultural tools, implements and 



machinery, builders' hardware and materials, 
carpenters' and mechanics' tools, table and 
pocket cutlery, house furnishing goods, tin^ 
copper and sheet iron ware of their own man u- 
facture, cooking and heating stoves and 
ranges, hollow ware and all varieties of mer- 
chandise appropriately pertaining to the above 
branches of trade. In the manufacturing; 
department, which is thoroughly equipped 
with the most approved machinery and appli- 
ances, three experienced metal workers are 
constantly employed in the manufacture of all 
kinds of domestic utensils from tin, copper and 
sheet iron, while particular attention is devoted 
to tin, iron and metal roofing, galvanized iron 
cornices, guttering, spouting and general job- 
bing and repairing. Mr. W. N. Kemp is s- 
native and lifelong resident of Randolph 
County and was born in 1S50. Although yet 
a young man, he has been for several years- 
prominently identified with the commercial 
interests and welfare of our city and at the 
present time holds the office of President of" 
the Winchester and State Line Turnpike. 
Mr. J. W. Jackson, also a native of this county,, 
was born in 1S4.1, and previous to the forma- 
tion of the present partnership was engaged in 
the agricultural business. He was in the 6otbi 
Regiment, Indiana volunteers, participating in 
many of the most prominent battles of the war. 

E. R. HIATT, 

Photographer. 
The photographic art gallery now so ably 
conducted by Mr. E. R. Hiatt, on North Main 
St., Winchester, has been occupied for similar 
purposes for nearly 15 years and under its- 
present management since 1SS0. The premi- 
ses occupied are admirably adapted for the 
purposes for which they are used, with strong,, 
clear sky and side lights with north exposure,, 
and the cameras, apparatus and appliances are 
first class in every particular, all the most ap- 
proved modern mechanical, chemical and 
scientific improvements being utilized and 
adopted simultaneously with their introduction 
in leading foreign and American galleries. 
The reception rooms, containing many ele- 
gant and artistic specimens of photography of 
Mr. Hiatt's production, are 20x30 feet" in 
dimensions and the operating rooms and 
apartments, devoted to the mechanical, chemi- 
cal, printing and finishing department, are 
20x40 feet in size. Mr. Hiatt makes a specialty 
of fine work in card, cabinet, panel and lite- 
size and also of copying and enlarging in a. 
variety of styles of finish, including India ink, 
crayon, oil and pastille. The pictures pro- 
duced at this gallery will not suffer by a criti- 
cal comparison with those of any similar 
establishment in the state and evince artistic 
ability, knowledge of perspective and the 
proper appreciation of the laws of light and 
shade as applied to this interesting and useful 
art. Mr. Hiatt is a native of this county, but 
resided for a number of years in the "West 
prior to becoming proprietor of this model 
establishment. 



158 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



B. F. BL'XDY, 

Dry Goods and Notions. 
Wherever civilization has gained a foothold 
and commerce established its imperial sway, 
the trade in dry goods has been among the 
first mercantile enterprises to spring into ex- 
istence, while in the older towns'and cities 
this branch of business will be found to occupy 
the most palatial establishments and engage 
the attention ot the most enterprising mer- 
chants. The city of Winchester furnishes no 
exception to this almost universal rule and 
among the leading houses may be especially 
mentioned that of Mr. B. F." Bundv, which 
has been conducted under its present'manage- 
ment since 1S75 ant * ,or three years previous 
to that time by Mr. O. Smith. "The premi-es 
■occupied are 2*oxSo feet in dimensions and the 
stock embraces a complete and comprehen- 
sive assortment of imported and American 
dry goods, domestics and linens, dress fabrics 
of the latest and most desirable styles, hosiery, 
gloves, notions, fancy goods and all varieties 
■of miscellaneous merchandise legitimately per- 
taining to this important department of our 
-commercial system. Mr. Bundy, who is a 
close and careful buyer and a thorough judge 
of values, purchases'in large quantities direct 
from importers, jobbers and manufacturers, 
and by special arrangements with the leading 
houses of New York and Philadelphia is 
enabled to display on his shelves and counters 
all the latest styles of seasonable novelties 
simultaneously with their appearance in the 
metropolitan markets. Mr. Bundv, who is a 
native and lifelong resident of this county, 
was born in 1S27 and has been for many years' 
prominently identified with the commercial 
interests of Winchester. 



county and had been engaged in the meat 
business for several years prior to the forma- 
tion of the present partnership. Mr. W. R. 
Heuston was also born in this county and was 
formerly engaged in commercial pursuits as a 
dealer in wood, coal, lime, etc., in this city. 
Both members ot the firm are well and favora- 
bly known in this community as upright, 
honorable merchants and enterprising, public 
spirited citizens, and the success which has 
attended their career in the present business 
has been the result of a business policy based 
on fair and honorable dealing. 



KNIGHT ^ HUESTON, 

Meat Market, Main St. 
The popular meat market on Main St., con- 
ducted by the enterprising firm of Knight & 
Hueston, was established in 1SS2 by Mr. 
Thomas Coffin, who was succeeded bv the 
present proprietors in July, 1SS3. The'main 
salesroom, which is 20x30 feet in dimensions, 
presents a neat and attractive appearance and 
the stock of fresh, salt and smoked meats is 
always first class, while in their appropriate 
seasons there will be found all varieties of 
poultry, sausage, bolognas, etc. In the rear 
ot the market proper the firm occupies three 
additional rooms, including finely arranged 
refrigerators or cooling rooms, ice" chest and 
packing room. They have their own chop- 
per, employing an engine and boiler of four 
horse power and manufacture their own 
sausage, bolognas, etc. They slaughter their 
own meats, selecting only the best of stock, 
and kill on an average about 20 beeves and a 
proportionate number of calves, hogs, sheep 
and other animals per month, employing in 
the sales, slaughtering and packing 'depart- 
ments three competent assistants. Mr. Nathan 
Knight is a native and lifelong resident of this 



JOHN W. DIGGS, 

Undertaker, North Main St. 
In 1S55 the firm of Helmes <i Diggs was 
established in this city for the purpose of con- 
j ducting a general cabinet and chair manufac- 
] tory and funeral undertaking business, and 
that partnership remained in lorce until 1S62, 
when the first named branch of the business 
was disposed of and in the following year Mr. 
John W. Diggs became sole proprietor and 
hassince that time conducted the undertaking 
business on his own account. This is the 
only establishment of its kind in the city, and 
thefacilities enjoyed by Mr. Diggs for under- 
taking the entire supervision of funerals are 
j not surpassed by those of anv contempora- 
1 neous establishment East or West. He has 
occupied the lot upon which his present sales- 
room is located for the past 20 years, where he 
carries constantly in stock a large line of 
coffins, caskets, burial cases, coffin trimmings, 
undertakers' supplies, etc. He has for the use 
of funerals two fine hearses and will supply 
carriages if desired at the most reasonable 
rates. Mr. Diggs is a native and lifelong resi- 
dent of this county. He has repeatedly been 
elected to positions of emolument and trust in 
the gift of his fellow citizens and for several 
years has served as Town and Township 
Trustee. In the conduct of his business he 
endeavors at all times to conform to the 
wishes of surviving friends and is thoroughly 
informed upon all matters pertaining to the 
branch of business in which he is en^a^ed. 



R. J. LITSCHERT, 

Watches, Clocks and Jewelry. 
When Mr. Litschcrt commenced business 
in this city in 1SS0, he was not only literally 
without capital but was actually compelled to 
run in debt for the fixtures of his establish- 
ment. Possessed of indomitable energy, 
perseverance and native force of character, he 
wasdetermined by the exercise of these traits, 
by industry and unswerving integrity in his 
transactions, to deserve and achieve success, 
and how well he has succeeded in his laudable 
endeavors may be appreciated from the fact 
that he now owns a comfortable residence, 
with other real estate interests, and carries in 
stock the most complete and elegant assort- 
ment of fine English and American watches, 
clocks, jewelry, solid silver and plated ware to 



CITY OF WINCHESTER. 



159 



"be found in Winchester, valued at not less 
than $;,ooo. He also transacts an extensive 
business in fine watch and jewelry repairing 
and his aggregate transactions will at the pres- 
ent time exceed those of any of his contempo- 
raries in the same branch of business. Mr. 
Litschert is a native of Ohio, where he was 
born in 1861. He is a practical jeweler and 
■watchmaker, thoroughly conversant with all 
the details of the business in its various 
.departments. 

•GEORGE S. DIGGS & WAY, 
Dry Goods, Notions, etc. 
One of the most complete, comprehensive 
.and desirable stocks of foreign and domestic 
■dry goods to be found in Winchester is that 
•carried by the firm of George S. Diggs & 
Way, whose spacious and elegantly arranged 
salesroom, 20x70 feet in dimensions, is located 
-one door from the southeast corner of the 
Public Square. This representative house 
was established in September, 1SS1, and from 
its very incipiency has received the liberal 
patronage and approbation of the citizens of 
this section, to whose interests special atten- 
tion has been paid in the selection of the 
stock, which embraces full lines of domes- 
tics, prints, ginghams, notions, fancy goods 
hosiery and underwear, white goods, iaces, 
ribbons, trimmings, ladies' and gentlemen's 
furnishing goods and miscellaneous merchan- 
dise of every description pertaining to this 
important department of trade. In the selec- 
tion of the finer varieties of goods for ladies' 
■wear, Mr. Diggs is ably assisted by his part- 
ner, Miss Lou Way, whose superior taste and 
judgment is universally acknowledged by 
the ladies of Winchester and vicinity. The 
average valuation of stock carried is about 
.$7,000 and the annual sales range from $20,000 
-to $25,000. This firm also handles large 
.quantities of butter, eggs and farm and dairy 
produce, which they receive in exchange 
■ for merchandise or purchase for cash at 
•the very highest ruling rates. Mr. Diggs 
and Miss Way are both natives and life- 
long residents of this section, where they 
.are favorably known in commercial and social 
circles, and their establishment is the recog- 
nized headquarters for fashionable dry goods 
.and trimmings. 



tages of purchases from the best sources enable 
them to offer inducements in prices and styles 
which will compare favorably with any con- 
temporaneous house in Ea>tern Indiana. In the 
rear is the general work room, where in addi- 
tion to giving speci.il attention to tastefully 
trimmed hats and bonnet*, they cor.-iu^t a 
dress and cloak making department, in \vhlch 
they insure neat and perfect fits and first cla-s 
work. They are in receipt of newest fashion 
plates from* Eastern cities and can, conse- 
quently, guarantee to their patrons perfect satis- 
faction in this department. 



C. C. MONKS, 
Meat Market. 

Extensively engaged in that special branch 
of commercial enterprise which is of para- 
! mount importance to prudent housekeepers 
j and heads of families, Mr. C. C- Monks, at his 
popular and well known meat market, oners 
to the citizens of Winchester and vicinity :n- 
\ ducements in both quality and price in fresh, 
j salt and smoked meats, poultry, game, sausage, 
etc., in their appropriate season. This is the 
oldest as well as most extensive establishment 
I of its class in the city, having for the past 15 
years enjoyed a liberal share of the public 
patronage and a reputation for fair ar.d hon- 
orable methods of dealing. Mr. Monks occu- 
pies for his sales department a room 20x55 
feet in dimensions, supplied with all the 
modern improvements and conveniences in 
the way of refrigerators, meat safes, cooling 
rooms, ice chests, marble counters, etc., ar.d 
slaughters annually to meet the requirements 
of his trade not less than 250 fine fat beeves 
and a large number of sheep, hogs, calves ar.d 
small stock. Mr. Monks, who is a native and 
lifelong resident of Indiana, was born in 1827. 
In addition to the business above mentioned 
he is proprietor of a fine farm near the city 
limits, which is in a high state of cu'tiva'ion 
and one of the most beautiful and fertile pieces 
of agricultural property in this section of the 
state. 



HOBBICK & McCOXNELL, 

Millinery and Dress Making, South 
Main St. 

The establishment now conducted by Mrs. 
Dora Hobbick and Miss Jennie McConnell 
was .originally started in August, 1SS2. The 
premises occupied are located on South Main 
St., where a room 20x45 feet in dimensions is 
occupied. The front part is devoted to the 
<lisplav of everv description of millinery goods, 
hats, bonnets, flowers, feathers, ribbons, trim- 
mings, etc., in which the latest stvles are 
found in season simultaneous with their ap- 
pearance in our Eastern cities, and the advan- 



J. W. GINGER, 
Gunsmith. 

The gun factory of Mr. J. W. Ginger, which 
was established in 1S66, is the only one in the 
city of Winchester and its patronage is derived 
from a wide, area 01 adjacent territory. Mr. 
Ginger, who is a native of Ohio County, Ind_, 
was born in 1S3S and when a voung man 
learned the trade of gunsmith, in which special 
branch of industrial art he has since become a 
most expert and skillful workman. At his 
establishment he makes a specialty of the 
manufacture of rifles and shot guns to order, 
the articles bearing his trade mark lelrg 
recognized as superior in workmanship ar.d 
reliability to those offered for sale by irre- 
sponsible dealers who persistently advertise 
"Cheap Guns." He also transacts a flourish- 
ing business in general repair work on all 
varieties of guns, pistols and fire arms, and as> 



160 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



an expert .locksmith he has few equals, being 
thoroughly conversant with the peculiar 
mechanism of all styles of safe-door, trunk and 
other locks, which he is prepared to put in 
order, furnish with keys and repair at short 
notice and on the most reasonable terms. 
His facilities for the expeditious transaction of 
general jobbing in I he above mentioned 
branches, as well as on all kinds of small 
machine work, are unsurpassed and persons 
entrusting work of any description to his 
hands may be assured of thorough and re'iable 
workmanship at reasonable prices. 



KELLER & MEIER, 

Grocery and Bakery. 
The family supply store of Keller & Meier, 
at No. 154 Main St., was established in 1S69 
by Mr. G. G. Kel'er. In 1S7S the firm name 
and stvle became Keller & Son and in 1SS0 as 
at present. The premises occupied at the 
above named location are 20x60 feet in dimen- 
sions, and in the grocery department may be 
found at all times a large and complete stock 
of the better varieties of staple and fancy gro- 
ceries, teas, coffees, spices, sugars, canned 
goods, foreign and domestic fruits, cigars, 
crockery and glassware, tobaccos and general 
merchandise pertaining to this special branch 
of trade, together with superior qualities of 
fresh family bread, cakes, pies, rolls, crackers, 
etc., of their own manufacture. The bakery 
department is a model of neatness in its way 
and is presided over by a skilled and expe- 
rienced baker, whose 'products are highly 
esteemed by our citizens for their uniform 
excellence and quality. In this department 
about four barrels of flour are used weekly and 
the trade of this establishment will compare 
favorably with that of any similar house in 
the city. Mr. G. W. Keller is a native of 
Crawford County, O., but has resided in Win- 
chester since 1S56, during the greater portion 
of which time he has been engaged in mercan- 
tile pursuits. Mr. J. C. Meier was born in 
Bavaria and came to the United States in 1S70. 
He learned the trade of baker in Cincinnati, 
O., and came to this city in 1S73. He was 
employed as a journeyman prior to the forma- 
tion of the present partnership and is thor- 
oughly conversant with all departments of 
the business. 



M. C. ALEXANDER & SON, 

Meat Market, South Side Public 

Square. 
The well known daily meat market of 
Messrs. M. C Alexander & Son is now in the 
fifth year of a prosperous and successful 
career. The premises occupied for market 
purposes are 22x50 feet in dimensions and are 
fitted up with an express view to the require- 
ments of the retail trade, with commodious 
and convenient refrigerators, meat safes, cool- 
ing rooms, ice chests, counters and all the 
modern conveniences. The members of the 
firm, who have both had many years expe- 



rience in this special branch of trade, devote 
their personal attention to the selection of" 
their stock and the general supervision of" 
their extensive business. They slaughter 
annually for their own trade not less than 150 
head of fat beeves, 150 hogs, from 30 to 50 
calves and a large number of sheep and other 
animals, the demand for which is not only of 
a local nature but extends to all sections of" 
the county. Mr. M. C. Alexander, who is a 
native of Kentucky, born in 1S27, has resided 
in this state for the past 35 years and for nearly 
a quarter of a century been prominently identi- 
fied with this special branch of trade. His son 
and partner, Mr. J. \V, Alexander, is a native 
and lifelong resident of Indiana and was edu- 
cated to the business in which he has been so> 
successful! v en^ra^ed. 



CONRAD MEYER, 

Restaurant and Lunch Room. 

Although established in its present location 
as recently as July, 1SS3, the eating house of 
Mr. Conrad Meyer already claims recognition 
and enjoys a good patronage. Mr. Meyer's- 
sales and eating rooms are iSx6o feet in 
dimensions, where may be found at all times- 
the best and freshest of bread, cakes, pies, etc.,. 
which are served to customers and patrons for 
home use or immediate consumption. This- 
room is in every respect a model of neatness 
and convenience and suggestive of the excel- 
lence of the creature comforts and delicacies- 
which emanate therefrom. Mr. Meyer is a 
native of Bavaria, Germany, born in 1840, and 
came to the L T nited States in 1S70. He is a 
practical baker, having learned his trade in the 
old country, where the system of apprentice- 
ship is much more rigid and thorough than in 
this. After landing at New York he was for 
a time engaged in the brewery business, when 
he proceeded to Cincinnati, O., and was em- 
ployed for several years in one of the leading 
bakeries of that city. Since the inception of" 
his present enterprise, Mr. Meyer has estab- 
lished a prosperous and successful trade. 



A. C CARVER, 

Drugs, Books, etc. 
While it is a self evident truism that there 
is no other nation which so fully appreciates 
the value or makes such intelligent use of 
drugs and pharmaceutical preparations as 
remedial agents, it is equally susceptible of 
demonstration that in no other country is 
there so high a degree of intelligence and 
thorough appreciation of their medicinal 
properties and virtues considered requisite in 
the business of dispensing the sime as in the 
United States, and on this account we find in 
every community, from the Atlantic to the 
Pacific coast, regularly educated and highly 
cultured physicians, devoting their attention 
to this important department of our commer- 
cial system rather than to the practice of their" 
profession. The city of Winchester forms no> 
exception to this almost universal rule of 



CITY OF WINCHESTER. 



161 



-American pharmacies, presenting in the estab- 
lishment of Dr. A. C. Carver a thoroughly 
•equipped and ably conducted house, where the 
purest and freshest varieties of drugs and 
•chemicals may always be obtained and where 
^special attention is devoted to the accurate 
preparation of physicians' prescriptions, family 
-recipes and pharmaceutical compounds by an 
•experienced chemist and physician, thoroughly 
•conversant with all the mysteries of materia 
jnedica and the medicinal properties of the 
-articles and ingredients employed. Dr. Car- 
ver, who commenced business in this city in 
1879, carries constantly in stock a full line of 
pure drugs, chemicals, proprietary remedies, 
paints, oils, varnishes, perfumeries, toilet arti- 
•cles, cigars, tobaccos, druggists' sundries and 
fancy goods, school and miscellaneous books, 
-^stationery, periodical literature, wall paper, etc. 
Dr. Carver is a native of Indiana and was born 
in 1S41. He is a regularly educated physi- 
cian of the allopathic school and practiced his 
profession with a marked degree ot success 
for about ten years prior to embarking in his 
present business, to which he now devotes his 
undivided attention. 

KNECHT & THOMAS, 
Jobbers ix Pumps. 
For a period of not less than 15 years the 
house of Knecht & Thomas has been engaged 
in che sale of the best varieties of water pumps 
.and automatic engines and supplies in Win- 
chester and is the only establishment of its 
-class in the city. Their sales and ware rooms, 
located on Main St., are -5x70 feet in dimen- 
sions and their stock embraces the most popu- 
lar styles and designs of apparatus for raising 
water from a lower to a higher level, either by 
hand or wind power, together with a great 
variety of pump makers' s'upplies, repairs, etc. 
Three assistants are employed in the sales 
• department, and the trade of this house is not 
•only of a local character but extends to all 
sections of the adjacent territory within a 
radius of from 70 to xoo miles. This firm dis- 
poses of from 4,000 to 5,000 pumps annually 
.and the facilities enjoyed by them for procur- 
ing supplies direct from manufacturers and 
supplying their customers either at wholesale 
-or retail are unsurpassed. The individual 
members of the firm, Mr. Wiliiam W. Knecht, 
.a native of Indiana, and Mr. J. W. Thomas, a 
native of Missouri, are thoroughly conversant 
with all the details of the business with which 
they have been so long and prominently 
identified and intending purchasers may im- 
plicitly rely upon any statements made by 
them or persons in their employ. 

•C. W. MOORE, 

Boots, Shoes and Groceries, North 
Main St. 

With an admirably selected assortment of 
boots and shoes for ladies', gentlemen's and 
children's wear, purchased direct from the 
leading manufacturers of the East with a 
.special view to the requirements of the trade 



in this section, and a complete line of the 
choicest varieties of staple and fancy family 
groceries, table and culinary supplies, garden 
grown teas, pure coffees and spices, foreign 
and domestic fruits, canned goods, etc. C. W. 
Moore confidently offers to his patrons and 
the citizens generally of Winchester and 
adjacent territory special inducements in 
quality, value and price, which a critical ex- 
amination will show cannot be readilv dupli- 
cated at any contemporaneous establishment 
in Eastern Indiana. Mr. Moore commenced 
business at his presentestablishmentin March, 
1SS0, and occupies a commodious and con- 
veniently arranged salesroom 20x45 teet in 
dimensions, with a stock of merchandise val- 
ued at not less than $4,000, which is kept con- 
stantly replenished by weekly arrivals from 
the leading trade centers of the Union, and 
transacts an annual business ranging from 
$12,000 to $15,000, making a leading specialty 
of the boot ar d shoe department. Mr. Moore 
is a native and lifelong resident of Indiana and 
was born in Delaware County. Previous to 
becoming a resident of Winchester he was 
engaged in mercantile pursuits at Selrr.a, in 
that county, where he conducted a boot and 
shoe and furnishing goods establishment for 
several years, becoming thoroughly conver- 
sant with the details of the business and its 
peculiarities in every department. 

CITY RESTAURANT, 

S. T. Re.mmel, Prop., North Main St. 

Among tho.~e enterprises which contribute 
in no small degree to the convenience and 
utility of a progressive community are our 
well conducted restaurants and eating houses. 
The establishment of S. T. Remmel was origi- 
nally established in the winter of 1SS3 on the 
north side of the Public Square and removed 
to its present location, on North Main St., soon 
after. The premises occupied consists of a 
neat and tastefully furnished room, which is 
constantly supplied with bread, pies, cakes, 
rolls, confectioneries, tobaccos, cigars, etc, 
with hot coffee and tea, supplying a substan- 
tial lunch at all times, with ovsters and ice 
cream in their season. Mr. Remmel, the pro- 
prietor of the City Restaurant, is a native of 
this county and state, where he was born in 
1S45. In 1S61 he enlisted in Companv D, 
79th Illinois Volunteer Infantry, serving in 
that gallant organization through the cam- 
paign of that regiment in Kentucky and Ten- 
nessee. In 1S63 he again enlisted, "in the ic 4 ;h 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and was 
placed on detachment duty in the U. ^. P.i'v 
Department, at Nashville, where he w ls in 
command of the guard of that depart::-. r.\. 
He was mustered out in 1S64 and honorablr 
ciischarged at Nashville. He then returned to 
Douglas Comity, 111., where he was engaged 
in agricultural pursuits up to 1S72, when he 
came to this city. Here he was engaged in 
the manufacture of brick and in other pursuits 
up to the time of engaging in his present busi- 
ness. 



162 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



A. BRINKLEY, 

Meat Market, North Main St. 
For a period of nearly 20 years Mr. A. 
Brinkley, proprietor of the well known meat 
market on North Main St, has been promi- 
nently identified with the business interests of 
this county as a merchant, stock dealer and in 
various mercantile capacities. In 1SS1 he es- 
tablished the market, which was from its very 
incipiency a decided success and where he 
now transacts a large and lucrative business, 
slaughtering annually not less than 150 beeves 
and a proportionate number of sheep, hogs, 
calves and small stock. The main salesroom, 
■which is 20x50 feet in dimensions, is fitted 
up in the neatest and most attractive manner, 
with all the modern improvements and con- 
veniences for the transaction of his extensive 
business, including a fine cooling room, re- 
frigerators, meat safes, counters, etc. Mr. 
Brinkley, who is a thorough judge of values 
in stock, selects his own animals and slaughters 
and dresses them at his own establishment, so 
that patrons may implicitly rely upon all rep- 
resentations made by him or his employes and 
be assured of securing the choicest varieties 
of meat at the lowest ruling rates. He also 
carries in stock the best of smoked and salt 
meats and in their appropriate seasons game, 
poultry, bologna, sausages, etc. Mr. Brinkley, 
who is a native of the state of Iowa, has re- 
sided in this county since 1S65 and been 
engaged in several commercial ventures, in- 
cluding the dry goods business, stock dealing, 
etc. In addition to the meat market above 
noticed, he still deals quite extensively in live 
stock at the present time, buying, selling and 
shipping to various points ot the East and 
West, and is regarded as one of our most 
enterprising citizens. 



adjacent territory. The ground space occu- 
pied for storage purposes at the location above 
named is 1 cox 100 feet in dimensions and the- 
stbck carried is full and complete in every 
department. Mr. Clevenger is a native and 
lifelong resident of Randolph County and was- 
born in 1S47. 



STEPHEN CLEVENGER, 

Coal, Wood, Lime, Cement, etc. 
The nature of the merchandise handled bv 
Mr. Clevenger at his office, warerooms and 
yards, corner of Meridian St. and the railroad, 
is of such a character as to ensure for his 
establishment the favorable consideration of 
all classes of the community and to commend 
this house to more than ordinary mention in 
the present statistical review of Winchester's 
commercial resources and advantages. This 
house was originally established in 1S75 by 
Jonathan Bartholomew, whose business was 
principally confined to the sale of lime. He 
was succeeded by Mr. D. M. Hewiston, who 
added numerous articles to the original list, 
including coal, wood, cement, chimney flues, 
sewer pipe, plaster-paris, plastering hair, fire 
clay, fire brick, terracotta lawn vases, etc. 
Mr. Clevenger purchased the interest of Mr. 
Hewiston in 1SS2 and as an additional feature 
of the business introduced that of stone for 
building and other purposes. This is the only 
establishment of the kind in the city and con- 
sequently the annua! transactions reach large 
sums and the trade extends to a wide area of 



MISS ELLA WAY, 

Millinery and Fancy Goods. 

The well known fashionable millinery house 
of Miss Ella Way, the leading one of its class 
in Winchester, was established about eight 
years ago and has from its verv incipiency 
been regarded by the ladies of Randolph 
County as the recognized headquarters for the 
latest styles and modes of elegant and fash- 
ionable headwear. Miss Way occupies a. 
commodious and handsomely furnished apart- 
ment 20x70 feet in dimensions for the display 
of her elegant and attractive stock and for the 
trimming department, in which four expe- 
rienced and artistic milliners are regularly 
employed and at certain seasons a mnch larger 
number. Here may be found in great profu- 
sion all the latest novelties in stylish hats and 
bonnets, ribbons, laces, flowers, feathers trim- 
mings, ornaments, etc., together with a com- 
plete assortment of ladies' fashionable furnish- 
ing and fancy goods adapted to the refined 
taste of the most cultured society. This 
establishment is especially noted among the 
ladies of Winchester and its environs for the 
elegance of its stock and the admirable taste 
displayed in the trimming department. By 
special arrangements with some of the leading 
modistes manufacturers and importers of the 
East, Miss Way is enabled to present to her 
patrons all the latest styles and novelties in 
Parisian and metropolitan hats, bonnets and 
trimming simultaneously with their appear- 
ance in metropolitan cities, advantages which 
cannot fail to meet the approbation of the 
ladies from whom she has in the past received 
such a liberal and gratifying patronage. 

J. L. STAKEBAKE, 
Furniture Dealer. 

Elegant and serviceable furniture has of late 
yeais become an indispensable requisite to 
those desirous of keeping pace with the pro- 
gressive spirit ot the age in the matter of home 
adornments and ornamentation, and the won- 
derful advances which have been introduced 
in the process of manufacture renders it possi- 
ble at the present period for even those of 
moderate means to furnish their houses in a 
style of comparative elegance at merely nomi- 
nal expense. The truth of this assertion may 
be verified by an examination of the stock and 
prices at the well known and popular em- 
porium of Mr. J. L. Stakebake, on the corner 
of Meridian and Franklin Sts., Winchester, 
wherein a commodious building 22x100 feet 
in dimensions, two entire floors are filled to 
their utmost storage capacity with an admira- 
bly and carefully selected assortment of fine 



CITY OF WINCHESTER. 



163 



and common furniture, parlor, drawing room ; 
and chamber suits, upholstered and common 
goods and, in fact, nearly every article re- 
quired at the present day for the furnishment 
of a house from basement to attic in elegant, 
comfortable and fashionable style. This rep- j 
resentative house was originally established 
about 12 years ago and came into the posses- • 
sion of the present proprietor in iS72,at which 
time he succeeded the firm of Welker & ! 
Winter. Mr. Stakebake is a native of Ohio 
but is an old resident of this state. He has, j 
since assuming the management and control 
of his present popular establishment, largely 
increased its trade and extended the scope of 
its operations, controlling at the present time 
a prosperous and established business through 
out this and adjoining counties. 



Sale Stables, 



JAMES HARTER, 

Livery, Feed and 
North Main St. 

Among the progressive operations which 
characterize the industries of the day, there 
are few which attract more general attention 
at home and abroad than our first class livery, 
feed and sale stables, contributing as they do 
to the pleasures and necessities of citizens and 
the traveling public. The present enterprise 
was originally started in April, 1SS2, by the 
present proprietor, taking possession immedi- 
ately upon the completion of the building by 
Mr. James Moorman. The building is 4OXS7 
feet in size and one and a half stories in height 
and has accommodations for 60 head of horses 
at one time. The building was constructed 



with direct reference to the present business 
and is one of the most perfectly arranged 
livery stables in this section of the state. Fine 
carriages, both single and double, buggies, etc., 
with reliable and good driving horses, are 
kept for the accommodation of the public. 
Carriages are supplied for weddings or funer- 
als and traveling men conveyed to distant 
points on reasonable terms; horses bought 
and sold or boarded by the feed, day or week. 
Mr. James Harter, the proprietor of these sta- 
bles, is a native of Union County, this state, 
where he was born in 1S22, though his early 
life was chiefly devoted to agricultural pur- 
suits in Butler County, O. About 1S34 he 
became associated with stage business, which 
he followed fur some years, up to about 1S42 
or 1S43, when he first engagtd in the livery 
business, being connected with it most of the 
time since then. The long experience he has 
enjoyed in this department justly entitles Mr. 
Harter to the full and extended notice here 
accorded and to liberal public consideration. 

Among the other more important firms 
doing business here are the following: 

Groceries, Drugs, Agricultural Im- 
plements, Stoves, etc. — Ballinger & Win- 
ter, G. H. Bowser, I. L Povner, J. W. 
Williams, Kizer & Co., W. W. Reed, Helms 
& Bishop, T. S. Gordon, C. E. Magee. 

Miscellaneous. — John Richardson, dry 
goods; Winchester Machine Works; R. 
Thornburg, tailor; T. W. Botkin, jeweler; 
Adam Hirsch, furniture; L. Snattinger, cloth- 
ing; J. A. Hinshaw & Son, harness; Franklin 
House. 



UNION CITY. 



Many of the towns of this county had 
:for several years been laid out and laid 
claim to prospective prominence before 



Unic 



Jity was thought of, while at the 



jpresent date there are no two towns in 
the county which with their combined 
population will equal that of this place. 

It is true it had the advantage of set- 
tlements in close proximity, and in its 
Antecedents was not so thoroughly identi- 
fied with struggling pioneer life as were 
"those towns of earlier date, but taking 
the character of the times which have 
.marked the era of its existence it has a 
claim to rapid growth and enterprise un- 
surpassed by any of its sister cities of the 
state. The town was originally laid out 
in 1849 by Hon. Jer. Smith, in connec- 
tion with Hon. O. H. Smith, the former 
residiug in this county and the latter a 
resident of Indianapolis. The original 
plat embraced lots on both sides of the 
•Ohio line. Very slow progress was made 
^nd little encouragement given during 
i;he first few years of the place ever at- 
■"taining any significance. Some dissatis- 
faction with the original laying out of the 
town resulted in its being re-platted in 
1852, at which time the name of Union 
-City was agreed upon as a recognition of 
its uniting Indiana and Ohio in its platted 
space. 

Among the earlier settlers in this sec- 
tion of the county we mention, Hon. Jere- 
miah Smith, Benj. Hawkins, Samuel Car- 
ter, Robert McKee, Simeon Branham, 
Joseph Turpin, Seth Hoke, Enos Turpin, 
Samuel Sutton, John Dozer, Jesse Pax- 
"ton, Dr. J. X. Converse, Dr. Williamson, 
Col. Isaac Gray, Judge Rulong, Henry 
Debolt and Dr. Noah SininionSj though 
many of these have since deceased or re- 
moved to other sections. 

The first house built was in the winter 
of 1849 and 1850. It was erected by Mr. 
•Georj-p Ensminser, and stood near what 



is now the corner of Howard and Oak 
streets. The first saw mill was on the 
Ohio side, put up by Mr. Van Garr in 
1852. The first school was held near 
what is now the northeast corner of How- 
ard and Oak streets, in the fall of 1853; 
it was a private school, and was taught by 
Miss Mary Ensminger. The first public 
school was taught bv Mr. George Brain- 
ard, in the winter "of 1853-4. The first 
store on the Ohio side was opened by 
Joseph Turpin in 1852; Mr. Benj. Haw- 
kins had the first store on the Indiana 
side, but near the same time Mr. Jonas 
"Ward had a store on the Ohio side and 
afterward came ro the Indiana side. 

It may be mentioned here that this is 
the nearest the facts we have been able to 
find, but that there exists in the minds of 
some, a doubt as to who has a prior claim 
to the first store:— [Editor.] 

The first church was the Baptist, which 
was erected in 1853; it was subsequently 
destroyed by fire and the present church 
building erected upon the same site. Dr. 
Twifort was the first physician, 1853; 
Wm. Anderson started the first black- 
smith shop, and Mr. John Farson the 
first wagon shop, about the same year. 
Judge Rulong was the first postmaster. 

These are all the essential facts required 
in a work more strictly devoted to the 
industries and leading avocations of this 
city and county and give the practical 
foundation to the subsequent rapid growth 
of 

UXIOX CITY AS AT PRESENT. 

In point of population, manufacturing 
and commercial enterprise we must ac- 
cord to this city the chief position in the 
county. Union City now contains a 
population closely approximating 5,000 in- 
habitants, of which about 1.200 are upon 
the Ohio side. In 1870 the census report 
gave it a population of 1,439, in 1880, 
2,4~H, but the opening of new and im- 



UNION CITY. 



165 



portant manufacturing enterprises have 
since that time largely contributed to its 
growth. It is supplied with (Holly) wa- 
ter works, and without doubt will ere 
long enjoy the advantages of gas. 

It has six churches, viz.: M. E. Church, 
.Lutheran, United Brethren, Christian, 
TJniversalist, and Catholic. There is a 
iineHigh School building, besides schools 
held in other sections of the city. 

Union City was incorporated in 1860. 
It is ten miles distant from the county 
seat and eighty-five miles from both In- 
dianapolis, and Columbus, Ohio. It is 
the western terminus of the D. ct U. R. 
R., and upon the line of the P. C. & St. 
L., and the C. C. C. & I. Railways, giving 
to it as fine railroad and shipping facili- 
ties to all points as could be desired. 

There are two weekly papers published 
here, each of which have a liberal patron- 



age and circulation; both of which e 
ploy steam power, and are Republican in 
politics. The Union City Timet was es- 
tablished in 1870, and came into the 
hands of Mr. Geo. W. Patched, the pres- 
ent editor and proprietor, in 1877. The 
paper is nine column folio, and has a cir- 
culation of 1,380. The Union City Eagle 
was one of the first papers published in 
the county, and is now conducted by 
Messrs. Ensegu & Bel! as editors and pro- 
prietors. It has a circulation of 1,800. 
As to its leading industries the pages 
of this work will furnish ample proof of 
its importance and prosperity. Situated 
in the midst of a fine agricultural district 
upon the highest ground in the state, 
Union City commends itself not only by 
its enterprise, but in its educational ad- 
vantages, religious privileges and health- 
ful location. 



CITIZENS' BANK. 

This popular and thoroughly reliable finan- 
cial and fiduciary institution has now been in 
successful operation nearly 20 years (having 
been established in 1S65), during which period 
it has won a high degree of public favor and 
confidence as a safe, solid and substantial 
bank. Its originaj projectors and founders 
were Hons. Cadwalladar and Gray,. by whom 
it was conducted as a srivate banking house 
until March, 1S73, when it was incorporated 
under the laws of the state of Indiana with an 
authorized capital of $32,000, surplus $S,ooo. 
Its present officers are Hon. N. Cadwalladar, 
President; Hon. Isaac P. Grav, Vice Presi- 
dent; Charles H. Cadwalladar, Cashier; Geo. 
N. Edger, Assistant Cashier, and M. N. East- 
man, Teller, with a Board of Directors com- 
posed of the following well known capitalists 
and business men: N. Cadwalladar, Isaac P. 
Gray, E. M. Tansey and W. K. Smith, gentle- 
men of established reputation and recognized 
ability in the management of their personal 
affairs, which is a sufficient guarantee of their 
fitness for the duties of the responsible posi- 
tions which they have so efficiently and 
acceptably filled. In addition to their admira- 
ble business qualifications and financial ability, 
the management and directory are thoroughly 
familiar with the various industrial and com- 
mercial enterprises of this city and state, and 
business of any legitimate character entrusted 
to the Citizens' Bank will receive prompt, 
careful and intelligent attention. The bank, 
in addition to the various branches of domestic 
banking, deposits, discounts, collections, etc., 
issue drafts on all the principal cities of 
Europe on sums to suit purchasers and settlers 
of credit on London and the Continental 
cities, devoting special attention to this branch 
of the business. The management is and has 



been marked by a safe and conservative policy, 
which has greatly aided the strength and 
standing of the institution, and, altogether, the 
Citizens' Bank is conceded to be one of the 
most de-irable monetary concerns in Indiana 
with which to establish "business relations. 



C. G. KENNEDY, 

Groceries, Wines and Liquors, East 
Pearl St. 

The popular grocery and liquor house of C. 
G. Kennedy, on Ea-t Pearl St., was founded 
in 1S66 by Mr. P. G.Kennedy, who conducted 
the business successfully until 1S75, when he 
was succeeded by the present proprietor. The 
premises occupied tor salesroom are 20x65 feet 
in dimensions, where may be found a choice 
and carefully selected assortment of staple and 
fancy groceries, teas, coffees, spices, sugars, 
syrups, cigars, tobaccos, canned goods and 
grocers' sundries generally, together with a 
fine line of the purest brands of imported and 
American wines, gins, brandies, etc., and the 
most popular varieties of old ne and bourbon 
whiskies, especially desirable on account of 
their purity for family or medicinal purposes 
or for u<e as beverages by the convivially in- 
clined. Mr. Kennedy purchases direct from 
importers, manufacturers and jobbers, and 
being a competent judge of values is enabled 
to guarantee that all articles sold bv him are 
exactly as represented. Mr. Kennedy, who is 
a native of Ireland, came to the United States 
in 1S67 and located in Union City the sane 
year. He has been continuously "engaged in 
the grocery and liquor trade either as salesman 
or on his own account since that time. His 
transactions are not confined to the retail 
trade, as lie is rapidly building ip a flourish- 
ing wholesale b\ ;iness, espc '.ally in the wine 
and liquor Jepart merit. 



166 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



ALEX. A. KNAPP & CO., 

Jobbers of Sewer Pipe, Fire Brick, 
Fire Clay, Terra Cotta Goods, 
Vases, Statuary, Imported and 
American Cements, Plaster Paris, 
etc., Iron and Lead Pipe, Iron Pipe 
Fittings, Cast Iron Sinks, Brass 
Goods, Babbitt Metal, Steam Guages 
and a General Line of Plumbers' 
and Machinists' Supplies. 

The steadily increasing demand on every 
side for improved mechanical devices pertain- 
ing to labor saving machinery tor a great 
variety of purposes has necessitated the estab- 
lishment in our principal trade centers of. 
depots of supply where the various styles 
which practical experience has demonstrated 
to be the best may be obtained, and it is a 
source for congratulation that manufacturers 
in this section are no longer compelled to go 
to distant markets for their needful supplies. 



since in Union City exists an establishment 




•where the best varieties of mill, engineers', 
plumbers' and machinists' supplies may be 
procured at manufacturers' prices. Of course 
reference is made in this connection to the 
representative establishment of Messrs. Alex. 
A. Knapp & Co., manufacturers' agents for 
the celebrated Champion Force Pump. They 
are also agents for Shultz's patent raw hide 
belting and lace leather and jobbers of a great 
variety of articles pertaining to mill supplies 
too numerous to mention in the limits of the 
present work, save in a general way, as lace 
leather and belting, rubber belting, packing 
hose and tubing, belt rivets and punches, 
couplings, valves, guage and stop cocks, steam 
and water guages, babbitt metal, lead and iron 
pipe, iron and wood pumps, stocks, dies, tongs, 
vices and a full line of pipe fitters' tools, all 
kinds of cast and malleable iron fittings for 
water, gas and steam, asbestos, wick, rope 
and mill board packing, Italian and Russian 
hemp packing, mineral wool, Steu art's ready 
roofing, American and imported cement, to- 



gether with a great variety of articles of simi- 
lar nature, embracing mill and machinists'" 
supplies of every description. They are also- 
extensive dealers in sewer pipe, fire brick, fire 
clay and all kinds of terra cotta goods, includ- 
ing an elegant and artistic assortment of lawn, 
yard, park and cemetery vases and pedestals,, 
ornamental fountains, statuary in minature 
and life size and a great variety of articles- 
from this material of utility and beauty for 
house, portico or out door adornment. Inthis- 
line this is the largest and most important 
establishment in the state, and of the single 
item of sewer pipe alone they dispose of 
annually more than 75 carloads. The premi- 
ses occupied for business purposes comprise 
one main building used for offices and sales- 
room 20x80 feet in dimensions, a two story 
warehouse for storage of stock 20x50 feet in 
size and an additional structure occupied as 
warehouse 20x76 feet in size, with ample and 
commodious ground space for the storage of 
non-perishable articles. This house was es- 
tablished in 1S74 by the senior 
member of the firm and the 
present style was adopted in. 
May, 1S83, by the admission. 
^ of Miss Francis R. Knapp, 
laughter of the founder, to an 
interest in the business. Miss- 
Knapp is an accomplished ac- 
countant, correspondent and 
j bookkeeper and upon her de- 
volves the general manage- 
ment of the office, financial 
and clerical department of the- 
business- It is simply a mat- 
ter of duty which we most 
cheerfully perform to state in 
this connection that she is ad- 
*2j mirably qualified by educa- 
- J tion and experience for the 
e^^^l - ._ A responsible position which she 
so efficiently fills. Captain 
Alex. A. Knapp is a native of 
Ohio and was born in Wayne County in 1S37- 
His early life was spent in Mansfield, O. He 
has been a resident of Indiana since 1S69 and 
during this period has been engaged in com- 
mercial pursuits and for a greater portion of 
the time prominently identified with the 
growth, development and progress of the mer- 
cantile interests of Union City. During the 
war of the rebellion he was among the first to 
respond to the call of the President for troops 
to protect the honor of our flag and the integ- 
rity of the Union and enlisted as a private 
soldier in the 17th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, a 
three months organization, and at the expira- 
tion of the term of service (August, 1S61,) was 
honorably discharged. With the commission 
of Second Lieutenant, granted October, 24th, 
iSf-i, he recruited a company which was 
assigned as Company K, to 40th O. V. 1. In 
November, 1S61, he was commissioned as 
Captain of same company, retaining this com- 
mand until his resignation, in March, 1S64, at 
Blue Springs, Tenn. He served in the grand 

f 



UNION CITY. 



167 



old Army of the West, under the command of 
General Garfield, participating in the eventfu 
campaigns and engagements of 1S61, '62, '63, 
and '64. Among the most no'ed engage- 
ments in which that gallant army distinguished 
itself may be mentioned Middle Creek, Ky., 
January 10th, 1S62, and Pound Gap, Ky., 
March 16th, 1S62. After his transfer to the 
Army of the Cumberland (February, 1S63,) he 
participated in the first battle of Franklin, 
Tenn., (April, 1663,) and in all the battles 
under General Rosecranz up to and inclusive 
of Battle of Chickamauga, where he was disa- 
bled by his horse falling on him. He was 
discharged with the rank of Captain in Feb- 
ruary, 1S64, for injuries received at Chicka- 
mauga. He has not and probably never will 
recover from the effects of the injuries re- 
ceived upon that field of bloody strife. 



COONS BROS., 

Proprietors "Bowers' Emporium." 
One of the most extensive and important 
business houses of Eastern Indiana and one 
■which has for more than a score of years been 
regarded with marked consideration by the 
residents of Union City and its environs is 
familiarly known to all classes of the commu- 
nity as "Bowers' Emporium," under which 
appropriate designating title it has become one 
of the most favorably regarded institutions of 
our enterprising community, of which the city 
may well feel proud and which is in every- 
way deserving of the liberal patronage and 
generous support accorded during the two 
decades of its management under the judicious 
and effective administration of its original 
founder, Mr. A. J. S. Bowers, one of Union 
City's most energetic and public spirited mer- 
chants, and of his successors, Messrs. Coons 
Bros., who have since January, 1SS3, main- 
tained the high standard of commercial integ- 
rity and enterprise that characterized the 
career of this representative establishment 
under their highly esteemed predecessor. 
This firm occupies for business purposes three 
entire floors, each 35x123 feet in dimensions, 
of the elegant Emporium Building, on Colum- 
bia St., employing in the different departments 
25 salesmen and assistants and transact an 
annual business of more than $150,000, with a 
trade derived from the city and adjacent terri- 
tory within a radius of 20 or 25 miles. The 
stock consists of a complete and comprehen- 
sive assortment of foreign and domestic dry 
goods, notions, ready made clothing, carpets, 
hats, caps, ladies' and gentlemen's furnishing 
goods and miscellaneous merchandise pertain- 
ing to' the above named branches of trade. 
They also make a specialty of merchant tailor- 
ing and in this department turn out some 
elegant suits and garments, which will not 
suffer by comparison, either in material, style, 
workmanship or finish, with those of lead'ing 
metropolitan establishments, while, owing to p 
their extensive business and unrivalled facili- 
ties, their prices are uniformly much lower 
than similar articles can be purchased in the 



more pretentious cities. The individual mem- 
bers of the present firm are Isadore, Gus. and 
Samuel W. Coons, brothers and natives of 
Pennsylvania. They are young, energetic 
and reliable gentlemen of ripe business experi- 
ence, possessing intelligence, ample capital 
and unrivalled facilities for the successful 
prosecution of their extensive business in all 
departments. 

STEWART & WRIGHT, 

Groceries, Produce, Feed and Salt, 

Cor. Pearl and Broadway. 
One of the largest grocery houses in this 
section of the state and with possibly a single 
exception the oldest in Union City, is that 
now conducted by the enterprising firm of 
Stewart <& Wright, whose sales and ware 
rooms are located at the corner of Pearl St. 
and Broadway. This representative house 
was founded in August, 1S60, Mr. B. F. 
Stewart being the junior partner at that time. 
In 18S2 the present partnership was formed by 
the admission of Mr. John T. Wright to an 
interest in the business. The building occu- 
pied at the above named location was erected 
by Mr. Stewart in 1S67 on the same site occu- 
pied by the original firm in 1S60. It com- 
prises two rooms each 25x40 feet in dimen- 
sions, where five salesmen and assistants are 
employed. The stock carried, which is full 
and complete in every department, embraces 
a general assortmeut of staple and fancy gro- 
ceries, provisions, farm and dairy produce, 
flour, mill feed, salt, etc., the average valuation 
of which is not less than $3,000 and the 
annual transactions reach an aggregate of 
more than $30,000. Messrs. Stewart & 
Wright are probably the most extensive deal- 
ers in country produce in the state, outside of 
Indianapolis, and in the one item of apples 
alone they handled during the past season 
more than S.500 bushels. They also deal ex- 
tensively in potatoes, and in fact all kinds of 
produce and corn, shipping large quantities. 
In the grocery department they possess unsur- 
passed facilities for procuring their supplies, 
and roast and grind their own coffees. Thev 
have one of the finest refrigerating rooms in 
the state for the storage of perishable mer- 
chandise, and handle the entire products of 
six flouring mills in the states of Indiana and 
Ohio. In every department of their extensive 
business the aim of this representative firm is 
to ''lead rather than compete" and thev are 
determined to allow no contemporaneous 
house in Eastern Indiana to surpass them in 
any particular. Mr.BF.W. Stewart, one of our 
pioneer merchants and most highly honored 
and respected citizens, is a native of'Hamilton, 
O., but removed to Darke County, O., with 
fhis parents when but two years of age. Prior 
to embarking in his present business as above 
noted he was engaged in agricultural pursuits 
and in the slaughtering business, and since 
becoming a resident of Union City he has 
been prominently identified not only with its 
mercantile interests, but with its growth, 



168 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



development and material prosperity in a 
great variety of ways. He is a prominent 
member of the Christian Church, of which 
denomination he is an elder. His partner and 
present business associate, Mr. John T. Wright, 
is a native of Indiana and an old resident ot" 
Union City. 

STARBUCK BROTHERS, 
Druggists. 
These enterprising and accomplished phar- 
macists conduct two rirst class establishments 
in different sections of the city, which will be 
considered in the order of their seniority. 

THE UPPER STOKE, 

as it is familiarly known, is located in the 
Hartzell Building" No. 41 Columbia St., two 
door- south of "Bowers' Emporium," where a 
spacious and elegantly equipped salesroom, 
-with laboratory and storage warehouse in the 
rear, covering a ground space of 20X1S5 feet, 
is occupied for general business purposes. 
This is the general headquarters of the firm 
and here are received and stored the supplies 
for both establishments. The s-ales depart- 
ment is fitted up in modern metropolitan style, 
with the most artistic and attractive fixtures 
and accessories known to the trade, and the 
stock embraces a general and comprehensive 
line of the purest and freshest drugs and 
chemicals, paints, oils, varnishes, dye stuffs, 
wall papers and interior decorations, in which 
line they carry one of the most comprehensive 
stocks "to be found in the s'ate of newest 
designs, all the standard and reliable proprie- 
tary remedies of the day, toilet articles and 
perfumeries, Havana and domestic cigars, 
manufactured tobaccos, wines and liquors tor 
medicinal purposes, fancy articles and drug- 
gists' sundries generally. This house was 
established in 1S72 by J. M. Jaynes, who was 
succeeded by the following named firms in the 
order here given: Starbuck Jc Commons, 
Starbuck & Thompson, J. W. Starbuck & Son 
and Starbuck Bros., the present proprietors, 
who assumed the entire management of the 
business of both houses in May, 1SS3. The 
average valuation of stock carried at this 
establishment is not less than $3,ooo and the 
annual transactions will range from $25,000 to 
$30,000. Mr. James M. Starbuck, an accom- 
plished chemist and pharmacist of extended 
experience and acknowledged ability, has gen- 
eral charge of this house, assisted by three 
competent and efficient salesmen. 

THE LOWER STORE, 

located at the northea-t corner of Pearl and 
Columbia Sts., is under the immediate super- 
vision of Mr. W. II. Starbuck. a member of 
the firm, and was founded in 1S79 by J. Star- 
buck & Son., who were succeeded in 1SS3 by 
the present firm. A finely furnished and con- 
veniently arranged salesroom 25x45 feet in 
6ize, with b.i-ement of the same dimensions, is 
occupied, and the stock, like that of the 
"Upper Store," embraces a full line of mer- 
chandise pertaining to this special branch of 
commercial enterprise, valued at about $3 000, 



while the annual transactions will exceed 
$10,000. At both establishments a prominent 
specialty is made of the accurate compounding 
of physicians' prescriptions, family recipes and 
pharmaceutical compounds by practical and 
skilled pharmacists and only the purest and 
best ingredients are used. The individual 
members of the firm, Messrs. James M. and 
William II. Starbuck, ai;e natives of Wayne 
County, Ind., but have resided in Union City 
since 1S6S, having received thorough practical 
education in the business in which they are 
engaged 

PETER KUNTZ, 

Lumber, Doors, Sash, Blinds, etc., 
Union City has of late years acquired a wide- 
spread reputation as a leading lumber market 
largely through the representative house of 
Mr. Peter Kuntz, which was founded in 1S67 
on a comparatively small scale, the transac- 
tions of the first _\ear not exceeding $100,000. 
The stimulus given to this enterprise may be 
indicated when it is stated that the present 
transactions of this house will aggregate more 
than $400,000. As an indication of the obsta- 
cles which have beset the energies of Mr. 
Kuntz, it should be noticed here that on the 
4th of May, 1SS3, a disastrous fire occurred, 
which destroyed buildings and property belong- 
ing to him amounting to about $225,000. 
Undaunted by this terrible disaster, Mr. Kuntz 
lost no time but immediately proceeded to the 
erection of a new and equally commodious 
buildings for stornge purposes, and i.i a re- 
markably short time recovered the ground lost 
and placed his works in most perfect and 
efficient condition. Mr. Kuntz now occupies 
for storage purposes and lumber yards a 
ground space of 200x1,900 and 140x400 feet 
in dimensions, the latter on the Ohio side, a 
substantially constructed brick building four 
stories in height and 90x122 feet in size and 
another three stories high and icoxioo feet in 
dimensions. In addition to these he owns and 
conducts two planing mills, respectively 60x100 
and 50x75 feet in dimensions, equipped with 
latest improved wood working machinery for 
the manufacture of doors, sash, blinds, frames, 
mouldings, brackets, etc , which are furnished 
to builders and contractors throughout this 
and adjoining counties in both Indiana and 
Ohio, besides more remote sections. The 
motive power for the machinery employed at 
his works is supplied by one 150 horse power 
engine and boiler and an average force of 100 
workmen find employment in the different 
departments of his extensive business. Mr. 
Kuntz is a native of Germany, where he was 
born in 1S39. He came to this country in 
1842 and first lived at Greenville, O., and has 
been a resident of this state for the past iS 
years. The architect of his own fortunes, he 
has, largely by his own unaided efforts and 
ability, carved "his way to the topmost round or 
commercial enterprise and to him Eastern 
Indiana is largely indebted for one of the most 
complete establishments of its class in the state. 



UNION CITY. 



169 



THE COMMERCIAL BANK, 
No. 44 Columbia St. 
Originally established in 1865 as the "First 
National Bank of Union City" by the late 
Edward Starbuck and James Moorman, the 
Commercial Bank was reconstructed in 1S77 
under its present title, since which time the 
success of the institution has been so pro- 
nounced as to entitle it to rank among the first 
financial and fiduciary establishments of the 
great sta e of Indiana. With a capital stock 
of $60,000, increased December 1st, 1883, to 
$100,000, a surplus and undivided dividends of 
more than $10,000 and a large line of deposits, 
it may readily be seen that the "Commercial" 
has been governed by a safe and conservative 
policy, rejecting upon its management and 
directory the highest degree of credit. Each 
employe of the bank is a stockholder and has 
therefore a personal interest in its welfare and 
prosperity. The preset officers of the bank are 
J. R. Jack-on, President, and J. F. Rubey, 
Cashier. The Commercial Bank transacts a 
general banking business in loans, deposits, 
discounts, exchanges and collections, with 
correspondents in all the principal cities of the 
Union, and being remarkable for the prompt 
systematic method upon which its affairs are 
managed, is an institution which fitly repre- 
sents solvency and success. 



TURPEN & HARRIS, 

Wholesale Produce Dealers. 
The numerous important enterprises with 
which the firm of Turpen & Harris are identi- 
fied in Union City necessitates frequent men- 
tion in these pages of that representative firm. 
That special branch of their extensive business 
operations which forms the subject matter of 
the present editorial notice, the wholesale pro- 
duce trade, is probably the most important, in 
a financial point of view, of any of the numer- 
ous industrial and commercial enterprises 
which engage the attention of our merchants, 
the annual transactions of the firm in this 
branch of business alone aggregating more 
than $1,000000, with a trade not confined to 
the limits of our own country, but extending 
to England and other nations of the old world. 
An approximate idea of the importance and 
magnitude of their transactions may be gleaned 
from the fact that this firm handles daily on 
an average more than 15,000 pounds of butter, 
16,000 dozen of eggs and immense quantities 
of poultry in season. They occupy a spacious 
refrigerator house of improved special con- 
struction for the storage of butter, eggs and 
poultry during the summer season, with a 
capacity of 4,000 barrels at one time and 700 
tons of ice for preserving an even tempera- 
tuae of 36 deg. Fahrenheit. The produce 
handled by tnis firm is gathered by them from 
producers, farmers and country merchants in 
Ohio and Indiana in their own conveyances, 
within a radius of 50 miles and by railroads 
from more distant points. The butter, with 
the exception of "creamery" brands, is all re- 



packed by scientific processes, and the trade- 
mark of Turpen & Harris is regarded by 
dealers in the seaboard cities as a guarantee of 
excellence and standard of values. This rep- 
resentative establishment, which was found- d 
by its present proprietors in 1S66 upon a com 
paratively small scale, has steadily increased 
until the magnitude of its present transactions 
and the scope of its operations exceeds that of 
anv contemporaneous establishment West and 
furnishes employment to a force of from 20 to 
40 assistants, according to the season and the 
exigencies of the trade. This is one of the 
most important of our vitalizing commercial 
institutions and not only a credit to the ability 
and enterprise ot its projectors and proprietors, 
but of vast benefit to the commercial thrift 
and prosperity of our inland metropolis, pos- 
sessing as it does both state and national 
importance. 



WILLIAM KERR, 

General Hardware, Stoves, etc., No. 

37 Columbia St. 
One of the oldest and most prominent 
houses of Union City engaged in this impor- 
tant department of trade is that conducted by 
Mr. William Kerr, whose extensive warehouse 
and salesrooms are among the finest in the 
state, located at No. 37 East side Columbia 
St., where two entire floors and basement each 
25x185 feet in dimensions are utilized for the 
display and storage ot one of the most com- 
plete and comprehensive stocks of merchan- 
dise in this line to be found in the state, 
consisting of general heavy and shelf hard- 
ware, the best makes of heating and cooking 
stoves, builders' hard.vare, farmers' and me- 
chanics' tools and agricultural implements 
and machinery, farm wagons, tin, copper and 
sheet-iron ware, etc. Mr. Kerr also makes a 
specialty of tin and iron roofing, guttering, 
spouting and general jobbing in this line. 
This representative house was established by 
its present proprietor in 1S69 without capital 
or means save what he had accumulated by 
industry and economy during three years 
labor as a journeyman, and what is better than 
money, a stout heart, willing hands and a 
determination to deserve and win success by 
application to his business and honorable 
methods of dealing. For the first three years 
of his business career his annual transactions 
ranged from $5.oock to $S,oco, while at the 
present time his sales will exceed $25,000 and 
are steadily increasing with each succeeding 
year, with a trade extending throughout this 
and adjacent counties in Indiana and Ohio. 
Mr. Kerr, who is a native of Pennsylvania, 
was born in 1S43 but came to this state with 
his parents when but eight years of age. He 
is a practical tinsmith and metal worker and 
from the time of embarking in his present 
business until 1S77 made that a special feature 
of his trade. At that time he introduce..! the 
hardware and agricultural implement depart- 
ment and his trade has been marked by a 
constant and gradual growth. 



170 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



HANEY & BUFFINGTON, 

Agricultural Implements, etc. 
One of the oldest bu-iness houses of Union 
City and the leading one in this special branch 
of trade is that now conducted by the firm of 
Haney and Burrlngton, which was established 
more than 20 years ago by the present senior 
member of the firm and which was conducted 
successfully by him as an individual enter- 
prise until 1SS1, when the present partnership 
was formed. This firm handles the leading 
varieties of agricultural implement*, tools. 
machinery and farm wagons and represent as 
exclusive agents in this section many of the 
most prominent manufacturers of the Union, 
among which may be especially mentioned 
the Weir Plow Company, of Monmouth, 111., 
the De Long & Alstatter Plow Company, of 
Hamilton, O., the Minnesota '-Chief" Thresher, 
and Improved Wheat Drills, manufactured by 
Rude Bros., of Liberty, Ind., and three differ- 
ent makes of wagons, including the most 
popular and reliable stvles now before the pub- 
lic. Mr. Jacob Haney is a native of Ohio, in 
which state he was born in 1S1S. He has 
been a resident of Union City for more than 
two decades and has been prominently identi- 
fied with its commercial and industrial inter- 
ests in other branches ot business than the one 
above referred to. In connection with other 
parties he was for several years engaged in the 
furniture business, also the grocery tra le, and 
is at the present time a stockholder in the 
Cook Stove Heat Fender Company, one of 
our prominent industries, noticed at length 
under its appropriate head on another page. 
Mr. John Buffington, a!*o a native of Ohio, 
was born in 1858 but has resided in Union 
City for some years. This firm is one of our 
most enterprising and reliable. 

L. T. BUCKINGHAM, 

Harness Manufacturer. 
At the establishment of Mr. L. T. Bucking- 
ham, whose factory and salesrooms are located 
on Oak St., may always be found a fine stock 
of single and double hand made harness of his 
•own manufacture, collars, saddle*, bridles and 
horse clothing and equipments of all de-crip- 
tions. Mr. Buckingham, who is a practical 
harness maker, was born in Darke County, 
O., in 1S5S, but has resided in Indiana for the 
past 15 years. He established his present suc- 
cessful business enterprise in July, 18S3, at 
which time he succeeded v Mr. E.J. Harshman, 
who had conducted it for six vears previously 
at this location, where he occupies for sales 
and manufacturing purposes one floor 20x50 
feet in dimensions and transacts an annual 
business of about §6000. Mr. Buckingham 
manufactures light single harness at prices 
ranging from $9 to $35 and light double har- 
ness from $20 to $40, one-horse work harness 
from $14 to $25 and two-horse working har- 
ness from $iS to $35. The work turned out 
her is noted for the excellence ot material used 
and for the reliability of workmanship. He 
also gives special attention to all repairing. 



CHARLES PRIOR, 

Livery, Feed and Sale Stable, East 

Paul St. 
These well known stables were established 
by the present proprietor in 1878 and rapidly 
won their way to public favor and popular 
estimation. The buildings, which are 45x100 
feet in dimensions, have ample and excellent 
accommodations for 24 horses at one time and 
special attention is devoted to buying, selling 
or exchanging horses and to the sale of stock 
on commission and to boarding horses by the 
feed, day or week. Mr. Prior keeps eight or 
ten fine horses in the livery department, with 
stylish and comfortable carriages, buggies and 
road wagons and can furnish rigs for business 
or pleasure excursions on short notice and 
upon the most reasonable terms. Mr. Prior 
is a native of Germany but came to the United 
States when but eight years of age and with 
his parents located in Franklin County, O. 
He enlisted in the Union Army in 1S61 as a 
member of the 32d Ohio Volunteers, a three 
years organization, and with that command 
participated in the battles of Greenbrier, Alle- 
ghany, Cross Keys and Harper's Ferry, in 
which engagement he was captured by the 
enemy and subsequently paroled and sent to 
Chicago, where his exchange was effected and 
he rejoined his regiment, at that time in the 
Department of the West. He was actively 
engaged during the memorable Vicksburg 
campaign, terminating with the siege and cap- 
ture of the city by the forces under Grant. 
In the winter of 1S63 64 he came home on a 
veteran furlough for the purpose of re-entering 
the service, but on account of wounds received 
in action at Alleghany Mountain he was re- 
jected by the examing board. He subse- 
quently enlisted in the 7th Michigan Battery of 
Light Artillery and after participating in the 
eventful Atlanta Campaign was honorably 
discharged at Louisville in 1S64. He became 
a resident of Union City in 1S65 and prior to 
embarking in his present enterprise was en- 
gaged in the manufacture and sale of carriages. 

A. B. DUNKEL, 

Groceries, Columbia St. 
Among the representative houses in this 
special department of our commercial system 
is that conducted by Mr. A. B.Dunkel, located 
on Columbia St., where a salesroom 18x55 
feet in dimensions is filled to its utmost 
storage capacity with a choice and varied 
assortment of staple and fancy groceries, teas, 
coffees, spices, sugars, syrups, foreign and 
domestic fruits, canned goods, provisions, 
notions, cigars, tobaccos and miscellaneous 
merchandise, such as is usually found in first 
class metropolitan establishments of this class. 
This house was founded about five years ago 
by A. L. Moon, who was succeeded by the 
present owner in January, 1SS4, whose trade 
has largely increased and will now compare 
favorably with that ot any of hi> contempora- 
ries in the same line. Mr. Dunkel is a native 
of Pennsylvania, where he was born March 



UNION CITY. 



171 



ioth, 1S55. Since embarking in business on 
liis own account he has met with a most grati- 
fying degree of success and established a 
reputation for integrity and honorable dealing. 

SHOCKNEY & SHOCKNEY, 

Attorneys, Real Estate and Insur- 
ance Agents. 
While the special branches of business so 
■ably conducted by the representative firm of 
Shockney & Shockney may not perhaps 
appropriately be classed among either the 
industrial or strictly commercial enterprises of 
our prosperous and progressive inland me- 
tropolis, they are so intimately associated and 
practically identified therewith in a great 
variety of ways as to demand conspicuous 
recognition in the present volume, and it is 
■not exceeding the province of our work to 
assert that no firm in the city has exerted a 
greater influence upon the welfare and devel- 
opment of the natural and acquired advantages 
of Union City as a desirable location for the 
■successful prosecution of manufacturing and 
mercantile business than that which forms the 
subject of the present necessarily brief sketch. 
This is one of the leading law firms of this 
section and to the legal department of their 
extensive business Hon. Theo. Shockney, a 
prominent member of the Randolph County 
bar and a former member of the Indiana State 
Legislature, devotes his personal attention, 
making a prominent specialty of litigared 
cases in the courts of Ohio and Indiana, while 
his brother, J. N. Shockney, also a well known 
member of the bar, exercises a general super- 
vision over the real estate and insurance inter- 
ests represented by the firm. Personally 
cognizant of values and familiar with titles to 
the most desirable property in this section, 
including wild lands, improved farms and city 
lots, this firm possesses exceptionable facilities 
for the advantageous transaction of business 
in the real estate line, and whether in effecting 
sales, making purchases or negotiating loans, 
their interests are made identical with those 
of their clients and patrons. For the year 
ending Aug. 1, 1SS3, this firm disposed of real 
estate in this vicinity to the value of more 
than $50,000, while the valuation of that now 
in their hands will vastly exceed that amount. 
Furnishing to property owners and business 
men immunity from losses by fire, as repre- 
*entatives of some of the most reliable insur- 
ance companies of both the old and new world, 
Messrs. Shockney & Shockney present addi- 
tional claims to conspicuous consideration in 
this connection. Among the prominent com- 
panies in which they are prepared to write 
policies upon the most favorable terms may 
be specially mentioned the Lancashire Insur- 
ance Company, of England, with assets of 
.$13,000,000; the Queen Insurance Company, 
of Liverpool, England, assets $1,752,000; the 
California InsuranceCompany, assets $920,000; 
Indiana Insurance Company, assets $210,000; 
the Louisville (Ky.j Underwriters, assets $735,- 
000, aud the well" known Travelers' Accident 



Company ,]of Hartford, Conn. The reputation 
of these companies for the prompt and equita- 
ble adjustment of losses without annoying 
litigation is too well known to require com- 
ment or eulogy at our hands and the large 
number of risks annually taken bv this tirm 
in the different companies mentioned is a suf- 
ficient guarantee of the estimation in which 
they are held in this community. Special 
attention is also paid by this firm to collec- 
tions on all points and their correspondents in 
the various sections oi the Union enable them 
to transact legal business of all kinds in the 
most prompt and satisfactory manner. 

J. S. STARBUCK, 

Wood and Coal; Office, Oak St. 
Mr. Starbuck, who is prominently noticed 
in other great enterprises, first commenced 
the coal business in this city in 1S71 and was 
the first regular coal dealer here. About two 
years ago he added to the handling of coal the 
dealing in both short, split and cord wood, in 
which line of trade he is still engaged, and 
handles about 1,500 tons of coal and about 
700 cords of wood annually. His trade is all 
local. 



A. ADAMS, 

Livery, Feed and Sale Stables, 

Pearl St. 
For more than 20 years the livery, sale and 
feed stables on Pearl St., nc*- conducted and 
recently purchased by Mr. A. Adams, have 
been a familiar landmark in Union City to 
residents and strangers alike having occasion 
to patronize such an establishment, and during 
this period and under all its changes of man- 
agement and proprietorship has maintained an 
untarnished reputation for honorable dealings 
and straightforward transactions. These sta- 
bles were originally established as early as 
1S61 bv Mr. William Branham and since that 
time have been conducted by the following 
named individuals and firms in the order of 
succession named: Espey Bros., Joseph 
Rubey, Branham & Espey, Haines & Negley, 
Negley i: Brumbaugh and Brumbaugh i: 
Adams, which firm was succeeded in April, 
1SS1, bv the present enterprising proprietor. 
The stable buildings are35xiS5 feet in dimen- 
sions and contain ample accommodations for 
50 head of horses at one time. Facilities for 
boarding and caring for horses by the week, 
dav or single meal are unsurpassed, a force of 
competent and experienced hostlers being em- 
ployed. In the sales department horses are 
bought, sold and exchanged or received for 
saleon commission, while in the livery depart- 
ment about 12 fine livery horses are kept for 
hire, with elegant, stylish and comfortable 
carriages, buggies and conveyances of differ- 
ent descriptions. Mr. Adams is a native of 
Pennsylvania but has resided in Indiana since 
1S66. He is a shoemaker by trade and pre- 
vious to engaging in his present business was 
identified with the boot and shoe trade in this 
city and at other points. 



172 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



J. S. REEVES & CO., 

Staple and Fancy Groceries, No. 64 
Oak St. 

Eligibly located at No. 64 Oak St., where 
rents and" expenses are less than on the main 
business thoroughfare, vet in convenient prox- 
imity to a fine class of private residences, is 
the "popular family grocery of Messrs. J. S. 
Reeves & Co., which was established about 
five years ago and passed into the possession 
of its present proprietors in 1SS2. Here a 
salesroom 20x50 feet in dimensions, with 
basement of corresponding size, are required 
for the storage and display of an admirably 
selected stock of stap'e and fancy groceries, 
provisions, farm and dairy produce, manufac- 
tured tobacco and cigars, notions and grocers' 
sundries generally. The trade of this repre- 
sentative house is principally of a local char- 
acter and its annual transactions range from 
$13,000 to $15,000. Mr. J. S. Reeves is a 
native of Indiana and an old resident here, 
being well and favorably known. 

castle & Mcdonald, 

Meat Market, No. 3S Columbia St. 
^The meat markets of a city furnish no 
uncertain index to the character of its inhabi- 
tants. A community where the markets are 
well supplied with choice varieties of meat 
and their appointments present a neat, clean 
and tasteful appearance, the chances are 99 
times in a hundred that the people are indus- 
trious, thrifty and intelligent, well-to-do in 
■worldly affairs and enjoying a high degree of 
civilization, culture and refinement. This 
proposition will be found to apply with peculiar 
propriety to Union Ci'.y and the representa 
tive market conducted bv the enterprising firm 
of Castle & McDonald,' at No. 3S Columbia 
St. may be cited as proof thereof. Established 
more than a decade ago, this popular market 
came into the possession of the present pro- 
prietors in 1S77, at which time they succeeded 
Mr. Heintzleman. The main salesroom, 
■which is 20xSo feet in dimensions, is fitted up 
in modern metropolian style, with all the con- 
veniences and accessories requisite for conduct- 
ing an extensive business, with marble coun- 
ters, ice chests, refrigerators, meat safes, etc., 
and the stock embraces every variety of fresh 
and salt meats, game, poultry and fish in 
season, ham, shoulders," sides, bologna and 
sausages, etc. The firm slaughters its own 
meat and uses annually not less than 300 fine 
fat beeves, 200 hogs, "150 calves and a large 
number of sheep and lambs. They are pre- 
pared at all times to purchase for cash at the 
highest ruling rates all kinds of stock, and 
parties having first class animals to dispose of 
will find an advantageous market here. The 
individual members of the firm, Messrs. R. B. 
Castle and D. L. McDonald, are old residents 
of Indiana and practically conversant with all 
the details of the business in which they are 
engaged and their establishment is justly re- 
garded as one of the leading markets in this 
thriving and progressive city. 



J. W. SHUGARS & BRO., 

Stoves, Tinware, Pumps, etc, Colum- 
bia St. 

The "Blue Front" of Messrs. J. W. Shugars- 
& Bro., on Columbia St., has already become 
one of the familiar landmarks of Union City 
and a point of interest to heads of families and 
frugal housekeepers, for whom the articles 
manufactured and handled by this firm possess 
more than ordinary interest as indispensable 
adjuncts and accessories in every well regu- 
lated household. This popular house was 
established in 18S1 and occupies for sales and 
manufacturing purposes at the above desig- 
nated location one floor 16x75 feet in dimen- 
sions, where may be found at all times a 
desirable line of the best makes of cooking and 
heating stoves, ranges, grates and hollow 
ware, tin, copper and sheet iron ware of their 
own manufacture, the most popular and ser- 
viceable pumps and house furnishing goods 
and kitchen utensils in great variety. In the 
manufacturing department skilled and experi- 
enced workmen are employed in the produc- 
tion of every variety of tin, copper and sheet 
iron ware, and special attention is devoted to 
roofing, spouttng and guttering by competent 
artizans at short notice and at the lowest rates. 
The individual members of the firm, Messrs. 
J. W. and R. H. Shugars, are natives of Penn- 
sylvania and both are practical and expert 
workers in metal. The former has been a 
resident of Indiana for 13 years and the latter 
since 1SS1, at which time their present suc- 
cessful business enterprise was inaugurated. 



CINCINNATI CHEAP STORE, 
S. Davis, Proprietor. 
A "new departure" in the dry goods and 
notion trade was inaugurated in this city in 
May. 1SS3, when Mr. S. Davis, who had pre- 
viously been engaged in the same line at 
Brook'ville, -Ind., for five years, opened on 
Columbia St. the establishment which under 
the designating title of the "Cincinnati Cheap 
Store" has become widely known, on account 
of the variety of stock carried and the uni- 
formly low rates at which the articles of mer- 
chandise are offered, upon the shelves and 
counters of which may be found an almost 
unlimited profusion, elegant and desirable 
styles of foreign and American dry goods, 
notions, ladies' and gentlemen's underwear 
and miscellaneous merchandise for a great 
variety of purposes. Every article is marked 
in plain figures, from which there will be no 
deviation, and the proprietor guarantees that 
in most instances these prices are 25 per cent, 
lower than is asked for the same or similar 
articles at other establishments. Three assist- 
ants are employed in the sales deparlmentand 
visitors, whether they desire to purchase or 
not, will be treated with the utmost courtesy 
and consideration. Mr. Davis, who is a native- 
of Russia, was born in 1S50 and has resided in 
Indiana for the past 14 years, during the 
greater portion of which time he has been, 
engaged in mercantile pursuits. 



UNION CITY. 



17:5 



UNION CITY HEAT FENDER MANU- 
FACTURING COMPANY, 
Manufacturers of Hite'sCook Stove 
Heat Fenders. 
Among the recent discoveries and inven- 
tions, none are more important or promotive 
of the comfort conveniences and happiness of 
both men and women than that known as 
"Hite's Patent Portable Cook Stove Fender 
Fruit and Clothes Dryer," patented August 
13th, 1878, and manufactured by the Union 
City Heat Fender Manufacturing Company, 
a device for preventing the kitchen from be- 
coming overheated bv the cook stove and 
carrying off the odors'arising from cooking 




^r 




H . 



food. This device also affords a convenient 
deposit for cooking utensils when not in use 
and is supplied with shelves for keeping the 
cooked food warm until wanted for use and 
with trays for drying fruits and vegetables and 
bars for drying clothes. This fender is made 
to fit any height of ceiling and can be readily 
moved from one house to another. It is con- 
structed upon purely scientific and philosophi- 
cal principles and by its use numerous 
important advantages are obtained, notably 
more thorough ventilation of the room, better 
draught to the stove and a saving of at least 
one-third the fuel, while if is highly orna- 
mental as well as useful, concealing the cook- 
ing utenJils and presenting the appearance of 
a handsome piece a cabinet work. By its use 
also the kitchen can be used in summer as 
well as winter for a dining room, no heat from 
the stove being perceptible, thus saving the 
use of one room and many steps and much 
labor on the part of the woman of the house in 



preparing the daily meal. Lastly, but not 
least, it saves health, and thereby saves doc- 
tors' bills. Almost every womnn has experi- 
enced the fact that, becoming overheated by 
cooking, canning, preserving and ironing in 
warm weather is the source of headaches, 
weakness, dizziness, eruptions and frequently 
of serious sickness. And our be~t physicians. 
tell us that hundreds of women become pre- 
maturely old and diseased and manv die- 
annually from the effects of overheated kitch- 
ens. By the use of Hite's Heat Fender this- 
may all be avoided. The Union City Heat 
Fender Manufacturing Company, controlling 
the sale and manufacture of the'se specialties 
was founded in 1S7S and in- 
-^ St-'^eL . =■ ^ corporated under the laws of 
'--- -^=rr^r-^.£ ■- the state of Indiana, August 
858^=^r^2 2I < 'SS2, w ' m an authorized 
_ ■ m capital stock of $50,000, now 
wjjjym all paid in, and the merit pre- 
-p' / sented by this dev ce and this 
• .'— v /t-, important industry have been' 
li attested by the large and in- 
JJ creasing sales. Thiscompany 
H which controls one of the im- 
; .j portant industrial enterprises 
I of our thriving city, occupies 
I a ground space of about three 
i; acres, upon which is erected a 
main building for manufac- 
J. turing purposes two stories in 
j:||'ij height and 32x120 feet in di- 
I II mensions, with several sheds 
' ; ' and other building* for the 
9 s orage of finished product* 
j; and raw material. The factory 
I is equ'pp. d with special ma- 
|. chinery and appliances, pro- 
| pel led "by one 40 horsepower 
I engine and boiler, and when 
running full force employs 
I I from 25 to 30 experienced 
r;j|;ji workmen in the different de- 
ll partments. The officers of the 
' '■ '' company as now organized 
Starbuck, President, and J. M- 
Butcher, Secretary, gentlemen of enterprise, 
executive ability and energy. Illustrated cir- 
culars giving full particulars, with endorse- 
ments from some of our most prominent 
citizens, will be cheerfully mailed to any 
address upon application and parties out of 
employment or those desirous of adding to 
their income by introducing a thoroughly re- 
liable and valuable invention will do well to 
correspond with the officers of the company 
as above, relative to terms, inducements and 
arrangements made with agents. With all the 
necessary appliances of labor saving ma- 
chinery, this company have added to their 
operations the manufacture of common and 
extension tables, common bedsteads, cup- 
boards and sales, satisfied that their facilities 
for securing their supplies and their advanta- 
ges for turning out these articles will enable 
them to compete with any other establishment 
in finish, beauty, solidity and price. 



I 



I. S. 



174 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



GEORGE GRAHS & SON, 

Merchant Tailor, Columbia St. 
In according to the enterprising firm of 
George Grahs A: Son the rank to which they 
are so justly entitled, it is but proper to state 
that they possess irf an eminent degree all the 
qualifications and unsurpassed facilities for 
the production of gentlemen's suits and gar- 
ments of the most stylish cut, fashionable 
materials and unrivalled workmanship. This 
representative house was established in 1S7S 
and occupies for its sales department a room 
25x50 feet in dimensions, where may be fovnd 
at all times a desirable and seasonable stock of 
foreign and American piece goods, comprising 
the choicest fabrics for gentlemen's wear and 
a general line of fine furnishing goods and 
underwear of the latest styles. All the novel- 
ties are received direct from New York and 
Philadelphia simultaneously with their appear- 
ance in those cities and the latest Parisian and 
metropolitan fashion plates as soon as issued. 
The cutting department is presided over by 
John G. Grahs, who is an accomplished and 
experienced artist and perfect fits are guaran- 
teed under all circumstances, while in the 
workrooms from ten to twelve assistants of 
acknowledged ability are employed. The 
average valuation of stock carried is about 
$5,000 and the annual transactions range from 
$12,000 to $iS,ooo. Mr. George Grahs, a 
native of Germany, came to the United States 
in 1S51, first locating in Cincinnati. He has 
been a resident of Union City for more than a 
quarter of a centry and is thoroughly conver- 
sant with all the details of the bu-iness. His 
son and partner, Mr. John G. Grahs, was 
born in Union City and upon him devolves 
the general management of the business. He 
is a young man possessing business ability of 
a high order, thorough comprehension of the 
requirements of the trade, artistic taste in the 
selection of stock and keen discrimination in 
adapting his garments and suits to the peculi- 
.arities of his patrons. 



W. M. MEARICK, 
Furniture. 

Possessing a practical and comprehensive 
knowledge of all departments of the furniture 
"business, from the time when the raw material 
reaches the workman's hand until it emerges 
from the factory in all its perfection of utility, 
beauty of design and ornamentation, Mr. VV. 
M. Mearick commenced business on his own 
^account in this city as a manufacturer in 1S6S 
on a very small scale, doing at first all work 
by hand. From this modest beginning he has 
by industry, energy and perseverance estab- I 
lished a thriving business, entitling his house 
to a prominent rank among the industrial 
enterprises of Union City. Mr. Mearick 
now occupies for manufacturing purposes a 
two story building 40x40 feet in dimensions, 
equipped with special machinery for the differ- 
ent departments of his business, propelled by 
steam power, and manufactures furniture of 
all descriptions, with the exception of uphol- 



stered goods, making a leading specialty of 
bedsteads and tables, which are shipped by 
him to dealers in all directions. He also 
transacts a large local retail trade and his 
annual business will compare favorably with 
that of any similar house in this section. Mr. 
Mearick, "who is a native of Pennsylvania, 
was born January 10th, 1S26, and has been a 
resident of Indiana since 1S62. During the 
war of the rebellion he served as musician in 
the iSjth Ohio Volunteer Infantry under Colo- 
nel Dawson and was honorably discharged at 
the expiration of his term of service. 

J. H. SNOOK, 

Tile Factory, on the Ohio Side of 

the State Line. 
In a descriptive review of the various suc- 
cessful industries of Union City, the manufac- 
ture of drain tiles as now conducted by Mr. J. 
H. Snook demands conspicuous recognition. 
This enterprise was inaugurated in this city 
in 1872 and since 1S77 has been under the 
control and management of the present enter- 
prising proprietor, who at that time succeeded 
Mr. George W. Dutro. The works were 
destroyed by fire September 5th, 1S82, entail- 
ing a loss of $S,5CO, but with characteristic 
energy the work of reconstruction was at once 
commenced and new buildings erected upon 
a more extensive scale and with increased 
capacity. Mr. Snook owns and occupies 11 
acres, upon which is erected a large factory 
building 30x80 feet, with engine and boiler 
house 30x40, constructed of solid brick well 
equipped with improved wood working ma- 
chinery. The motive power here is supplied 
by a 60 horse power engine. In this depart- 
ment more than $7,000 has been invested. 
The factory building devoted to the manu- 
facture of tile is a substantial brick 30x150 
feet, to which two kilns are attached and other 
structures of lesser note. The machinery and 
facilities here employed are the most ample 
and complete of their kind in this country. 
The heating or drying apparatus is worthy of 
special mention (.being specially devised by 
Mr. Snook) in its adaptation to requirements 
of his large factory building, enabling him 
to raise the temperature as desired in the large 
number of drying rooms, and so admirably 
arranged is this improved method of trans- 
ferring heat that all par's of the building are 
accessible to the warm temperature without 
loss. The tile mill and crusher are of im- 
proved designs and the works at the present 
time have a capacity for producing annually 
about $30,000 worth of a superior grade of 
drain tile, which finds a ready market in this 
vicinity and within a circuit of 20 miles. The 
establishment has also complete facilities for 
the manufacture of brick. An average force 
of 14 workmen is employed and the products 
of these works have gained an enviable repu- 
tation for qualitv, durability and excellent 
workmanship. Sir. J. H. Sr.ook is a native of 
Maryland, born in *iS:9, but has resided in 
Union City on the Ohio side of the state line 



UNION CITY. 



175 



for the past nine years. He is thoroughly 
conversant with the business in which he is 
engaged and bv his enterprise, energy and 
■"push" has contributed in no small degree to 
the advancement and development of the com- 
mercial and industrial interests of our thriving 
-and progressive community. 

5. L. CARTER, 

Manufacturer of Lumber, Trunk 
Slats and Screws. 

Prominent among the industrial enterprises 
•which have contributed to the material pros- 
perity and thrift ot our progressive community 
and aided in disseminating throughout remote 
sections of the Union the fame of Union City 
as a producing center for a great variety of 
articles intimately associated with the magnifi- 
cent lumber resources of this section, may be 
especially noticed the manufacture of trunk 
•slats as conducted by Mr. S. L. Carter, in con- 
nection with his other branches of industrial 
and commercial avocations. This establish- 
ment as now conducted with its various 
important department* is the outgrowth of an 
enterprise which had its inception here about 
17 years ago under the management of the 
"VVitham Bros. (Thomas and Warren), who 
were subsequently succeeded by Carter Sz 
Fisher, the present proprietor assuming the 
entire management and control of the business 
in 1871. The buildings occupied for manufac- 
turing purposes contain an aggregate of about 
6,000 square feet of floor space, equipped with 
special designs of wood working machinery, 
propelled by one 60 horse power engine and 
boiler, and an average force of 20 skilled work- 
men is regularly employed. Ample adjacent 
•space is utilized for the storage of lumber, 
logs, material and stock and about 300,000 
feet of lumber is used annually in the manu- 
facture of trunk slats alone, of which more 
than 3,000,000 are turned out erery year and 
shipped to trunk manufacturers in different 
sections of the Union. This is the only estab- 
lishment of its class in the state and one of the 
largest, if not the largest, in the Union, and 
-since its inception the business has increased 
more than 300 per cent. In addition to the 
•special industry above mentioned, Mr. Carter 
manufactures large numbers of wood hand- 
screw clamps, for carpenters' and cabinet 
makers' use, and also has fine facilities for 
sawing lumber from the log, of any desired 
dimensions and length up to ^6 feet. The 
mill department, as well as those devoted to 
manufacturing purposes, is equipped thor- 
oughly and an extensive business is transacted 
in this line. Mr. Carter, who is a native of 
New Jersey, has been a resident of Indiana 
for the past ^ years. The business 
■conducted so successfully by him for the past 
12 years owes its almost phenomenal growth 
and development to his practical business 
abilitv, enterprise and "push, "and from a com- 
paratively insignificant beginning has become 
one of Union City's most important industries. 



WILLIAM T. WORTHINGTON, 

Sewino Machines, Buggies, etc, N. 
W. Cor. Oak and Columbia Sts. 
We invite the attention of our readers to 
the establishment of Mr. W. T. Worthington, 
dealer in sewing machines, buggies, carriages, 
etc., located at trie northwest corner of Oak 
and Columbia Sts. Mr. Worthington handles 
15 of the principal varieties of sewing ma- 
chines, such as the Light Running Domestic, 
the New Home, the World's Leader, the 
Royal St. John, the New Hartford, the Rem- 
ington, White, Singer and other standard and 
j cheap styles and carries full lines of -easing 
I machine supplies of every description, selling 
I for cash or on weekly or monthly payments as 
■ desired. He also represents as exclusive 
agent in this section the celebrated Haydock 
t buggies, of Cincinnati, the Columbus bug- 
' gies, of Columbus, O., and the Woodhull 
buggies, of Dayton, O ., the relative merits of 
! which are too well known to require comment 
at our hands. Mr. Worthington not only sup- 
1 plies his patrons and customers from his 
j warerooms and repositories in this city, but 
employs from eight to ten agents and travel- 
ing salesmen in different sections of Indiana 
and Ohio representing his interests and intro- 
! ducing the various articles comprising his 
stock in trade. This is the most extensive 
establishment in the city and one of the most 
important in this portion ot the state engaged 
in this special department. 



JOHN KOONTZ. 

Furniture Nj. 34 Columbia St. 
A history of the growth, development and 
progress of the old established and well known 
furniture house of Mr. John Koontz forms 
part and parcel of the hitherto unwritten his- 
tory of Union City's enterprise and commer- 
cial thrift. Founded while yet our prosperous 
inland metropolis was in its infancy, as early 
as in 1S56, upon a scale corresponding with 
the requirements of a frontier settlement, all 
work being done exclusively by hand, this 
representative establishment has grown with 
the city's growth and prospered with its pros- 
perity 'until it is to-day- not only the oldest 
but the most extensive and important industry 
of its kind in Randolph County or in this sec- 
tion of the state. Mr. Koontz now occupies 
for sales purpo-es, at No. 34 Columbia St., 
three entire floors of the spacious and commo- 
dious warehouse ^oxiS> feet in dimensions, 
where is displaved a fine and comprehensive 
assortment of all varieties of furniture, from 
the most elegant and costly parlor suites to 
the ordinary and common varieties, all of 
which with the exception of upholstered arti- 
cles and chairs are the products of his own 
factory, which is located in a two story brick 
building 35XS4 feet in dimensions, on the state 
line, south" of the railroad. These work^ are 
thoroughly equipped with the latest and most 
approved designs of wood working machinery, 
propelled by "steam power, and an average 
force of nine skilled and experienced workmen 



'- 



176 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



is employed in the manufacturing depart- 
ment. The trade of this house is largely local 
and derived from adjacent counties within a 
radius of 150 miles. Mr. Koontz, who is a 
native of Germany, was born in 1S29. He has 
resided in this state since 1S52 and for more 
than a quarter of a century been prominently 
identified with the interests of Union City. 
He has been four times elected by his fellow 
citizens to the City Council, of vhich body he 
has always been regarded as a progressive and 
influential member. He was a prominent 
member of the Council which laid out and 
platted the present city streets and boundaries 
in 1852 and is at this time a Commissioner of 
the city. 

W. G. KELLER, 

Blacksmith and Dealer ln Wagons, 

No. 98 West Oak St. 
Dating back to Tubal Cain, this calling 
bears an antiquity not surpassed bv any other. 
Mr. Keller, the proprietor of the" blacksmith 
shop at No. 9S West Oak St., started in busi- 
ness in this city about i6years ago at the same 
location he now occupies. He carries on 
every description of work, belonging to this 
department of business, ironing wagons, car- 
riages ar.d buggies, horse shoeing and general 
job work, guaranteeing first class wcrk at all 
times. He also keeps on hand ready made 
farm and spring wagons, which he guarantees 
to sell as low as any, where true value is taken 
into account. He is also prepared to do paint- 
ing and general repairing promp'ly to order. 
Mr. Keller is a native of Wurtemburg, Ger- 
many, where he was born in 1S42. He came 
to this country in 1S64, landing at New York 
and coming direct to this city. He learned his 
trade in the old country and has now had an 
experience in the business of over 2S years. 

JOHN D. SMITH, 

Jewelry, Musical Merchandise, etc 
The great variety and diversity of useful 
and ornamental articles displayed on the 
shelves and counters of Mr. John D. Smith's 
popular establishment, on Columbia St., ren- 
ders this one of the most attractive mercantile 
houses on that busy thoroughfare. Mr. Smith 
occupies a spacious and handsomely furnished 
salesroom 22xSo feet in dimensions, carrying 
a complete and elegant assortment of Ameri- 
can and Swiss watches, clocks, jewelry, solid 
silver and plated ware, musical instruments 
and musical merchandi-e in great variety, 
toys, notions and miscellaneous merchandise 
in such endless varieties as to defy enumera- 
tion or description in the limited space allotted 
in the present volume. This representative 
house was established upon a comparatively 
small scale in July, 1S65, by its piesent pro- 
prietor, and each succeeding season has wit- 
nessed a gratifying increase oi trade. The 
first year's transactions did not exceed $1,000, 
while at the present time the yearly sales will 
closely approximate $12,000. "Mr. Smith, who 
is a native of Randolph County, was born in 



1839 and is a practical watchmaker and jew- 
eler. He makes a prominent specialty of fine- 
watch repairing in all branches. His stock is- 
carefully and judiciously selected and his 
prices will be found to be uniform lv the lowest 
consistent with good goods and honorab'e- 
dealing. An inspection of his merchandise 
and an examination ot quality and prices will 
convince the most skeptical that this is par 
excellence the place to purchase articles pertain- 
ing to this special branch of business. 



A. A. HUTCHINSON, 

Family Groceries, No. 52 Pearl St. 
Among the representative h*>u*es in this 
line which have attained a more than ordi- 
nary degree of popularity among all classes is 
that now conducted by Mr. A. A.. Hutchinson,, 
located on Pearl St., which w;is originally 
established in iS7> by the firm of Hutchinson 
& Co., and two years later came into the ex- 
clusive possession of the present proprietor, 
whose transactions since that time have beer* 
characterized by a regular annual increase, 
until they now range from $15,000 to $2o,coo 
per year. Mr. Hutchinson occupies a spacious 
and conveniently arranged salesroom 23x70 
feet in dimensions, carrying a general line of 
staple and fancy groceries, provi-ions, table 
culinary supplies, notions, cigairs, manufac- 
tured tobaccos and miscellaneous merchan- 
dise pertaining to this special branch of trade,, 
the average valuation of which will not fall 
short of $3,000. He employs two assistants 
and one wagon for delivery purposes, making 
a specialty of the prompt and expeJitiousv 
delivery of purchases and orders in any sec- 
tion of the city. Mr. Hutchinson is a native- 
of Saratoga County, N. Y., but came to Union 
County, 0., when but eight years of age, re- 
moving to Union City in 1875, -where he has 
since been prominently identified with the 
grocery business, in which he occupies at the 
present time a leading position among his con- 
temporaries. 



SAMUEL T. VORE & CO., 

Clothing, Boots and Shoes. 
This popular clothing emporium and boot 
and shoe house now conducted by the enter- 
prising firm of Samuel T. Vore and Co. was 
established in 1SS0 by Mr. A. PyLe and passed 
into the possession of the present proprietors 
in 1SS2, since which time a marked increase 
in the annual transactions has been the result 
of the unremitting vigilence and energetic 
management of the members of the firm, who 
are determined to merit the confidence and 
patronage of a discriminating public by keep- 
ing at all times the best and most reliable arti- 
cles of merchandise in their line and offering 
them at such prices as to defy successful com- 
petition. The clothing and furna-ihing goods 
department is stocked with a carefully selected 
assortment of men's and boys' garments and 
suits of superior workmanship, reliable mate- 
rial and stylish cut, from the most famous 
clothing manufacturers of the East, and a fine 



P 



UNION CITY. 



177 



line ot fashionable underwear of all kinds, 
-especially adapted to the requirements of the 
trade in this section. The boot and shoe 
department is also replete with the finest pro- 
ducts of the leading factories of the Union, 
including both fine and common varieties of 
boots, shoes, slippers and rubbers for ladies', 
gentlemen's, girls' and boys' wear, and special 
inducements are offered to patrons in this 
•department. A prominent specialty of this 
house is the genuine standard -crew fastened 
boots and shoes, which are acknowledged to 
be the most durable and serviceable of any 
now before the American people. Mr. Samuel 
T. Vore is a native of Wayne County, Ind , 
but has resided in Union City since the spring 
•of 1SS1. He was formerly engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits. His partner and business 
associate, Mr. Frank Moore, is a native of 
Ohio and has been a resident of this county 
ior the past iS years. 

BRANHAM'S HOTEL AND RESTAU- 
RANT. 
William Branham, Proprietor. 
Conducted upon both the European and 
American plans, Branham's Hotel and Restau- 
rant offers to the traveling public extraordi- 
nary inducements in the way of first class 
accommodations for guests, as well as in its 
convenient proximity to the depot and its 
arrangements for the entertainment of travel- 
ers upon the arrival of trains. This popular 
botel was established in 1S75 on its present 
*ite in an unpretentious wooden structure, 
■which was swept away in the disastrous con- 
flagration of May 4th, iSS3, which destroyed 
more than $300,000 worth of valuable property 
in the business center of the city. In 90 days 
from the date of its destruction the ruins had 
been cleared away and an elegant three story 
brick structure had risen, Phcenix like, from 
the ashes of the unsightly frame building 
which, notwithstanding its inadequacy to 
modern requirements, had for many years 
■enjoyed an enviable reputation for the first 
class accommodations it had afforded. The 
new building, covering a ground space of 
41x71 feet, is admirably arranged throughout 
for the special purposes for which it was 
designed and finished and furnished in the 
most approved modern metropolitan style. 
The restaurant or lunch room will in in all its 
appointments, decorations and fixtures com- 
pare favorably with any similar establishment 
in the seaboard, lakeside or inland cities oi the 
Union and the dining room is all that modern 
taste can devise or the most fastidious epicure 
desire. The tables are supplied with the 
choicest viands, served in unexceptionable 
style. Hot coffee, tea and lunCh are served in 
the cafe at all hours and on the arrival of all 
trains regular meals at the table-de-hole, ox a la 
carte. The upper stories of the hotel are ele- 
gantly furnished for sleeping apartments and 
are almost constantly filled with occupants, 
comprising railroad officials and the better class 
of the traveling public. The accommodations 



in the guests' chambers being necessarilv lim- 
ited and the reputation of the hou-e so well 
known, no patronage is so! : ci'ed by runners, 
agents or advertisements, yet the rooms are 
continually filled and scarcely a day passes 
that applications for rooms are not reluctantly 
rejected. Mr. William Branham is a native 
and lifelong resident of Indiana and was born 
in Jennings County in 1S37. He has enjoved 
an extended experience in the hotel bu-iness 
and as a caterer and host has won for himself 
golden opinions from all who have had the 
good fortune to partake of his liberal ho-pi- 
talitv. 



HENRY FEY, 

Meat Market, East Pearl St. 
At the old established market of Mr. Hcnrv 
Fey, on East Pearl St., may always be pro- 
cured the choicest cuts of fresh beef, pork, 
lamb, veal, mutton, etc., game and poultry in 
season, salt and cured meat-, sau-age, bolognas, 
etc., at the lowest rates consistent with full 
weight, good meats and honorable dealing. 
This well known and thoroughly reliable 
market was founded more than 15 years ago 
by its present proprietor and is "one of the 
familiar places for home supplies in this line 
in Union City. The salesroom, which is 
25x40 feet in dimensions, is equipped with all 
the improved modern appliances and conveni- 
ences, including a fine cooling room. etc. Mr. 
Fey selects the finest stock and slaughters^his 
own cattle, using on an average seven beeves, 
four calves, four sheep and four hogs per 
week, and numbers among his regular patrons 
many of the first families in this city and 
vicinity. Mr. Fey is a native of Germany and 
was born in Hesse Nassau, coming to this 
country in 1S59. He first located at Cincin- 
nati, but came to this city in 1S65, where 
he has since been engaged in his present line 
of business. 



PLATT & BOLEN, 

Groceries, Provisions, etc., Pearl St. 
Among the most prominent grocerv hou-es 
of our thriving and progressive municipality, 
none are entitled to more favorable considera- 
tion than that which was established by Mr. 
G. Fowler in 1S75 anc ' since March, 1SS3, con- 
ducted by the enterprising firm of Piatt & 
Bolen. Eligibly and centrally located on 
Pearl St., the salesroom of this "firm is 23x70 
feet in dimensions and stocked with a fresh 
and desirable assortment of the choicest grades 
of staple and fancy family groceries and pro- 
visions, canned fruits, vegetables, meats, etc., 
choice tobacco and cigars and a general line of 
table and culinary supplies and grocer-' sun- 
dries, selected with an express view to the 
requirements of the better class of trade. Mr. 
J. C. Piatt, a native of Cincinnati, O., has been 
a resident of Union City since 1S67 aid has been 
prominently identified with numerous mer- 
cantile and industrial enterprises, having been 
previous to the formation of the present part- 
nership engaged in the grocery trade, tbe 



178 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



book business and lumber interests. During 
the war of the rebellion he honorably served 
a term of three years in the 12th Ohio In- 
fantry, participating in the memorable engage- 
ment's of Second Bull Run, South Mountain, 
Antietam and other important and decisive 
battles of the war. Mr. John YV. Bclen was 
admitted to partnership in September, 1SS3. 
He is a native of Ohio and wa< formerly 
engaged quite extensively in the manufacture 
of brick. During the war of the rebellion he 
was a soldier in the 7th Indiana Cavalry, ist 
Brigade, 16th Army Corps, 2d Division. He 
participated in numerous hotly contested en- 
gagements of that gallant army. Both mem- 
bers of the firm are well and favorably known 
in this community as reliable and energetic 
business men. 

THE STAR LIVERY/FEED AND 
SALE STABLES, 
Charlks H. Cadwalladf.r, Prop., Nos. 
54, 56 and 5S Columbia St. 

Contributing largely in its way to the con- 
venience and necessities of the community, 
our well equipped and conducted livery, feed 
and sale stables, in their associated interests, 
attract wide attention both at home and 
abroad, embracing not only relatives but the 
traveling public generally. The Star stable, 
of Union City, Ind., occupies a leading posi- 
tion among the largest and best equipped and 
conducted livery, feed and sale stables in the 
state, if indeed they are equalled even in our 
metropolitan cities, and are justly entitled to 
liberal notice in a historical review of the 
commercial and industrial operations of this 
county and state. Mr. Charles H. Cadwalla- 
der, the proprietor of these stables, is a native 
of this state and county, where he was born in 
1861. After completing his literary education 
he became associated with the commercial and 
financial operations of this section and in 1SS3 
was chosen to the responsible position of 
Cashier of the Citizens' Bank, of this city, a 
position he still holds. In 1SS3 he purchased 
of Messrs. Alexander & Co. the stock and 
good will of the Star Livery Stables, of this 
citv, which he conducted under competent 
and experienced superintendent and assistants 
up to February 1st, 1SS4, at which time he 
purchased of Mr. Coppy C- Smith the stock, 
equipments and franchise of the "Empire" 
Livery Stables, adjoining, both of which are 
now under his control and management and 
will hereafter be conducted under the name of 
"The Star Stables." The premises associated 
with these stables embrace a space of about 
60x190 feet in dimensions and have a capacity 
for about 100 hor-es, besides carriage rooms, 
offices, etc. The general office of these stables 
is a model of neatness and elegance in its fur- 
nishings and equipments; in fact, is the finest 
livery office in the state and will bear favora- 
ble comparison with the finest offices in our 
metropolitan cities. Besides an ample supply 
of fine carriages and buggies, these stables 
will always be supplied with fine driving and 



I riding horses and elegant equipments for the 
: pleasure and convenience of citizens and the 
[ traveling public. Coaches and carriages will 
, be supplied with trusty drivers for weddings, 
! parties, festivals or "funeral occasions and' 
I traveling men conveyed to different points or* 
reasonable terms. Horses will be purchased, 
sold or boarded by the feed, day or week. A 
competent force of assistants are constantly 
employed to secure every attention to patrons 
in every department of business, and the effi- 
ciency of these stables insure to them the tore- 
most position among their class in any section 
of the Union. 



R. J. CLARK, 

Restaurant, Bakery and Confec- 
tionery, No. 33 Columbia St. 

The establishment of Mr. R. J. Clark, 
I located at No. 33 Columbia St., is now in the 
: 17th year of a prosperous existence. The 
premises occupied at the above named loca- 
, tion are 23x80 feet in dimensions and the 
J business is sub-divided into three distinct 
I departments. The restaurant is hand~omeIv 
and tastefully furnished and regular meals o'r 
lunches are served to patrons in the most 
attractive and appetizing forms during regular 
business hours and at the most reasonable 
rates. Oysters and ice cream in season are 
specialties for which this establishment is 
| widely noted, while one of Puffer's frigid soda 
I fountains supplies this delicious beverage dur- 
ing the warm months. In the sales depart- 
I ment both a wholesale and retail business is 
transacted and the stock embraces an admira- 
bly selected assortment of foreign and domes- 
tic fruits and nuts, fine confectioneries and the 
choicest varieties of fresh bread, rolls, cakes, 
crackers, pies, etc., of his own manufacture 
and miscellaneous merchandise pertaining to 
this branch of , trade. The manufacturing 
department or bakery is located in the base- 
ment, where a room 23x40 feet in size is 
equipped with all the requisite appliances for 
the production of the articles above enumer- 
ated, with ovens of improved design and con- 
struction. About 15 barrels of flour are used 
each week in this department and the articles 
manufactured here are of a superior quality. 
Special attention is devoted to the ornamenta- 
tion of fancy cakes for weddings, festivals, 
banquets, etc., and the artistic ability displayed 
in this line has given to the establishment a 
widespread reputation throughout this section. 
The bakery, kitchen, restaurant and sales- 
rooms are models of neatness in their way and 
this establishment is recognized as the leading 
one of its kind in this section of the state. 
Mr. R. J. Clark, who is a native of Ireland, 
came to the United States nearly 40 years 
ago, when but a small boy. He is a practical 
and experienced baker and confectioner and 
came West more than a quarter of a century 
ago, locating in Union City in 1S67, at which 
time his present successful business was estab- 
lished. 



UNION CITY. 



179 



BARNES & HOUGH, 

Groceries and Provisions. 
The Grocery and provision trade in Union 
City is worthily and efficiently represented by 
numerous houses, prominent among which 
may be especially mentioned that conducted 
by the enterprising firm of Barnes & Hough, 
at the corner ol Columbia and Pearl Sts. 
This is one of the oldest established and well 
known stands in the city, having been founded 
in 1855 by Mr. Albert Lenox. The present 
proprietors assumed control of the business in 
November, 1SS2, succeeding the firm ol H. T. 
Gist & Co. The salesroom, which is eligibly 
and centrally located in the heart of the bnsi- 
ness portion of the city, is 22x60 feet in dimen- 
sions and is thoroughly and completely 
stocked with a choice assortment of staple and 
fancy groceries and provisions, teas, coffees, 
spices, canned goods and fruit specialties, 
country produce, glass and queens ware, 
choice cigars and manufactured tobaccos, 
notions and miscellaneous merchandise, which 
under the head of grocers' sundries legiti- 
mately pertain to the equipment of a first 
class "metropolitan establishment of this de- 
scription. In all departments of table and 
culinary supplies their goods have been care- 
fully selected with specral reference to quality, 
absolute freshness, purity and freedom from 
adulterations being the desiderata aimed at, 
while their prices are uniformly the lowest 
consistent with good goods, fair weight and 
measure and strictly honorable dealing. The 
individual members of this representative 
firm, Mr. John A. Barnes, a native of Indiana, 
and Mr. Samuel F. Hough, a native of Ohio, 
are gentlemen well and favorably known in 
commercial circles and their establishment is 
deservedly popular with the better class of 
trade. 



DR. J. A. PROCTOR & SON, 

Druggists and Apothecaries. 
The establishment of Dr. J. A. Proctor & 
Son was founded in 1S76 by Proctor & Co., 
which firm was succeeded in January, 1S81, by 
the present proprietors, who occupy for sales- 
room and laboratory one floor and basement, 
each 22x45 *" eel m dimensions, carrying a full 
line of the purest and freshest "drugs and 
chemicals, standard and proprietary medi- 
cines, toilet articles, perfumeries and druggists' 
sundries generally. This firm also make a 
leading specialty of the accurate preparation 
ot physicians' prescriptions, family recipes and 
pharmaceutical compounds and manufacture 
"Dr. Proctor's Ague Specific," "Dr. Proctor's 
Hops and Boneset," for coughs, colds, asthma, 
etc., and "Dr. Proctor's Celebrated Balsam," 
three of the most desirable proprietary medi- 
cines of the day, which have received the 
most flattering endorsements from the medical 
fraternity throughout this section. The indi- 
vidual members of this firm, Dr. J. A. Proctor 
and his son, Mr. Charles A. Proctor, are both 
natives of Ohio but have resided in tin* state 
for the past 15 years. The former is a regu- 



larly educated physician of the eclectic school, 
who, previous to engaging in the present 
business had for many years been a successfi I 
practitioner of medicine and an honored mem- 
ber of the fraternity in high standing. As a 

* cancer specialist, 
Dr. Proctor acknowledges no superior in the 
United States, having never failed to cure a 
cancer, ulcer or tumor where he has promised 
a cure. He removes cancers without the use 
of instruments or causing pain and those who 
may desire to consult him may relv upon his 
guaranteeing just what he p'romfses to per- 
form, and he is responsible for his pledges. 

L. D. LANTER, 

Staple and Fancy Groceries, Coll.m- 

bia St. 
To depict for the benefit of our readers and 
the commendation of the public instances of 
energy, integrity and capacity, exhibited in 
any branch of the diverse interests which 
engage the attention of our representative 
merchants, is a province of this work of which 
we are frequently reminded and which we 
feel at liberty to exercise with reference to the 
popular grocery house 01 Mr. L. D. Lanter, 
located on Columbia St. Since its inception 
it has grown in a manner highly indicative ot 
careful management and experienced pro- 
ficiency. Mr. Lanter is a shrewd, careful and 
judicious buyer and in making his selections 
purchases only articles of undoubted puritv 
and excellence. By a strict adherence to this 
rule he has established a prosperous and grow- 
ing trade among the better classes of the com- 
munity, who prefer fair rates for reliable 
goods. His stock embraces a general line ol 
the better grades ot staple and fancy groceries, 
teas, coffees, spices, sugars, fruits, canned and 
bottled goods, cigars, tobacco--, notions and 
miscellaneous merchandise, included in the 
generic terms of grocers' sundries. The sales- 
room is 22x100 feet in dimensions and one of 
the most attractively arranged establishments 
of its class in this city. His trade, although 
largely local, extends throughout the neigh- 
boring towns and will compare favorably with 
that ot any similar house in the city. Mr. 
Lanter is a native of the state of Arkansas but 
has lived a great portion of his life in this state. 



CHENOWETH & CAMPBELL, 

C. O. D. Meat Market, No. 60 Oak 
St. and South Columbia St. 
One of the oldest and most popular meat 
markets of Union City is centrally and eli^- 
bly located at No. 60 Oak St. and "at the pres- 
ent time conducted by the enterprising firm of 
Chenoweth & Campbell. The premises at 
this location occupied for the sales depart- 
ment were erected many years ago by Mr. 
Charles Heintzelman and succesfullv" con- 
ducted by him as a meat market for several 
vears. Mr. Chenoweth took an interest In the 
business in partnership with Mr. B.F.Julian 
in 1S82. In 1SS3 the present firm was organ- 
ized by the retirement of Mr. Julian, whose 



ISO 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



interest was purchased by Mr. Campbell, and 
the business has under their judicious and 
energetic management assumed even more 
gratifying proportions than under the former 
administration. "Full weights and good 
quality of meats" is the motto adopted and 
conscientiously adhered to by this firm. Their 
stock embraces a general line of choice fresh* 
and salt meats for family use, including fresh 
beef, pork, veal, mutton, dressed poul'ry and 
game in season, sausages, bologna, puddings. 
head cheese, pig's fret, pre-sed corn beef, lard, 
and every variety of cured meats, pickled 
pork, etc. This firm is prepared to purchase 
at all times stock, hides and tallow at the 
highest ruling rates. They slaughter and pre- 
pare their own meats, using annually about 
250 beeves and laige numbers of sheep, hos;s, 
calves, etc. Both members of the lirm are 
natives and lifelong residents of Indiana and 
are both practically conversant with all the 
details of the business in which they are en- 
gaged and with the requirements of "the trade 
in this city. This firm also conduct a finely- 
equipped meat market located south of the 
railroad, on Columbia St., which is kept con- 
stantly supplied wih choicest meats and in 
every particular will be iound as desirable 
family supplies in this line as at the main 
house, on Oak St. 



SWAIN & BIRT, 

Booksellers and Stai ioners, Colum- 
bia St. 
No better evidence of the civilization, cul- 
ture and refinement of a community need be 
adduced than the patronage bestowed upon 
establishments demoted to the sale of standard 
and miscellaneous literature and works of art 
for household decorations. As disseminators 
of u-elul information ar.d popular literature 
and dealers in school and miscellaneous books 
and school thildrens' complete outfit, sta- 
tionery, blank books, wall papers, window- 
blinds, pictures, frames, mirrors, mouldings, 
brackets, etc., the representative firm of Swain 
& B:rt claim prominent recognition among the 
leading mercantile houses of Eastern Indiana. 
Founded more than 15 years ago, this house 
came into 'he possession of its present proprie- 
tors in 1SS2, at which time they succeeded the 
firm of S wain «£ Piatt, who succeeded Gordon 
& Hill. Their salesroom is centrally located 
on Columbia St., opposite the Citizens' Bank, 
and is 18x70 feet in dimensions, embrac- 
ing two floors and basement, and the 
sto-k is at all times comprehensive and 
complete in all of its departments. All 
of the new and desirable books and peri- 
odicals are received direct from the publish- 
ers as soon as issued from the press, or can 
be secured on short notice. This firm procure 
supplies direct from the Lading Eastern liter- 
ary publishers and carry in stock weekly and 
monthly papers and magazines of the principal 
cities of the Union, also the prominent daily- 
papers of Cincinnati and Indianapolis. Mr. 
W. A. Swain is a native ot Ohio and was born 



in 1S22. He has been a resident of Indiana 
since 1S53 and is one of our most highly re- 
spected and public spirited citizens and "is at 
the present time a member of the City Council, 
to which body he had previously been elected 
for three successive terms. Mr. Harry Birt, 
the junior member of the firm, is a native and 
lifelong resident of this state and has been 
for many years identified with the business in 
whicn he is now engaged. 

J. M. SHANK, 

Stoves, Tin, Gi ass and Qi eensware, 

Oak and Columbia Sts. 
The representative establishment of Mr. J. 
M. Shank, dealer in stoves and house furnish- 
ing goods and manufacturers of tin, copper 
and sheet- iron ware, whose warerooms are 
located on the northeast corner of Oak and 
Columbia Sts., where the entire first floor, 
46XS5 feet, with basements 65x20 and 30x16 
feet in dimensions, are occupied for sales and 
manufacturing purposes, the basement being 
used for storage purposes. This old estab- 
lished and well known house was founded by 
its present enterprising proprietor in 1S5S and 
has for more than a quarter of a century main- 
tained a conspicuous rank as the leading 
establishment of its class in this section of the 
state. The stock comprises a general line of 
the best varieties of parlor, cooking and heat- 
ing stoves from the leading manufactories of 
the Union, the largest assortment of queens- 
wan-, glassware, table cutlery, kitchen and 
dining room accessories to be found in the 
city, tin, copper, and sheet-iron ware froni his 
own manufactory, bird cages and miscella- 
neous merchandise pertaiuing to this special 
branch of business. In the manufacturing 
department special attention is devoted to 
iron, tin and metal roofing,, spouting, guttering 
and general jobbing, as well as to the manu- 
facture of all kinds of utensils from tin and 
sheet metals, by skilled anJ experienced work- 
men. Mr. Shank, who is. a native of Mont- 
gomery County, O., was born in 1S31 but has 
been a resident of this city and state since 
1S5S. He has ever taken an active and influ- 
ential interest in public affairs and has served 
for several terms as a member of the City 
Council, to the entire satisfaction of his con- 
stituents, and was also for some time a promi- 
nent member of the Board of Public Works of 
this city. 



DR. D. B. COWDERY, 

Surgeon Dentist, Columbia St., over 

Shaw's Dry Goods Store. 
The art of dentistry seems to have been 
introduced into this country during the Revo- 
luionery War by a French soldier. It was, 
however, in such a crude way as to bear no 
relationship to the art as now- practiced, in 
which it is conceded that American dentists 
stand in advance of all others. Mr. D. B. 
Cowdery began practice in this city in April, 
1S65, when he occupied rooms near his pres- 
ent location. Dr. Cowdery occupies a finely 



UNION CITY. 



181 



furnished suite of rooms In a new brick build- 
ing, on Columbia St., where he gives his 
special attention to every description of opera- 
tive dentistry, guaranteeing satisfaction in all 
•work executed and employing newest efficient 
methods known to the dental art. He gives 
special attention to preserving natural teeth, 
and in extracting is able to do so without giv- 
ing pain to his patients. Dr. Cowdery is a 
native of Meigs County, O., where he was 
born in 1825. Previous to devoting his atten- 
tion to dentistry he was chiefly engaged in 
mercantile pursuits. In 1852, having pre- 
viously devoced his attention to the study of 
dentistry under Prof. Smith, of Cincinnati, O., 
he commenced the practice in his native 
county and has been engaged in the business 
ever since. 



UNION CITY CARRIAGE MANUFAC- 
TURING COMPANY. 

The favorable location of Union City, both in 
reference to a seemingly inexhaustable supply 
of the best material and as a distributing cen- 
ter tor its manufactured products, led to the 
establishment here of that special branch of 
productive industry now so successfully and 
extensively carried on by the Union City 
Carriage Manufacturing Company, whose 
specialties of light carriages, buggies and road 
carts have already gained a national reputation 
and meet with a ready sale in all sections of 
the Union. This important industrial enter- 
prise was inaugurated in September, 1SS1, at 
which time a stock company was organized, 
■with a capital of $30,000, and incorporated 
under the laws of the state of Indiana. The 
works of this company comprise four commo- 
dious two story buildings devoted to manufac- 
turing purposes, each of which is thoroughly 
equipped with all the requisite machinery for 
successfully conducting the extensive busi- 
ness of the company in its various depart- 
ments, motive power being supplied by one 
large engine and boiler. An average force of 
about 35 skilled workmen in the different 
departments are employed and the works at 
the present time have a capacity for turning 
out about 2,500 carts and Soo carriages and 
buggies annually. The specialties for which 
this company have acquired a widespread 
reputation are the celebrated Timken spring 
buggies, three spring English phrctons, piano 
box and drop front buggies, Brewster sidebar 
and Dexter queen buggies and their univer- 
sally popular Gilbert road carts, manufactured 
in a great variety of different styles under 
patents granted by the U. S. Government. By 
the use of the improvements introduced by 
this company under the patents above noticed, 
the great and hitherto objectionable features 
known as the "horse motion" are entirely 
obviated and these carts are now meeting with 
an immense sale in all parts of the country. 
The annual transactions of the company at 
the present time will exceed $100,000 and the 
demand for their products is increasing so 
rapidly that additional facilities have been 



made in buildings, etc., to meet the demands 
upon their resources. The officers of this 
company as at present organized are Charles 
W. Pierce, President; H. D. Grahs, Secretary ; 
Thomas Jones, Treasurer, and C. W. Tritt, 
Superintendent. 



BR AN HAM HOTEL, 

Staats Sc Bran-ham, Proprietors. 
The predominating requisites of a first class 
hotel in any community are, that its location 
be central and convenient, its accommoda- 
tions for guests and patrons be good, and its 
management efficient and solicitious for the 
comfort, welfare and convenience of its 
patrons. These requisites are possessed in an 
eminent degree by the old established and 
well known Branham House, of Union City, 
which has for more than a quarter of a cen- 
tury been justly regarded as the leading hotel 
in this section of the state. From a historical 
standpoint, this popular hotel also has peculiar 
interest to those who have watched and won- 
dered at the phenomenal growth, progress and 
development of our thriving municipality, 
which has within less than a third of a century 
grown from an insignificant frontier settle- 
ment in the forest to be one of the most pro- 
gressive and prosperous inland cities of Eastern 
Indiana. In 1855 Mr. Simeon Branham, 
whose name has become intimately identi- 
fied with the history of Union City, estab- 
lished on a small scale an eating house or 
restaurant, which was at that time amply 
adequate to the wants and requirements of the 
citizens and visitors, the city then only having 
been laid out one year. Growing with the 
growth and prospering with the prosperity of 
Union City, keeping at all times abreast of 
the times and the progressive spirit of modern 
enterprise, the present elegant, commodious and 
conveniently arranged hotel, with its 60 rooms 
and all modern conveniences, is the outgrowth 
of the little country eating house of 1S55, an 
enduring and appropriate monument to the 
enterprise and ability of its honored founder, 
projector and for 27 years its popular proprie- 
tor. The present building, which is three 
stories in height, covers a ground space of 
56x120 feet and is eligibly and centrally located 
in convenient proximity to all the railroad 
stations, in a beautiful cluster of shade trees, 
making it one of the most delightful situations 
for a hotel imaginable. The structure, which 
was erected expressly for hotel purpo^rs, con- 
tains on the first floor a spacious office, gentle- 
men's reading and writing rooms, bar and 
billiard parlor, dining room with a seating 
capacity of 100 at one time, kitchen culinary 
and laundry departments. The water closet 
and other accessories are the most complete 
and perfect to be found in any hotel outside of 
Indianapolis. On the second floor are the 
ladies' parlors and reception rooms and guests' 
chambers, single and en suite, while the entire 
third floor is devoted to sleeping apartments. 
The entire building is supplied with gas of 
their own manufacture, water and all the 



182 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



modern conveniences, while the cuisine and 
table accommodations are all that could be 
desired by the most fastidious epicure. The 
rates have been fixed at the popular price of 
$2.00 per day, and it is safe to assert that the 
Branham will bear favorable comparison with 
any of its contemporaries Easi or West. The 
present proprietors, who assumed the manage- 
ment of the Branham in November 1SS2, are 
Mr. E. H. Branham, a son of the original pro- 
prietor, who was borh in Indiana, and Mr. J. 
W. Staats, also a native- of this state, and son- 
in-law of Mr. Simeon Branham, both of whom 
are competent and experienced hotel men and 
worthy successors of him from whom the 
hotel takes its name. 



WITHAM & ANDERSON COMPANY, 
Lumber and Hardware. 
This important company is the outgrowth 
of an enterprise which was inaugurated in 
1874 as a partnership concern, but which, 
owing to the rapid increase of its business, it 
was deemed expedient in 1SS2 to organize as 
a stock company, which was accordingly done, 
and the Witham & Anderson Company was 
incorporated under the laws of the state of 
Indiana with a capital of $150,000, of which 
about Sioo.oco is paid in and invested in their 
business operations. The individual members 
are Thomas Witham, William II. Anderson, 
R. A. Witham, F. S. Anderson and E. H. 
Bowen. This company handle annually more 
than 6,000,000 feet of lumber and make a great 
specialty of manufacturing every variety of 
dressed and finished stuff for building purposes, 
doors, sash, blinds, frames, moldings, brackets 
and stair work, lath, shingles, etc. They also 
carry in stock a complete and comprehensive 
assortment of builders' hardware, nails, locks, 
hinges, window glass, paints, oils, etc. At 
their extensive yards and works in this city 
an average force of 40 workmen and assistants 
are employed. This company contracts from 
first hands in the lumber regions of Michigan, 
from whence their supplies are chiefly derived. 
Thev own extensive planing mills at East 
Saginaw, to which they propose immediately 
to add the amplest facilities for the manufac- 
ture of sash, doors, blinds, mouidings, etc. 
They have recently established a branch office 
and yards at Richmond, Ind., and at their 
different yards and works they furnish re- 
munerative employment to about 100 men in 
the aggregate and transact an annual business 
closelv approximating $350,000. The trade of 
the U"nion City house is principally derived 
from the local markets and within a radius of 
ico miles in every direction, although large 
shipments are frequently made to more remote 
sections of the Union. The individual mem- 
bers of this company are familiar with all 
the departments of their business and widely 
known for their mercantile integrity and ex- 
ecutive ability and who have largely contri- 
buted to the commercial prominence of this 
city as a trade center for lumber supplies for 
Eastern Indiana and Western Ohio. 



UNION CITY BOILER WORKS, 

L. J. Pender, Prop., near Smith 
Bros.' Foundry. 
Among the recent ar.d important accessions- 
to the manufacturing and mechanical opera- 
tions of this section of the state is the inaug- 
uration of the Union City Boiler Works by 
Mr. L. J. Pender. This enterprise had its 
inception in the early part of the present year 
and at the present writing the preparations 
are being made for the erection of suitable 
buildings and the employment of steam power 
for the efficient prosecution of this important 
industry. The Union City Boiler Works will 
occupy a building 25x40 feet in dimensions, 
which will be completed about the time of the 
issue of the present edition of this work, 
situated near Smith Bros.' Machine Shop, be- 
tween the Bee Line R. R. and the Pan Handle 
R. R. tracks, west of thi< city. Employment 
will be given to from five to ten hands during 
the coming year and the most efficient appli- 
ances introduced for the manufacture, from the 
best boiler iron, of portable and stationery 
boilers, while special attention will be given to 
general job work and repairing in this line. 
These shops supply a very important de- 
partment of industry in this section of the 
state and will add materially to the conveni- 
ence of those employing steam power in this 
and adjoining counties of the state and West- 
ern Ohio. Mr. L. J. Pender, the proprietor of 
these works, is a native of Ireland, where he 
was born in 1S4S. He came to this country 
with his parents when but three years of age 
and subsequently learned his trade at Hamil- 
ton, O. He was employed in the shops of 
Gaar, Scott & Co., of Richmond, for 12 years. 
For about one year he held the position of 
foreman in the works of Wysor, Haines & Co., 
of Muncie, coming to thfs city in January, 
1SS3. His thorough mechanical skill and long 
experience will commend him for thorough 
workmanship and to liberal public considera- 
tion. 

S. J. FISHER, 

Coal, Wood and Lime; Office, Cor. 

Columbia St. and Railroad. 
Contributing in a marked degree to the 
commercial operations of our growing towns 
and cities, the transactions in wood and coal 
form, in the aggregate, no inconsiderable item. 
The wood and coal yards of Mr. S. J. Fisher 
were originally started about six years ago and 
came into the possession of the present pro- 
prietor in 1SS0, since which time the transac- 
tions in these commodities have had a steady 
and gradual increase. This house enjoys the 
amplest facilities for securing supplies in both 
hard and sott coal and wood and its annual 
transactions now reach from 300 to 500 cords 
of wood and from 150 to 200 car loads of coal 1 , 
selling chiefly from the Hocking and Jackson 
mines. They also sell about 20 car loads of 
lime, the general trade embracing this and 
adjoining counties of Eastern Indiana and 
Western Ohio. Mr. Fisher is a native of 



UNION CITY. 



183 



Pittsburg, Pa., where he was born in 1853, 
coming to this state in 1878. In 18S0 he suc- 
ceeded his father in business at the same 
stand. This house is the pioneer and leading 
one in this line in this city and enjoys tele- 
phonic communication with all surrounding 
towns. 



SMITH BROS., 

Steam Engines and Machinery. 
For places where a stationery vertical en- 
gine is required, it is now believed that the 
nearest approach to absolute perfection has 
been reached in the "American Giant Engine," 
manufactured by the enterprising firm of 
Smith Bros., of Union City, Ind., which is re- 
garded by practical engineers and mechani- 
cans as one of the most compact, simple, 
desirable and efficient engines for a variety of 
uses now before the public. This engine is 
constructed with a special view to artistic 
form and a distribution of metal so as to secure 
the maxium of strength with the minimum of 
weight and with a due regard to the best 
known rules and maxims of engineering. 
These engines, ranging from four to fifteen 
horse power are kept constantly in stock or 
can be supplied on short notice by this firm, 
while those from 20 to 75 horse power are 
built to order only. This representative firm, 
the only one in Union City engaged in this 
special branch of industry, also manufacture 
steam pumps, boiler feeders, steam pumping 
engines for water works, with capacity of from 
300 to 3,000 gallons per minute, jet pumps, 
force pumps, etc. They also make a specialty 
of the construction and equipment of flouring 
mills upon improved scientific plans and of 
repairing all descriptions of steam engines, 
flouring mills and general machinery. This 
business was established in 1875 by iis present 
proprietors and from a comparatively small 
beginning has grown to be one of Union 
City's most important industrial institutions. 
The works are eligibly located on the out- 
skirts of the city, between the tracks of the 
Pan Handle and Bee Line railroads, where 
they occupy a two story brick building 30x60 
feet in dimensions, thoroughly equipped with 
all the requisite machinery and appliances, 
operated by one 12 horsepower engine. Eight 
skilled workmen are regularly employed and 
their products find a ready sale within a 
radius of 100 miles. The individual members 
of the firm, VV. R., J. H. and John Smith, are 
natives of Scotland but have resided in Indi- 
ana for the past 12 years. Mr. W. R. Smith 
at the present time occupies the responsible 
position of Superintendent of the City Water 
Works, a position he is eminently qualified by 
education and ability. This firm also conduct 
a flouring mill three miles west of this city, 
on the Bee Line R. R., known as the "Harris- 
ville Flouring Mills. These mills are sup- 
plied with new roller process and latest devised 
machinery for the manufacture of the best 
grades of family flour. They do both mer- 
chant and custom grinding, their products 



finding a ready sale in this part of the state for 
its uniform superior excellence and standard 
value. 



TURPEN & HARRIS, 

Wholesale and Retail Grocers, No. 

32 Columbia St. 
The firm of Turpen & Harris necessarily 
occupy a conspicuous and prominent position 
as having conduced in no small degree to the 
present mercantile importance and manufac- 
turing thrift of the community. This old 
established house, which had its inception 
more than a quarter of a century ago, came 
into the possession of the present firm in 1S71, 
at which time they succeeded E. H. Turpen. 
The premises occupied, at No. 32 Columbia 
St., comprise two entire floors, each 24x70 
feet in dimensions, filled to their utmost stor- 
age capacity with a general assortment of 
staple and fancy family groceries, teas, coffees, 
spices, sugars, syrups, canned and bottled 
goods, tobaccos and general merchandise per- 
taining to this special branch of trade, which, 
owing to their facilities, they are enabled to 
offer to their patrons generally at wholesale or 
retail at prices which will defy successful com- 
petition, even from contemporaneous estab- 
lishments in the larger cities. In addition to 
their extensive grocery trade, this firm trans- 
acts a heavy wholesale shipping business in 
farm and dairy produce, noticed elsewhere in 
this work. 



ORR HOUSE, 

William A. Orr, Proprietor. 
It is now more than 30 years ago since the 
popular hotel now known as the Orr House, 
in honor of Mr. William Orr, Sr., one of the 
early pioneers of this section, was opened to 
the public. It is located on the line between 
Indiana and Ohio and was erected for its pres- 
ent purposes by Mr. Sanders, who conducted 
it successfully for several years as the "State 
Line House." The original proprietor was 
succeeded by Mr. William Breckenridge and 
he in turn by Mr. J. H.Jenkins, whoconducted 
the hotel for about five years, when in 1SS0 
he disposed of his interest to the present 
genial proprietor, Mr. William A. Orr, 
whose experience in the hotel line dates back 
to the good old pioneer days before the era of 
railroads and telegraphs, when his father 
opened a hotel for the accomodation of the 
traveling public in the clearing near Emmetts- 
ville, in this county, which was noted far and 
wide for the cheery welcome and generous 
hospitality accorded to its patrons. This was 
but a log cabin, known to the old settlers and 
traveling public as the "National House," and 
the memory of it still is cherished by many 
yet living. The Orr House is almost as 
widely known to the residents of the two 
states and enjoys a vastly more extended 
reputation with the general traveling public. 
While making no pretensions to lavish style 
so much affected by more pretentious houses, 
and which usually consists of great display of 



184 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



tableware, with corresponding scarcity of 
food, the Orr House spares no efforts or 
endeavors to render the stay of quests com- 
fortable and agreeable, and its tables are at all 
times generously supplied with the substan- 
tial and delicacies of the season in great 
abundance and served in the most attractive 
and appetizing style of the culinary art. The 
transient rates at the Orr House have been 
fixed at the moderate sum of $100 per 
day and guests who may have had the 
good fortune to avail themselves of the hos- 
pitality of Mr. Orr will find all the comforts 
and conveniences of a pleasant and agreeable 
home. Mr. W. A Orr, I he proprietor of the 
house, was born in Fayette County, O., 
and came with his parents to this county 
when he was but two years old. He was for- 
merly engaged in the dry goods, grocery, 
notion and liquor trade at Emmittsville, this 
county, and came to Union City in 185S, at 
■which time he purchased the stock of Brown 
& Archard, on the Ohio side. He conducted 
this business, running three notion wagons on 
the road, up to 1S76. He was subsequently 
engaged in the pump business up to 1SS0, at 
which time he engaged in the hotel business. 



well feel proud and one to which he was justly 
entitled, serving as he did from the time of 
the first call down to the close of the war. He 
was with Patterson at the time of the first 
battle of Bull Run and was subsequently in 
everv prominent engagement of the Army of 
the Potomac up to the close of the war and 
was present at the surrender of both Lee's and 
Johnson's forces. 



UNION CITY FOUNDRY, 

James Patchell, Prop., W. Pearl St. 

Although having been established as re- 
cently as 1SS2, the Union City Foundry, con- 
ducted by Mr. James Patchell, has already 
attained a' prominence entitling it to conspicu- j 
ous recognition among the representative 1 
establishments of our thriving inland metropo- 
lis. The foundry building, located on West 
Pearl St, is a one" story structure 30x50 feet in 
dimensions, thoroughly equipped with all the 
requisite appliances and accessories for turn- 
ing out fine castings of any description, from 
the smallest to those of one ton weight. The 
engine house and pattern department is 24x30 
feet in size and one 12 horse power engine and 
boiler furnishes the motive power required in 
the manufacturing departments. Special at- 
tention is devoted to the production of fine 
castings of every description, parts of ma- 
chinery and to general jobbing in all branches 
pertaining to this special line of industry. 
Colonel Patchell is a practical mechanican and 
thoroughly conversant with all the details of 
the business in which he is engaged. He 
enlisted in 1S61 under the first call for volun- 
teer as private in Company D, 13th Pennsyl- 
vania Infantry, serving one month as Duty 
Sergeant and two months as Orderly. At the 
expiration of his first term of service he re- 
enlisted for three years, or during the war, in 
the I02d Pennsylvania Infantry, receiving 
commission of First Lieutenant. He was sub- 
sequently promoted by successive steps until 
securing five commissions from the state of 
Pennsylvania and one from the United Stites 
Government. For meritorious conduct as a 
soldier he had the honor to receive, while yet 
holding the position of Captain, the title of 
Brevet Colonel, a position of which he may 



LEW SUTTON, 

Pianos and Organs, 86 Opera Block. 
The leading establishment of Eastern Indi- 
ana engaged in this important department of 
our commercial system and the only one in 
Union City dealing exclusively in musical 
merchandise, is that located in the Opera 
Block and conducted by Mr. Lew Sutton, a 
gentleman eminently qualified by education 
and experience for securing and retaining the 
confidence of his patrons and the community 
at large by a system of honorable dealing and 
conscientious adherence to facts in all repre- 
sentations made by him as to the merits and 
advantages of the various instruments now 
before the public. Mr. Sutton is exclusive 
agent in this section for the celebrated Ster- 
ling and Bridgeport (Conn.) organs and carries 
in stock a large variety of instruments from 
the most noted manufactories of the Union, 
including the Mathusheck, Chickering and 
Hazelton pianos and the Clough and Warren 
J. Church ^c Co., Sterling, Sutton and other 
celebrated organs, together with piano and 
organ stools, orguinnettes, organinos, sheet 
music, instruction books and musical mer- 
chandise generally. By special arrangements 
with publishers, he is enabled to furnish on 
short notice and at publishers' prices any 
music not kept in stock. Mr. Sutton is a 
native and lifelong resident of Indiana and 
has been engaged in his present business for 
the past five years. He oilers to his patrons, 
whether purchasing for cash or on time, in- 
ducements which cannot be readily duplicated 
veen in the larger cities. 



A. L. SIMMONS, 

Dealer in Coal and Wood, Flour 
and Feed, Northwest Cor. Oak and 
Howard Sis. 
As a class of industries which contribute in 
a marked degree to the comforts and require- 
ments of all communities, the branches of 
trade in which Mr. Simmons is engaged are 
entitled to special recognition in a review of 
the progressive industries of this county and 
state. Mr. Simmons commenced his present 
enterprise at the same location about one year 
ago and occupies a large wareroom, on the 
northwest corner of Howard and Oak Sts., 
where he enjoys the amplest facilities for 
handling the commodities in which he deals, 
embracing both hard and soft coal and wood, 
flour and feed. He is able to supply these 
commodities in city or country in small quan- 
tities or carload lots upon as reasonable terms 
as any dealer in Eastern Indiana. He sup- 



UNION CITY. 



185 



plies wood either in cord-wood lengths or cut 
and split to any desired dimensions. He also 
handles the best grades of family flour, meal 
and feed, in which his facilities enable him to 
compete in quality and price with any con- 
temporaneous house in Eastern Indiana. Mr. 
Simmons is a native of this county, where he 
was born in 1852. Here his entire life has 
been spent and his business operations con- 
ducted. Previous to engaging in his present 
enterprise he was engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits. His office has telephonic communica- 
tions with all parts of the city and adjoining 
towns. 



HOOK BROS. & CO., 

Butter Tubs and Pails. 
In 1869 the firm ot Hook Bros, commenced 
the manufacture of butter tubs and pails at 
Cardington, O., removing to this place in 
1877. These works are among the most im- 
portant of the kind in the West, turning out 
annually not less than 130,000 pails and tubs 
of all sizes, which are extensively used by 
Messrs. Turpen Ac Harris (members of the 
firm), who are extensive produce dealers, and 
are shipped in large quantities to various por- 
tions of the Union. About two acres are 
occupied for yards and factory and employ- 
ment furnished to about 30 workmen. The 
individual members of the firm as at present 
organized are W. J. Hook, C. S. Hook, E. M. 
Tansey and Messrs. Turpen & Harris, of 
this city. 

WILLIAM THOKEY, 

Merchant Tailor and Dealer in 
Hats, Caps and Furnishing Goods, 
No. 53 Oak St. 
The leading house in Union City making a 
specialty of manufacturing fine suits and gar- 
ments to order and dealing in gentlemen's 
furnishing goods, hats, caps, etc., is that con- 
ducted by Mr. William Thokey,at No. 53 Oak 
St., which was established by its present enter- 
prising proprietor in 1S7S. Sir. Thokey occu- 
pies at the location above named two entire 
floors, each 1SX46 feet in dimensions, where, 
in addition to his desirable and fashionable 
stock of hats, and furnishing goods of every 
description, he carries a seasonable and attrac- 
tive line of the choicest fabrics of imported 
and American piece goods for gentlemen's 
wear, from which patrons and customers may 
make their selections and have full suits made 
to order at prices ranging from $12 to $35, and 
other garments at proportionately low rates. 
Ten competent and experienced assistants are 
employed in the manufacturing department 
and all work is guaranteed to be first class in 
cut, workmanship and finish. Mr. Thokey, 
who is a native of Germany, was born in 1S26. 
He learned the trade of tailor in the "Father- 
land," where the system of apprenticeship is 
much more thorough than in this country, 
more than a quarter of a century ago, coming 
to this country and landing at New York in 
1S52. He has resided in Indiana for the past 



27 years and during this entire period has been 
engaged in this same branch of business, 
working for other parties prior to embarking 
in business on his own account as above noted. 



"THE WINSLOW," 

Cor. Oak and Howard Sts.; Levi 

Winslow, Prop. 
Among the most deservedly popular cara- 
vansaries of Eastern Indiana, "the "Winslow" 
claims conspicuous consideration, both on 
account of its eligible location, the taste with 
which its rooms are furnished and its efficient 
management This popular hotel was estab- 
lished many years ago, since which time 
various changes have taken place in its name 
and management, coming into the hands of 
the present proprietor in September, 1S82, at 
which time its name was changed to the 
"Winslow" and numerous important improve- 
ments were introduced. The hotel structure, 
which is two and a half stories and full base- 
ment in height, covers a ground space of 40x60 
feet and contains 30 spacious, well lighted and 
ventilated rooms, which have been recentlv 
renovated, refitted and refurnished in elegant 
and attractive style. The dining room, with 
seating capacity for 32 guests, is in a semi- 
basement, with excellent light and ventilation, 
and the kitchen and culinary departments are 
on the same floor. On the first floor proper is 
a spacious and conveniently arranged orfice, 
gentlemen's sitting room, a fine sample room 
for the accommodation of commercial travel- 
ers, lavatory and three sleeping rooms. On 
the second floor is the ladies' parlor and recep- 
tion room, and the remainder of the hou^e is 
devoted to sleeping apartments and gi.est 
chambers. The rates at the "Winslow" have 
been reduced to the popular price of $1.50 per 
day and its patronage is derived from regular 
boarders and transient guests. Mr. Levi Win- 
slow, who is a native and lifelong resident of 
this state, was born in 1S36. He has been for 
the past eight years identified with the hotel 
business, with all departments of which he is 
thoroughly familiar. He is peculiarly quali- 
fied by nature and experience for the position 
which he so acceptably fills. He spares no 
pains to render pleasant the stay of his patrons 
and is ever ready to contribute to all essential 
requirements of his patrons. 

LEVI HOMMOWUN, 

Manufacturer of Fine Havana and 
Domestic Cigars, Opera House Block. 
Since the earlier days the luxury of block- 
ing has grown with the growth of the country 
and increased in its popularity to the pres rit 
day. Perhaps no one thing lias contributed '.o 
this result more than have such establish- 
ments as that of Mr. Levi Hqmmowun, in the 
production of delicious and popular brands of 
cigars. Mr. Hommowun is a native of Mont- 
gomery County, O., where he was born in 
1S43. He learned his trade at Germantown, 
O., m 1S55, completing it in 1S5S. He subse- 
quently worked at his trade at that place and 



186 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



at Winchester, O. In i860 he commenced 
business on his own account at Germantown, 
O., and in 1872 removed to Middletown, O., 
where he remained for about three years, when 
he came, in 1875, to this place, where for the 
most part he has been engaged in business 
ever since. At the present time he oocupies 
five large rooms on the second floor of the 
Opera House Block, where he gives employ- 
ment to an average force of 18 experienced 
cigar makers, turning out between 6co,coo and 
800,000 cigars annually, which find a ready 
sale in various sections of Eastern Indiana and 
Western Ohio. The leading brand of ten cent 
cigars is "Highest Award." The principal 
five cent cigars are "Hommowun's Yacht," a 
cigar which has not a superior, if indeed it has 
an equal, in the market for the price, and also 
the "Harmony," "Buds of Promise" and "Try 
One," which have secured a large popularity 
and sale. The long experience and popular 
favor which this establishment has enjoyed 
places it among the leading houses of its class 
in the county. 



MRS. D. B. COWDERY, 

Millinery and Trimmings, 2d Door 
From Worthington's Corner. 
This fashionable millinery emporium had 
its origin by its present management about 
four years ago. The premises occupied are 
15x50 feet in dimensions and are located two 
doors from the old Worthington corner, on 
Oak St. Mrs. Cowdery carries in season at 
all times a full and complete line of newest 
6tyles and designs of millinery goods, em- 
bracing latest styles of patterns, hats and bon- 
nets simultaneous with their appearance in 
our metropolitan cities, also ribbons, feathers, 
flowers, trimmings, etc., and her facilities are 
not surpassed for securing not only newest 
styles but the neatest and highest taste in the 
trimming department, in which special pains 
is taken to secure the pleasure of patrons. 

E. HORNBERGER, 

Manufacturer of Choice Havana 
and Domestic Cigars, West Oak St. 
The enterprise of Mr. Hornberger had its 
origin in 1882, at which time he commenced 
business in a small room at the rear of J. D. 
Carson's grocery. One year ago, for the pur- 
pose ot securing larger spac 1 for his growing 
business, he removed to his present rooms, 
No. 9S West Oak St., where he manufactures 
the best brands sold in the market for five 
cents and ten cents, turning out about 150,000 



cigars annually. His ten cent cigar is known 
as "The American Queen," while his five 
cent cigars are known as "Hummy's Best," 
"Standard," "The Artistic," Little Beauties" 
and "Powhattans Sport." These cigars are 
disposed of to jobbers and to dealers in various 
sections of Eastern Indiana and Western Ohio 
and are recognized as standard goods in all 
sections in which they have been introduced. 
Mr. Hornberger is a native of Montgomery 
County, O., and was born at Dayton in 1S59. 
He learned his trade in this city, where he 
has resided for the past 16 years. After work- 
ing at his trade for some years he decided to 
commence business on his own account, in 
which he has met with an established and 
gradually growing trade. 



VALENTINE ROMEISER, 

Manufacturer and Repairer of 
Wagons, Carriages and Buggies, No. 
100 West Oak St. 
Mr. Romeiser, the proprietor of the wagon 
shop at No. 100 West Oak St., is a native of 
Hesse Nassau (formerly Cour Hesse), in Ger- 
many, where he was born in 184S. In 1S66 he 
came to this country, landing at New York, 
coming to this city in 1S67. He worked at his 
trade in the old country, but completed it in 
Winchester, this county". He opened a shop 
for himself for a short time but afterward sold 
out and after working for others opened his 
present works about one year ago. His shop 
embraces a large room, where he is prepared 
to put up to order every description of wagons 
or buggies and do all kinds of repairing in 
this line. As an experienced workman and 
old citizen of this city he is justly entitled to 
the notice here given. 



The following are the other more important 
firms not mentioned: 

Dry Goods, Groceries, Boots and 
Shoes.— R. Kirshbaum & Co., J. Schricker, 
G. Stumpp, M. L. Walden, D. A. Williams & 
Co., Gordon & Gi>t, W. K. Smith. 

Miscellaneous. — Ohio Flouring Mills, G. 
W. Ross, carriages; B. H. Read, furniture; 
M. Best, jeweler; Lambert, Parent & Co., 
grain; C. S. Hardy, drugs; Jaqua & Hardv, 
hardwaie; H. Stoner, marble works; Wright 
& Stoner, furniture; J. W. Lambert & Co., 
saw mill; T. A. Gross & Co., undertakers; A. 
H. Ebernez, grocer, W. Lambert & Co., har- 
ness; Miss M. Kerr, milliner; Miss M. E. 
Tyler, photographs; Humrichouse & Bros., 
meats. 



RIDGEVILLE, 



The first white settler in thig part of the 
county was Mr. Mechach Lewallyn, an old 
man with a large family who settled near 
this place in 1817. Mr. Jacob Ward and 
Joseph Ward came in April, 1819. Other 
new settlers followed, and prior to the 
laying out of the present town of Ridge- 
ville many settlements existed, and the 
county seat had already become a con- 
siderable trading town, and was the gen- 
eral center of commercial operations of 
this section. A small village was com- 
menced to the west of the present Wal- 
nut street, which was called Xewton, but 
in 1852 the town of Ridgeville was laid 
out embracing the former village of New- 
ton. The first store was kept by Arthur 
McKew and the next by Robert Starbuck; 
Sr., about 1849. Mechach Lewallyn and 
James Jacobs were members of the first 
petit jury of the county. The first mill 
in the county was built near this place by 
Mr. Lewallyn, in 1819; but it should be 
noted that the Indian trading post which 
was near here, carried on by David Con- 
nors, is probably entitled to the credit of 
the first regular commercial operations. 
This post was established prior to the ad- 
mission of the state into the Union, or 
about that time. Wm. Matts, now one 
of the old citizens of Ridgeville, was born 
in New Jersey in 1796. He is one of the 
veterans of the war of 1812, and came 
to this State in 1836. The first mill was 
known as the "Old River Mill." Steam 
was put in in 1867. While the town may 
not be credited with rapid growth it en- 
joys to-day not only the advantages of a 
fine and rich soil in its surroundings, and 
a more than usually intelligent and enter- 



prising class of farmers. These have not 
only contributed character to the town, 
but have induced a corresponding class in 
the citizens of the place. The general 
moral tone of the place is much above the 
average, and among its citizeus and busi- 
ness men are found many of education, 
culture and refinement. A fine college 
building has been erected by the Free- 
Will Baptist denomination, which, it is 
hoped may, at no distant day, be fully 
completed and sustained. At present there 
being no regular public school building 
in the place, the ample rooms already 
completed in this building afford the re- 
quired accommodations of the city for its 
public schools which, are ably conducted. 
Some of the professors of the college dur- 
ing certain seasons of the year conduct a 
school, supplying students with all the ad- 
vantages afforded in our more renowned 
institutions. Ridgeville is situated eight 
miles north of the county seat, and con- 
tains a population of about 1,200 inhabi- 
tants. It is well provided with shipping 
facilities at the crossing of the Grand 
Rapids Railroad running north and south 
and the Pan Handle east and west. There 
are two churches, M. E. Church and 
Christion Church; the Baptist holding 
services in the college building. The 
manufacturing facilities, which contri- 
bute to its importance in many distant 
sections of the Union are chiefly noticed 
editorially in the pages of this work, as 
is also its leading business houses, which 
will compare favorably with any town of 
its class in the state, and in the enterpris- 
ing spirit of its business men and citizens 
it has few equals. 



RIDGEVILLE BANK, 

This bank was organized under the state 
banking laws July ist, iSSo, with an author- 
ized capital of $30,000. The buildingoccupied 
is an elegant two story structure, 22x50 feet in 
-aize, and has just been completed. The firm 
transact a regular banking business, negotiate 
Joans, buy and sell negotiable paper, bonds, 



drafts, etc., pay interets on time deposits, loan 
money on approved security, etc. Arthur 
McKew was the former President, but Thomas 
Ward, of Winchester, is at present acting in 
that capacity. James Charles, a native of 
Wayne County, who has resided here since 
1SS0, having come from Winchester in that 
year, is the efficient Cashier. He was for- 



188 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



merly in charge of an Indian school in the far 
"West and has traveled extensively through the 
Western states and territories. George A. 
Payne is the Assistant Cashier. Under their 
management the success of the Ridgeville 
Bank is a foregone conclusion and is justly 
regarded as being one of the most reliable 
monetary institutions in this section. 

BARNES & SEANEY, 

Proprietors Ridgeville Handle Fac- 
tory, North of Depot. 
Among those enterprises which exercise a 
controlling influence upon the progressive 
interests of this county and Eastern Indiana 
are the Ridgeville Handle Factory and the 
associated interests of its manufacturing and 
commercial operations. This factory was 
originally started by A. K. Press & Co., in 
1S79, at which time "they commenced business 
in a comparatively small way in a building 
located east of the "depot. In the latter part of 
1SS0 or early in 1SS1 their place was destroyed 
by fire, when they again established business 
and erected the works now conducted by this 
company. They continued the business up to 
about January 1st, 1SS4, at which time the 
present proprietors rented the machinery, 
buildings and grounds for one year. The 
present firm is composed of Granville Barnes 
and John W. Seaney. Mr. Barnes is a native 
of Wayne County, this state, where he was 
born in 1S57. He came to this county with 
his parents when quite young and has chiefly 
been engaged in agricultural pursuits up to 
1S76, when he engaged in milling business at 
Stone Station, where he conducted a saw mill 
for about two years, after which he sold out 
and purchased.'in connection with George W. 
Wesler, a handle factory located at the same 
place. In March, 1SS2, a boiler explosion 
with unfortunate results occurred, after which 
the business was closed and Mr. Barnes pur- 
chased a saw mill at that place, which, in con- 
nection with Mr. Albert S. Freeman, is still 
carried on, under the general management of 
Mr. Freeman. Mr. Seaney is noticed else- 
where in connection with the boot and shoe 
and the grocery and provision trade of this 
place. For many years identified with the 
business and commercial operations of this 
county, he has estab'ished a wide acquaintance 
and influence in business circles both at home 
and abroad. The present works and ground 
cover a space of one-halt acre, although much 
more ground space is occupied, while the 
works are provided with latest improved labor 
saving machinery for the rapid production of 
broom, hoe, rake and fork handles. , These 
handles are manufactured from the best white 
ash and are guaranteed to bear favorable com- 
parison with the products of any contem- 
poraneous establishment in the West. The 
machinery is propelled by a 40 horse power 
engine and boiler and the mills have a 
capacity of 3 oco handles per day. Employ- 
ment is usually given to about 12 hands at 
these works and the annual transactions will 



average from $35,000 to $40,000, their pro- 
ducts being chiefly shipped to Jackson, Mich.,. 
Fort Madison, la., and other points. They 
carry in stock over 18,000 square feet of logs- 
and are prepared to fill orders on short notice- 

L. N. COOK, 

Dealer in Farming Implements, Bug- 

gies, Wagons, etc. 
The opening of Mr. Cook's establishment in 
1SS3 was a business venture that supplied the 
farmers of thi< wealthy and prosperous section- 
with some of the best and most serviceable im- 
plements ever offered to the farmers of this and 
adjoining counties. At his establishment may 
be found at all times a full line of the latest 
improved and most popular farm implements 
and machinery, besides buggies, carriages, 
farm wagons, etc., which he is able to offer at 
manufacturers' prices. Among the well 
known implements which he controls for this 
section may be mentioned the "Minneapolis 
Harvester," "Furst i: Bradley," "Moline" and 
"Red Jacket" plows, and other makes from 
manufactories at Hamilton, O., and Spring- 
field, O. The "Advance" threshers and 
engines are handled and the "Buckeye" and 
"Baker" grain drills are kept in stock. ' In the 
line of vehicles, he handles the well known 
"Winchester" Wagon and the best makes of 
Cincinnati buggies. He employs one travel- 
salesman, whose field extends throughout the 
rich agricultural regions surrounding Ridge- 
ville, and the trade of the house altogether 
amounts to fully $io,coo annually. Mr. 
Cook's ■ alesroom is 20x60 feet in area, in addi- 
tion to vhich he utilizes a room 25XS0 feet in> 
dimer ions for storage purposes, thus giving 
him r *nple facilities for carrying in stock dur- 
ing /ie season a full variety of the best 
machinery in use for personal inspection- 
Even in the brief time he has been engaged in 
the trade he has made this house the leading 
one in this section of the state, presenting the 
strongest inducements to farmers in agricul- 
tural implements, farm wagons and buggies- 
Mr. Cook is a native of Jay County, Ind., but 
came here about seven years ago, since which 
time he has been engaged in the boot and shoe 
business previous to engaging in his present 
enterprise. 



GEORGE SIEGLER, 

Bakery, Confectionery and Lunch 

Room, North Walnut St. 
This is one of the best arranged and most 
cleanly kept houses of its class to be found in 
this county. Mr. Siegler first started in busi- 
ness here in 1S77, when he commenced in a 
comparatively small way, but by the manu- 
facture of the best quality of family bread, 
pies, cakes, etc., he has succeeded in building 
up an established and substantial trade. The 
premises occupied embrace a fine business 
room 20x40 feet in size, where he carries at all 
times a full and complete assortment of bread, 
cakes, pies, rolls, crackers, confectioneries, 



RIDGEVILLE. 



189 



canned goods, etc., besides a well selected 
assortment of staple and fancy groceries and 
provisions, tobaccos, cigars, notions, etc. In 
addition to his stock, he is prepared to supply 
on short, notice tine cakes for weddings, parties 
or other delicacies for picnics and to furnish 
good lunch at all times. Mr. Siegler is a 
native of Wurtemburg, Germany, where he 
was born in 1855. He came to this country in 
1872, landing at New York. He afterward 
went to Cincinnati, O., where he learned the 
baking business and worked at his trade in 
some of the best houses in that city and Dav- 
ton, O., previous to coming to this city in 1S77. 
His store is one of the best conducted of the 
kind to be found in the county and is well 
worthy the liberal patronage it enjoys. 

S. R. ALLEN, 

Attorney at-Law and Dealer in 
Drugs and Medicines, Books, Sta- 
tionery, etc. 
This house was originally established by 
Mr. Allen in 1S74 in a comparatively small 
way. The premises now occupied embrace a 
general salesroom 20x50 feet in dimensions, 
while in the rear is a wareroom used for stor- 
age purposes. The stock embraces a full line 
of pure drugs and medicines, all popular pro- 
prietary medicines, perfumeries and toilet arti- 
cles in large variety, paints, oils and varnishes, 
window glass, lamps and fixtures, school and 
miscellaneous books, tobaccos, cigars, etc., 
while the annual transactions will aggregate 
from $10,000 to $12,000. Special attention is 
given to the accurate compounding of physi- 
cians' prescriptions and family recipes, while 
his stock of wall and window papers embraces 
newest patterns and designs. Mr. S. R. Allen 
is a native of Sullivan County, N. Y., where 
his early life was spent. At the outbreak ot 
the rebellion he enlisted for three years in the 
123d New York Volunteer Infantry and after 
the capture of Atlanta was placed in charge of 
government stores at that point, receiving an 
honorable discharge at the close of the war. 
Previous to entering the army (in 1S5S) he 
engaged in the study of medicine. He subse- 
quently turned his attention to the study and 
practice of law and was admitted to the "bar at 
Winchester, in this county, in 1S69. While 
conducting his present commercial enterprise 
he also gives special attention to his law prac- 
tice, in which his efficiency and reliability as a 
counsellor eminently commend him. ' He 
gives special attention to the drawing of deeds, 
mortgages and other legal papers and patrons 
who may have collections or other legal busi- 
ness in this section will do well to consult him. 

MANN & SCOTT, 

Groceries, Provisions, etc. 
These gentlemen opened their house to the 
public on the 16th of April, 1S83. They carry 
as fine a line of staple and fancy groceries, 
tamily provisions, seasonable produce, canned 
goods, confectioneries, cigars, tobaccos, etc., as 
can be found in this section, while their prices 



are not duplicated by any similar establish- 
ment in the county. Their commodious sales- 
room is 25x45 feet in size and is constantly 
filled with the best grades of home supplies in 
this department of trade. The trade of this 
house embraces already many of the best 
families of both city and surrounding country. 
Both members of the firm devote their per- 
sonal attention to the interests of their busi- 
ness and a prominent characteristic of their 
house is the prompt and courteous treatment 
received by patrons. Mr. A. A. Mann was 
born in this state in 1S52 and his partner, Mr. 
D. C. Scott, is also a native of this state and is 
at present serving as Town Clerk. 

CHAMPE SISTERS, 

Millinery and Dress Making, East 

Side Walnut Sr. 
The leading millinery house in this part of 
the county and one which draws a large 
patronage from the adjoining counties i* that 
conducted by the Champe Sisters, in Ridge- 
ville. These ladies commenced their business 
here in September, 1SS2, since which time the 
completeness of their stock and the neatness 
and excellence of their work have contributed 
to secure a constantly increasing trade. They 
occupy a centrally located room, in which 
they carry in season a first class stock of 
fashionable millinery goods, hats, bonnets, 
flowers, feathers, trimmings, ribbons, etc., and 
are careful to secure newest pattern hats and 
newest designs and styles of trimming as soon 
as they make their appearance in our Eastern 
cities. Special attention is paid to neat and 
tasteful trimming and every effort made to 
meet the desires of their patrons in this re- 
spect. They are also prepared to execute 
dress and cloak making in newest "styles, 
receiving each season the latest reports in 
styles, guaranteeing first class work, good fits 
and reasonable prices. The long experience 
these ladies have enjoved make them thor- 
oughly familiar with the business in which 
thev are engaged. 



A. J. WOOD, 

Groceries and Crockery. 
Mr. A. J. Wood founded this hou<e 16 years 
ago. The business was small at first but at 
the present time it is among the most reliable 
business houses in Ridgeville, while its trade 
and annual business will compare favorably 
with that of similar establishments in this sec- 
tion. The storeroom occupied is 21x50 feet in 
size and the stock carried includes a fine line 
of staple and fancy groceries, family provi- 
sions, produce, canned goods, etc., always pure 
and fresh. The stock of crockery, queens- 
ware, etc., to be found here is very full and 
complete and this house is the recognised 
headquarters for goods in that line. Mr. Wood 
is a native of Randolph County, this state, and 
was born in 1S42. He is one of our most 
enterprising merchants and deserves the suc- 
cess with which he has met. 



190 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



W. H. WHIPPLE, 

Drugs and Medicines, West Side 
Main St. 

The present business had its origin about iS 
years ago with Messrs. Kitselman & Ward, 
who sold out some three years later to Messrs. 
Fisher & Taylor and they in turn to Mr. 
William Cook. The store next came into the 
hands of Mr. Olney Whipple, in 1875, who 
conducted the business up to 1S79, at which 
time Dr. C C. Hiatt controlled the business 
up to 1SS2, when Mr. A. S. Hunt assumed the 
management for a brief period, subsequently 
selling to his son, Mr. Thomas M. Hunt, of 
whom the present proprietor purchased, No- 
vember 25th, 1SS3. The premises occupied 
embrace a general salesroom 16x36 feet in 
size, besides a room in the rear 12x16 feet in 
dimensions. The main salesroom is stocked 
with a full and complete line of pure drugs 
and medicines, all popular proprietary medi- 
cines, perfumeries and toilet articles, paints-, 
oils and varnishes, pure wines and liquors for 
medicinal and sacramental purposes, tobaccos 
and cigars, notions, etc. A special department 
is fitted up in the rear of the salesroom for the 
accurate compounding of physicians' prescrip- 
tions and family recipes. Mr. Whipple is a 
native of this state, where he was born in 1S51. 
His early lite was chiefly spent on the farm 
up to the time he was 17 years of age. He 
was subsequently engaged in school teaching 
and previous to coming to this place and 
engaging in his present business was for two 
years proprietor of a drug store at Hartford, 
Minnesota. 



GEO. L. GEGNER, 

Harness, Saddles, Collars, Bridles, 
etc., 

This well known house was opened to the 
public fully a quarter of a century ago, by a 
Mr. Mills, and is now one of the oldest es- 
tablished houses of the kind in the county. 
Mr. Mills was succeeded by H. Dungan, and 
he by the present proprietor, about 15 years 
ago. The premises occupied include a sales- 
room 1SX50 feet in size for the display of 
finished work, etc., and a shop 18x24 feet in 
dimensions for manufacture and repair room. 
Fine, light, single and double harness, bridliv,* 
collars, hames, blankets, brushes, ro'^s, 
whips, harness oils, etc., are kept constantly 
in stock, and prices will compare favorably 
with any similar house in Eastern Indiana. 
The trade of the house, since Mr. Gegner as- 
sumed control, has been fully trebled, it now 
amounting to about $3,000 annually. He 
usually employs one assistant, during the 
busy season, and guarantees first-class work- 
manship, every article warranted to be as 
represented. Geo. L. Gegner is a practical 
harness maker, and a native of Germany, but 
was brought to America by his parents when 
but six months old. He was raised in Cincin- 
nati, O., where his parents first located. In 
February, 1S61, he enlisted in the first call for 



75,000 volunteers, in Co. B, 2d Ohio Vol, Inf., 
serving three months. In February, 1864, he 
re-enlisted in the 130th Indiana vol. Inf., in 
which he served nearly two years. He par- 
ticipated in the memorable Georgia campaign 
including Sherman's famous March to the Sea 
as far as Atlanta, and after the engagement of 
Atlanta his corps was sent to re-enforce Gen. 
Thomas, and the battle of Nashville was his 
next severe engagement. For honorable and 
meritorious conduct he was promoted to first 
lieutenant by Gov. Morton, October 15th, 1865, 
and was mustered out and honorably dis- 
charged December 14, 1865, coming to this 
city in 1S69. 



S. B PAYNE, 

Stoves and Tinware. 
In a review of the commercial and business 
interests of this county, and State, it is suita- 
ble that in many of the smaller towns, and 
cities there are "found establishments whose 
efficiency and enterprise will compare favora- 
bly with their more pretensious contempo- 
raries in the larger cities. Mr. Payne 
first began business as a dealer in stoves and 
tinware 13 years ago, since which time he has 
largelv increased his annual transactions and 
succeeded in building up a permanent trade, 
extending to various sections of this and ad- 
joining counties. The premises occupied for 
sales room and manufacturing purposes is 
1SX50 feet in dimensions, in which he carries 
a large and full stock of the best makes and 
latest improved Heating and Cooking Stoves, 
Hollow ware and house keeping articles. In 
addition to the manufacture of tin, copper and 
sheet iron ware, this is the only house in this 
citv prepared to execute in first class style, 
roofing, spouting, guttering etc., and the exe- 
cution of all descriptions of job work pertain- 
ing to this department of trade. Mr. Payne 
was born in Morrow Co., O., in 1S52, but has 
been a resident of this state 15 years. He is a 
practical tinner as well as a reliable and ener- 
getic business man and is justly entitled to 
I the full and liberal notice here accorded 
I among the progressive merchants of this 
j cr anty and state. 



/JUNCTION MILLS, 

W.J. Baughn & Co., Proprietors. 
In the year 1SS2 over 100,000 bushels of 
grain, seeds, etc., were handled by this firm, 
making their annual business amount to over 
$90,000, exclusive of the flour manufactured 
in their mills. The Junction Mills were 
erected six years ago by Arthur McKew, who, 
after two vears of management, was succeeded 
bv C. P. Starr. The present proprietors suc- 
ceeded Mr. Starr in 1SS1. The building is a 
substantial brick structure four stories in 
height, 36x80 feet in dimensions, and two 
warehouses in close proximity, 20xSo and 
26x66 feet in size respectively, with railroad 
switches, giving them complete and conven- 
ient shipping facilities to all points East or 



RIDGEVILLE. 



191 



West, North or South. The mill is trior- 
©ughly equipped, contains three run ot stones 
and the machinery is propelled by a 40 horse 
power engine. Three assistants find employ- 
ment and the mill is run to its utmost capacity, 
which is about 30 barrels in 24 hours. The 
fine grades of flour and feed manufactured 
here meet with ready sale throughout this 
immediate vicinitv. Mr. Baughn was born In 
Ohio in 1S50. fie has resided in this state 
since 1877. His business is one that requires 
a practical knowledge, coupled with business 
capacity and integrity, which are inherited by 
him in no ordinary degree. Mr. W. F. Studu- 
baker is the Company and has been quite 
extensively engaged in the grain business in 
this section of country for the past 17 years. 
He was born in Wells County in 1842. 



H. T. KITSELMAN & CO., 

Dry Goods and Clothing, West Side 

Walnut St. 
This house, having been established 10 
years ago and being the largest and most 
popular establishment in this line in Ridge- 
ville, is entitled to more than ordinary recog- 
nition in our work among the successful 
enterprises of the day. The trade of the house 
has grown fully 500 per cent, since the date of 
its inception and now amounts to fully $40,000 
annually. The premises utilized by the firm 
are large and commodious, comprising two 
floors, each 20x132 feet in size, and is recog- 
nized as one of the leading dry goods houses 
of the county. These rooms are filled with a 
carefully se'ected and tastefully arranged stock 
of foreign and American dry goods, silks, 
cashmeres, muslins, calicos, ginghams, shawls, 
millinery goods, hosiery, notions, etc., while in 
the line of clothing their stock comprises a 
varied assortment of well made goods, every 
article of which is guaranteed to give satisfac- 
tion in every particular. H. T. Kitselman, 
John W. Smith and James W. McCamish are 
the individual members of the firm and are old 
residents of this state. They devote their per- 
sonal attention to the interests of their busi- 
ness and give constant employment to an 
additional force of four competent clerks. 
Promptness, courtesy and fairness are so 
prominently characteristic of the dealings of 
thi> house that it has acquired a popularity 
second to none enjoyed by any similar estab- 
lishment in this section. 



tor, Mr. J. H. Blouch, took charge. Mr. 
Blouch, who is a native of Pennsylvania, is an 
old resident here. He had been engaged in 
agricultural pursuits previous to his present 
occupation. His house is the leading hotel of 
the place. The building is two stories in 
height and 140x140 feet in size. It contains 
apartments sufficient for the accommodation 
of 25 guests and contains all the conveniences 
and comforts of home. The dining room is 
judiciously looked after by the proprietor and 
the table will always be found supplied with 
all the substantial as well as delicacies that 
are required to constitute a faultless menu. 
The sleeping apartments, another important 
feature always looked after by guests, are 
comfortably made and attractively furnished. 



SUMPTION HOUSE, 

J. H. Blouch, Proprietor, 
This widely known and deservedly popular 
house was erected over ^o years ago by Robert 
Sumption, who managed the hotel for a num- 
ber of years, when he was succeeded by Lem. 
Wright. The house next came into the 
hands of Samuel B. Houch, then into the 
possession of Freeman B. French, and next 
passed into the hands of Mr. T. Sumption, 
who is at present Treasurer of Randolph 
County. In April, 1SS3, the present proprie- 



J. W. SEANEY, 

Groceries and Provisions, Boots and 
Shoes, Cor. Walnut and First Sts. 
Long recognized among the most enter- 
prising and solid business men of this section 
of the state, Mr. Seaney has for a period ot 19 
years been identified with its commercial 
operations. The room occupied by Mr. Sea- 
ney is 25x80 feet in area and contains a full 
line of staple and fancy groceries, provisions, 
country produce, canned goods, confection- 
eries, tobaccos, cigars, notions and all desirable 
articles of home supply, while in the line of 
gents', ladies', youths', misses' and children's 
boots and shoes, his stock comprises the best 
and most satisfactory makes from the largest 
and best manufacturers and jobbers in the 
country. The trade of this hou^e embraces 
many of the best families of both town and 
country and will compare favorably with any 
contemporaneous establishment in this part of 
the state. Mr. Seaney is a native of Wayne 
County, Ind., and was born in 1S43. His long 
experience has given him the fullest advant- 
ages in the selection of his stock and the suc- 
cess which has attended his operations justly 
entitles him to the full and liberal notice here 
accorded. 



W. C. STAR BUCK, 
Restaurant. 
This gentleman opened his nicely furnished 
and popular restaurant in May, 1SS3, and has 
charge of the only exclusive business in this 
line in Ridgevil'ie. His trade has grown 
largely since and the future prospects of the 
house are flattering. The premises occupied 
are 40x45 feet in size and one assistant is 
employed. Mr. Starbuck, although a young 
man but 20 years of age, is fully conversant 
with every detail of his business, and no pains 
are spared" to make his establishment-worthy 
of a liberal public patronage. Lunches are 
served at all hours in an approved manner on 
short notice, a regular restaurant business be- 
ing transacted. Parties visiting his place of 
business will always meet with prompt and 
courteous attention" Mr. Starbuck Is a native 
of this state and was born in 1S63. 



192 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



C. D. KINNEY, 

Boots and Shoes, Cor. Walnut and 
Third Sts. 
The popular boot and shoe house of C. D. 
Kinney had its origin about three years ago, 
coming into the hands of the present proprie. 
tor soon after and even at this date he ha s 
secured so fully the public confidence as to 
promise at an early day to outstrip his older 
contemporaries in this county. For this result 
he is not only indebted to the energetic and 
judicious business policy he has adopted but 
also to the superior quality of goods he is care- 
ful to secure for his trade. The premises 
occupied embrace a business room 20x40 feet 
in dimensions, in which he carries a full and 
complete line of gents', ladies, youths', misses' 
and children's boots and shoes, all of standard 
makes, selected with direct reference to the 
requirements of both town and country trade 
,from the best jobbing houses in the country. 
Mr. Kinney, the proprietor of this house, is a 
native of Fairfield, Green County, O., where 
he was born in 1S60. For many years he had 
been engaged in agricultural pursuits prior to 
engaging in his present business. 

J. C. RETTER, 

Carriage and Wagon Works. 
Mr. Retter began business in a small way 
in 1S79 and by the execution of first clas's 
work has built up a liberal trade and patronage 
in this and adjoining counties. He occupies 
for business purposes a building two stories in 
height and containing three departments — the 
woodwork, ironing and repository — the dimen- 
sions of which are -1x50 and 26x30 feet re- 
spectively. Several hands, are employed in the 
busy season and about 25 new vehicles turned 
out annually. Repairing in all its depart- 
ments, both wood and iron, also receives 
prompt and satisfactory attention. His vehi- 
cles are made from the best seasoned timber 
and guaranteed equal to those of any contem- 
poraneous establishment in the state in style, 
finish and durability, and in terms and prices 
he is able to compete with any establishment 
where true value is taken into account. Mr. 
Retter is a native of Wurtemburg, Germany, 
but came to the United States when but two 
years of age. He settled in Preble County, 
O., for some time and removed to Ridgeville 
in 1S79. 



several assistants are employed and prompt 
attention is given to patrons. A native of 
Ohio, Mrs. Wood came here in girlhood, and 
is a practical milliner. Her work and goods 
will not fail to satisfy the wants of even the 
most fastidious. 



MRS. A. J. WOOD, 

Millinery and Notions. 
Mrs. Wood began business in this line here 
10 years ago and now owns the oldest and 
largest millinery house in Ridgeville. Her 
stock includes the latest and most fashionable 
goods in her line and during the busy season 

/ 



OSCAR COOK, 

Livery and Feed Stables, Southeast 
Cor. Walnut and Second Sts. 

The present enterprise had its origin here 
manv vears ago and came into the hands of 
the pre'sent proprietor in 1SS3, as successor to* 
John E. Collins, who had conducted it as suc- 
cessor to L. N. Cook. These stables were 
originally constructed for the purpose for 
which they are used. The building is one 
and a half "stories in height and 40x50 feet in 
dimensions and has a capacity of 50 head of 
horses at one time. Good carriages and 
driving horses are constantly kept for the 
accommodation of citizens and others, em- 
bracing both single and double buggies and 
carriages, which are promptly furnished for 
funerals or weddings. Traveling men or 
others are conveyed to distant points at 
reasonable rates. "Horses are boarded by the 
feed, day or week and in every particular 
these stables will compare favorably with the 
best equipped livery and feed stables in East- 
ern Indiana. Mr. Cook is a native of Jay 
County, this state, where he was born in 1563, 
and has for many years been associated with, 
this branch of business. 



JOHN WELLINGER, 
Meat Market. 
Mr. Wellinger has been identified with this 
business for a period of 16 years, having 
opened his market in 1S67. He disposes of 
about 150 head of fat cattle annually and of 
small stock, sheep, hogs, calves, etc., in pro- 
portion. His market is a model of neatness 
and cleanliness and is 15x20 feet in size, with 
cooling room attached. His meats are in- 
variably pure, fresh and of good quality. Mr. 
Wellinger is a native of Wurtemburg, Ger- 
many, and emigrated to America in 1S66. He 
settled in Pennsylvania, where he resided 
until 1S67, when he came to Ridgeville and 
began the business in which we still find him 
engaged. 

Other more important firms here, are: T. A. 
Graham, hardware; G. Lemarax, grocer ; W.J. 
Shoemaker, drugs; J. F. Ritenour, livery; 
M. R. Hiatt, drugs; Kitselman Bros, hardware 
X. B. Hiatt, drugs; J. B. Hiller, grocer; Mc- 
'.ew & Edger, dry goods; Cunningham & 
Boswell, "xocers. 



FARMLAND. 



This thriving village was originally 
laid out about 1830, at which time many 
settlements had been formal in this sec- 
tion of the county. It is situated 67 
miles Northeast of Indianapolis, on the 
line of the C. C. & St. L. Railway, and 8 
miles west of the county seat. Surrounded 
by a fine agricultural district it enjoys a 
liberal local trade, embracing the residents 
of Monroe and adjacent townships. As 
an indication of its prosperity it should 
be noted that it is free from debt and may 
be ranked among the most progressive in- 
land villages of the state. It enjoys the 
advantage of a good graded school, an 



M. E. Church, a Christian Church and a 
Friends meeting house. Many of the 
business houses and private residences 
would do credit to metropolitan cities, 
while the enterprise and business ability 
of its merchants and manufacturers (most 
of whom are noticed editorially in this 
work) are entitled to rank among the 
most enterprising and progressive citizens 
of the state, both in intelligence and busi- 
ness sagacity. The statistics of 1870 give 
to this place a population of 532; in 1880, 
634, while at the present time it contains 
fully 800 inhabitants. 



GEORGE B. WATSON. 

Groceries, Hats, Caps, Jewelry, No- 
tions, Glass and Qleensware and 
Bakery, etc. 
Mr. Watson began business in 1871 in a 
•small way but has so augmented his trade that 
it now amounts to fully $15,000 annually. He 
utilizes a salesroom 23XS0 feet in area, and the 
baking department, in the rear of the sales- 
room, is 23x22 feet in size. The building is 
owned by Mr. Watson, and imrmdiately over 
the salesroom and of the same dimensions is a 
conveniently arranged room known as "Wat- 
son's Hall,""used for entertainments and public 
gatherings. His stock is valued at from $4,000 
to $5,000 and includes a lull line of groceries 
and provisions for home and table supplies, 
hats, caps, notions, jewelry, glass and queens 
ware, etc. The advantages he enjoys in 
securing his supplies from importers, jobbers 
and producers enables him to compete suc- 
cessfully with any similar establishment in 
Eastern Indiana. The baking department 
receives special attention and his products in 
this line never fail to give satisfaction. Three 
thousand pounds of flour are consumed 
monthly in the production of choice family 
bread, cake*, pies, etc. Mr. Watson was born 
in Miami County, O., but has been a resident 
of Indiana for 44 years. He has served in the 
capacity of Postmaster of Farmland since 1S71. 
In 1S76 he lost all his property and means by 
tire, but went to work with little delay and 
erected the building he at present occupies, 
which is one of the finest structures in Farm- 
land. He is a selfmade man in every respect 
and occupies the front rank among the repre- 
sentative business men of Eastern Indiana. 



The Watson Hotel, at this place, is the only 
hotel in the town and affords ample and satis- 
factory accommodations to the traveling public. 



JOHN L. REEVES, 

Drlgs, Medicines, Groceries, etc.; 
(T. W. Keasby, Agent.) 
This house had its inception in 1S79 Dut b- as 
been in the hands of its present proprietor 
since October, 1SS1, who has by energv atid 
business application built up a large "trade. 
The salesroom occupied is 20x63 feet in size, 
while a large wareroom in the rear is also 
used. A fine assortment of pure and fresh 
drugs', medicines, druggists' sundries, grocer- 
ies, both staple and fancy, paints, oils, cigars 
and tobaccos of the best brands, etc., will 
always be found on hand, and Mr. T. W. 
Keasby, under whose able management the 
I house is meeting with such flattering success, 
I will always be found ready to give prompt 
i attention 'to the wants of parties visiting the 
i establishment. He is a native of Muncie, 
j Delaware County, Ind , but was lately a resi- 
| dent of Xenia, Miami County, Ind. 

j W. W. WILSON, 

Carriage Mancfactcrer. 
Among the carnage manufacturers of Indi- 
j ana we rind W. W. Wilson, of Farmland, 

prominently engaged in manufacturing goods 
i in this line. He pursued custom blacksmith- 
j ing for a period of 15 years and began the 
I manufacture of carriages in 1SS3. His shop 1s 

1SX36 feet in size and two stories in height and 

the blacksmith department is 30x40 feet in area. 

Four skilled assistants are regularly employed 



194 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



and every article leaving the establishment is 
guaranteed to give entire satisfaction. About 
15 new rigs are turned out annually and the 
Iron work on about 25 new farm wagons is 
done at the same time. Mr. Wilson is a native 
of Wayne County, Ind., but has resided here 
since 1S66. During the war he enlisted in the 
69th O. V. I. for three years and afterwards 
re-enlisted for the same length of time. An 
honorable discharge was given him in July, 
1S65, after having participated in 23 heated 
engagements. He was at Stone River and 
with Sherman at Atlanta and through the 
entire Georgia campaign, marching all the 
way around to Washington at its close. Al- 
though twice wounded, he was never in a 
hospital and never rode a mile in an ambu- 
lance. He is one of Farmland's most respected 
citizens and an enterprising and practical busi- 
ness man. 



BLY & THORN BURG, 

Drugs, Books, Staionery, Paints, 

Oils, etc. 
This house was founded about 20 years ago 
by Dr. Hennings. In 1SS1,' after having been 
connected with the house for some time as 
clerk, Mr. Bly purchased an interest therein 
and. the firm name became Gahle & Bly. In 
1SS2 Mr. Thornburg became Mr. Gable's suc- 
cessor and the firm assumed its present name 
and style. These gentlemen occupy a taste- 
fully arranged salesroom 24x65 feet in size and 
carry a full lme of pure and fresh drugs, stand- 
ard proprietary and patent medicines, school, 
blank and miscellaneous books, stationery, 
druggists' sundries, paints, oils, window glass, 
etc. Keeping only No. 1 goods, selling at 
uniformly low and satisfactory prices and 
treating patrons with fairness and courtesy, 
have combined to increase their trade to such 
an extent that it now amounts to over $12,000 
annually and is still growing. P. M. Bly and 
J. H. Thornburg are both natives of this state 
and both were born in 1S57. They are young 
men of rare attainments and extended experi- 
ence in their business. 



BRANSON & CARTER, 

Dealers in Hardware, Blacksmiths' 
and Bcilders' Supplies and All 
Kinds of Seeds. 
This house has steadily grown in public 
favor since its inception, two years ago, and is 
now the leading establishment in its line in 
Farndand. The business was originally lim- 
ited to hardware, but in the spring of 1SS3 
lumber, doors, sash, frames, b'inds and build- 
ers' material generally were added. A full 
line of mechanics' tools and seeds of all kinds 
are kept in stock. Two floors, each 18x55 
feet in size, are occupied and both filled to re- 
pletion, with warehouse in addition 20x45 f ee *- 
Their trade, extending throughout Farmland 
and the adjoining country' districts, already 
amounts to fully $25,000 annually and is stiil 
growing rapidly. Fully comprehending the 



wants of the public in their line, Messrs. 
Branson & Carter make it a point to keep their 
stuck constantly replenished by invoices of 
new and desirable goods, and the rapid growth 
of Farmland, together with the general indus- 
trial thrift of the agricultural districts that 
surround it, make their business one that con- 
duces largely to the public good Mr. J. B. 
Branson was born in North Carolina in 1S30 
but has been a resident of this state fo- 40 
yer.rs. Mr. W. B. Carter is a native of Ohio 
and was born in 1S35. He came here in 1S59. 
Both ^re highly e-teemed Citizens and enter- 
prising business men, who are contributing by 
their business and industry to the general 
development and prosperity "of Farmland. 



S. S. CLARK, 

Dealer in Agricultural Implements. 
This house had its inception about 12 years 
ago under the firm name of Robbins & Carter, 
and in February, 1S82, Mr. S. S. Clark pur- 
chased the stock. He occupies a salesroom 
30x56 feet in size and among the agricultural 
implements and machines in which he makes 
a specialty we may mention the following: 
"Dayton," "Weir," '"Furst & Bradley," "Mis- 
haw aka," "Buckey," "Moline" and "Oliver 
Chilled" plows; "Empire" harvesters; "Cham,- 
pion," "Buckeye" and "Hoosier" drills; "Win- 
chester," "Peru" and "Jackson" wagons; 
"Troy Champion," "Barlow" and "Peoria" 
corn planters, harrows, cultivators, etc. It 
will be noticed that Mr. Clark handles none 
but implements of the most popular standard 
makes and every implement or machine that 
leaves the house is guaranteed to give entire 
satisfaction, and Mr. Claik will always be 
found liberal with regard to prices and terms. 
His annual sales amount to about $S,ooo. 
Mr. Clark is a native of Allen County, Ind., 
but has been a resident of Randolph County 
for 50 years and is widely and favorably 
known throughout the entire county. Dur- 
ing the war of the rebellion he served as a 
member of the 9th Indiana Infantry and par- 
ticipated in the engagements of Pulaski, Lynn, 
Franklin and Nashville. His straightforward 
career entitles him to public confidence. 



NATHAN E. GRAY, 

Furniture and Undertakers' Goods. 
This house, the only one of the kind here, 
was opened to the public about nine years ago 
by J. S. Davis, and in 1878 it fell into the 
hands of the present proprietor, Mr. N. E. 
Gray. A salesroom 20x50 feet in size is used, 
together with an additional room on second 
floor for storage purposes. Some furniture is 
manufactured and a well selected stock of 
goods always kept on hand. Mr. Gray has a 
tine hearse and a full line of undertakers' sup- 
plies and interments receive prompt and satis- 
factory attention. He also handle-, the "New 
Home," "Domestic" and "Hartford" tewing 
machines, all of which are well known and 
are deservedly popular. The trade of the 



FARMLAND. 



195 



house is steadily increasing and now amounts 
to about $5,000 annually. Mr. Gray is a 
practical workman and attends promptly to all 
orders lett in his hands, whether for new goods 
or repairing in any of its departments. He is 
a native and lifelong resident of this county 
and is deservedly popular in business circles. 



L. B. MARK, 

Hardware, Blacksmiths' and Build- 
ers' Supplies. 
This house is long established and well 
known, having had its inception 12 years ago, 
when Mr. David Macy began the business in 
a small way. Mr. Macy was succeeded by 
Shaw Sc Johnson, hut upon the retirement of 
Mr. Johnson, W. C. Shaw became the exclu- 
sive proprietor. The next firm name was 
Shaw & Wood, but this finally gave wav to 
that of Wood & Mark, and in "1SS2 Mr. Wood 
withdrew, leaving the present proprietor in 
control of the business. Mr. Mark occupies a 
salesroom i6xSo feet in dimensions, in addi- 
tion to which he utilizes a room on the second 
floor of the same size and a wareroom in the 
rear for storage purposes. The stock carried 
will amount to fully $6,000 and comprises a 
completeness and variety in his line that is not 
easily excelled. Parties desiring hardware 
supplies, tools and implements of the best 
standard makes, building materials, iron, etc., 
will find in Mr. Mark's stock the articles re- 
quired, while his prices are invariably uniform 
and satisfactory. He also keeps in stock a fine 
line of all kinds of seeds, in which he is pre- 
pared to offer valuable inducements to the 
trade. He employs two competent assistants 
and transacts an annual business amounting 
to about $15,000. Mr. L. B. Mark is a native 
of Grant County, Ind., but has been a resident 
of this county since 1859. He was identified 
with the tile manufacturing industry for four 
years and was also engaged in teaching for a 
number of years. 



DR. E. A. BURNS, 

Drugs, Books, Paints, Stationery, 

Wall Paper, etc. 
This house was founded in 1S69 by Aaron 
Shaw, who was succeeded by Robbins & Co., 
then E. R. Robbins, afterwards Robbins & 
Meredith, and in August, 1SS3, the present 
proprietor took possession. This is at present 
one of the leading houses in this line in this 
section of Randolph Countv. The room occu- 
pied is neatly furnished and is 20x60 feet in 
size. An additional wareroom 15x15 feet in 
area is also used. A stock valued at $4,000 is 
.kept constantly on hand and a finer line of 
pure drugs, standard proprietary medicines, 
paints, oils, school, blank and miscellaneous 
books, stationery, wall paper, notions, etc., is 
not easily obtained. Three competent clerks 
attend to the wants of patrons, and the annual 
business transactions will aggregate fully 
$15,000. Care and skill are exercised in the 
filling and compounding of physicians' pre- 



scriptions and family recipes, the confidence 
and esteem of the entire community having 
been gained in this line. Dr. Burns is a 
native of Middlesex County, Mass. He came 
to Indiana in 1S50, practiced medicine for 25 
years in Elkhart County and resided for nine 
years in Southwestern Missouri. He has- 
fiJled a number of important public positions, 
to the entire satisfaction of all concerned. 



JOHN H. GROOMS, 
Meat Market. 



No town is complete in itsbusine-s facilities 
without a well conducted and reliable meat 
market. In this respect the city of Farmland 
is well supplied in this particular bv the estab- 
lishment managed by Mr. John H. Grooms. 
This gentleman has been identified with the 
butchering business for a period of 13 \ ear-, 
having been in the business for himself for 
the past 10 years. His market is 15x20 feet in 
size, neatly fitted up and is a modei of cleanli- 
ness. He disposes of about 90 head of fat 
cattle annually and of small stock in propor- 
tion. His meats will always be found pure. 
fresh and the best the market affords at all 
times, giving his house a leading position in 
this department of trade in this city and sur- 
rounding country. Mr. Grooms w'as born in 
Covington, Ky., in 1S53, Dut has spent the 
greater part of his life in this state. 



BARKER & MILLS, 

Manufacturers of Harness. 
This establishment has been in existence 
about 10 years. The premises occupied are 
18x50 feet in size, with workroom in the rear, 
and a force of four skilled workmen are con- 
stantly employed. About 100 sets of single 
and double harness are turned out annually 
and repairing in all its departments receives 
prompt and satisfactory attention. The pro- 
prieters are careful and judicious in the selec- 
tion of their material and guarantee superior 
workmanship in every particular. Their 
prices and terms are reasonable and the satis- 
faction with which their work has always 
been received has so augmented their trade 
that it is now lucrative and satisfactory and is 
still perceptibly increasing. Mr. M.'B. Bar- 
ker, the senior member of the firm, is a native 
of Randolph County, where he was born in 
1S46. He is a practical harness maker. Mr. 
Joseph W. Mills is also a native of Randolph 
County, where he was born in 1S55. 

JAMES H. STINSON, 

Boots and Shoes, Hand Made Work 

a Specialty. 
Mr. Stinson began business about eight 
years ago and has succeeded in building up a 
permanent and lucrative trade. The premises 
occupied for business purposes are 16x40 feet 
In dimensions, and in addition to his personal 
attention he employs one skilled assistant. 
He keeps in stock a fine assortment of ready 
made boots and shoes, for men, women, boys, 



19(> 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



and children, but his leading specialty 
is the making of fine boots and shoes to order, 
lie turns out men's boots at prices ranging 
from $.j to $9 and ladies' shoes at from $2.50 
to $3 per pair. He uses the very best of 
material and is a neat and practical workman. 
Good fits are guaranteed in every particular. 
The long practical experience be "has enjoyed 
in this department of trade eminently qualities 
him for the execution of the most finished and 
substantial work. Mr. Stinson is a native of 
Maryland, where he was born in 1840. He 
has been a resident of this state for 20 years 
and has gained the highest esteem and confi- 
dence of the community in which he lives, 
lie was elected to the office of Justice of the 
Peace at the general election in 18S2, a posi- 
tion which he still holds, executing his trust 
with impartiality and ability. 



J. W. GRIMES, 

Stoves, Tinware and House Fur- 
nishing Goods. 
("This establishment was started about four 
years ago. The varied and well selected 



assortment of cooking and heating stoves, tin- 
ware, house furnishing goods, etc., is displayed 
in a salesroom 1SX40 feet in size, and an addi- 
tional side room and rear room are used for 
storage and manufacturing purposes. Three 
assistants are regularly employed and all 
orders for roofing, spouting or general job 
work receive prompt attention. The trade of 
the house is principally local and amounts to 
about $5,000 annually. A gradual increase, 
however, is perceptible, and Mr. Grimes' satis- 
factory work and reasonable prices make his 
house one of our permanent business con- 
cerns. Mr. Grimes was born in Clermont 
County, O., and located in Farmland in 1877. 
Two years later he began this business. 



Other business firms here are: II. Studc- 
baker, grain; S. P. Brundage, general mdse; 
J. C. Pates, grocer; J. S. Davis, dry goods; 
J. H. Reitenour, livery. 




134